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Prostate Cancer

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NEWS
April 14, 1999 | By Huntly Collins, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Scientists have taken a major step toward identifying another gene associated with prostate cancer that runs in families. The finding, which represents a fourth site on human chromosomes that may trigger the hereditary form of the disease, could eventually lead to a screening test and early diagnosis, researchers said. "If a family knows they have a lot of prostate cancer, this is very exciting," said Elaine Ostrander, a geneticist at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center in Seattle, who oversaw the study.
NEWS
February 29, 2008
MY HUSBAND recently passed away from advanced metastatic prostate cancer. He NEVER got his PSA test done at a time when this would have been caught - until, at age 59, certain complaints (and my nagging) forced him to his doctor. The test came back way over the acceptable range. After seeing his urologist, MRI and CTs were done, but only hormone shots to lower his testoserone would help. It was already past the point of anything other than that and possibly chemo to destroy some of the tumors.
NEWS
February 26, 2007 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Compared with white men, African American men are 50 percent more likely to develop prostate cancer, and twice as likely to die from it. They also tend to develop it at younger ages. Like other cancer genetics researchers, Matthew Freedman figured at least part of the explanation for this disparity must lie in the DNA. After all, defective genes that increased breast-cancer risk had been isolated in women, so it was reasonable to assume the equivalent was at work in prostate cancer.
NEWS
April 18, 2012 | Associated Press
OMAHA, Neb. - Warren Buffett has been diagnosed with early-stage prostate cancer, he told his company's shareholders in an open letter Tuesday. The 81-year-old billionaire investor and chief executive of Berkshire Hathaway Inc. said his condition is "not remotely life-threatening" or debilitating. He said he and his doctors have decided on a two-month treatment plan that is to begin in mid-July. "I feel great - as if I were in my normal excellent health," Buffett said in the letter.
NEWS
February 26, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis and Laura McCrystal, STAFF WRITERS
HARRISBURG - Gov. Wolf will undergo treatment for what he called a "mild" and treatable form of prostate cancer, but said it would not interfere with his job. In disclosing the illness Wednesday, Wolf, 67, did not offer details about his diagnosis or the treatment he expects in coming months. He said only that it would not require him to step aside, even temporarily. "It really was detected very early. So the procedure is going to be a truly minor one," the governor said at a Capitol news briefing, accompanied only by his wife, Frances.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2004 | Daily News wire services
James Brown, the "Godfather of Soul" and a legend in rap, rock and funk, has announced that he has prostate cancer. In a statement released yesterday, Brown, 71, said that he will undergo surgery for the ailment on Dec. 15. "I have overcome a lot of things in my life. I will overcome this as well," Brown said. Brown, best known for seminal hits like "I Feel Good," "Please, Please, Please," and "Cold Sweat," is also a diabetic. Dubbed the hardest-working man in show business, he finished a two-week Canadian tour on Thursday night.
SPORTS
February 4, 2009 | Daily News Wire Services
Former Kentucky and New Mexico State football coach Hal Mumme has been diagnosed with prostate cancer. Mumme's agent, Russ Campbell, confirmed the diagnosis yesterday to the Associated Press. He said the prognosis is good because the illness was detected early. Mumme, 56, was head coach at Kentucky from 1997 to 2000 and his teams were 20-26. He left amid a recruiting scandal that led to the football program being sanctioned by the NCAA. He was fired by New Mexico State in December after a 4-year stint.
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two new prostate cancer studies have found that many low-risk patients have been receiving more treatment than is needed or helpful - racking up millions of dollars in excess health-care costs and, potentially, causing more physical harm than good. One of the studies, both of which were published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine, showed that among patients whose cancer was not aggressive, those who received hormone therapy as their primary treatment did not live any longer than those who were merely carefully monitored.
NEWS
May 9, 2013 | By Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press
A new genetic test to gauge the aggressiveness of prostate cancer may help tens of thousands of men each year decide whether they need to treat their cancer right away or can safely monitor it. The new test, which goes on sale Wednesday, joins another one that recently came on the market. Both analyze multiple genes in a biopsy sample and give a score for aggressiveness, similar to tests used now for certain breast and colon cancers. Doctors say tests like these have the potential to curb a major problem in cancer care - overtreatment.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 5, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Is removing the prostate through tiny incisions, using a robotic system, better than traditional open-the-abdomen surgery? Prostate cancer specialists have argued about that question for 16 years, ever since U.S. approval of the high-tech, high-cost system made it a coveted commodity for hospitals trying to stay competitive. In July, the Lancet medical journal published an eagerly anticipated Australian clinical trial, the first to randomly assign men to the different methods and compare their outcomes.
BUSINESS
August 24, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
Pharmaceutical giant Pfizer announced Monday that it will buy cancer biotech company Medivation for about $14 billion, adding a leading prostate-cancer drug to its oncology offerings. San Francisco-based Medivation shares were up nearly 20 percent on the news, closing Monday at $80.42 per share. Pfizer will pay $81.50 a share in cash for Medivation, compared with Sanofi S.A.'s offer in April of $52.50 a share. Since then, Merck, AstraZeneca, Celgene, and Gilead Sciences all reportedly had expressed interest in buying the cancer biotech.
NEWS
August 20, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
When an influential federal panel recommended in 2012 that doctors omit prostate cancer screening from routine health care, it set off a firestorm. Many men and their doctors seem to have heeded the advice, though the long-term implications won't be clear for a while, a new analysis suggests. The advice of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force appears to have led to a sizable drop in screening with the PSA blood test, and in diagnosis of early-stage prostate cancer, according to American Cancer Society researchers who have been monitoring the trends.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
Replacing Andre Watts in a high-profile engagement has long given young pianists a career boost. Watts' Aug. 17 cancellation with the Philadelphia Orchestra at the Saratoga (N.Y.) Performing Arts Center, however, comes with extra gravity: The long-admired 70-year-old pianist has prostate cancer. "It's Andre's wish that we be straight about that," said his manager Linda Marder, whose talent roster at CM Artists includes numerous pianists who are guests of the Philadelphia Orchestra. "Men of a certain age have this problem.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, STAFF WRITER
A new study documents a decade-long increase in the number of men who have incurable prostate cancer at their initial diagnosis, an ominous finding that prostate cancer-screening proponents have been predicting. Both screening and diagnosis of early-stage prostate cancer have declined, coinciding with recommendations from an influential government advisory panel. In 2008, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force said not to do routine PSA blood testing of men over age 74. And in 2012, it said to not screen any men - not even those at high risk - because the harms of unnecessary treatment outweigh the benefits of catching cancer early.
NEWS
July 9, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Men with metastatic prostate cancer have a surprisingly high rate of inherited mutations in DNA-repair genes, suggesting that all men with such advanced prostate cancer should be considered for genetic testing, a new study concludes. Genetic testing is not recommended for men with cancer confined to the prostate - or men whose cancer later spreads - because studies have found less than 5 percent have defective DNA-repair genes. But the prevalence of such defects among men who are initially diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer has been unclear, according to the new study, published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine by researchers from six leading cancer centers in the United States and Britain.
NEWS
July 2, 2016 | By Justine McDaniel, Staff Writer
Peter A. Brigham, 76, of Wynnewood, a national leader in the field of burn injury care and prevention, died of prostate cancer Wednesday, June 22, at Wesley Enhanced Living Main Line in Media. Mr. Brigham was the founding director of the Philadelphia-based Burn Foundation, which supports burn care centers at area hospitals. He was president of the organization for a quarter-century, from 1979 to 2004, while simultaneously making strides in national burn data collection. He was considered a groundbreaker for his work with the American Burn Association (ABA)
SPORTS
June 27, 2016 | By Sam Carchidi, STAFF WRITER
BUFFALO - Pascal Laberge and his family have been through a tragic year, but the talented right winger had a moment to savor Saturday morning as he hugged his father after learning the Flyers had selected him in the second round of the NHL draft. "My family and I have been through a lot," Laberge said. Last September, his stepmother - a woman Laberge said he "loved dearly" - died of cancer. It wasn't many days later that his father called Laberge and his brothers into their living room and broke down in tears, telling them he had prostate cancer.
NEWS
June 12, 2016
Q. Should I get screened for prostate cancer? A. Prostate specific antigen, or PSA, testing remains the main screening test for prostate cancer, along with clinical prostate gland examination. PSA is produced by the prostate gland in men; higher levels of PSA may indicate the presence of prostate cancer. But studies also indicate that overdiagnosis and overtreatment of prostate cancer could be a concern, because men often die with and not of prostate cancer. Because we can't yet determine which early-stage prostate cancers can progress to advanced disease and which are slow-growing and can be left untreated, a number of professional organizations recommend "shared decision-making.
NEWS
May 25, 2016 | By Stephanie Farr, Staff Writer
When he was diagnosed with stage-4 prostate cancer in December 2010, Philadelphia Police Officer James Henninger was told he had between six months and two years to live. But that didn't stop the veteran officer from reporting to work every day in Center City's Ninth District, while he received radiation treatment on his lunch break. On Saturday, May 21 - more than five years after his diagnosis - Mr. Henninger, 71, lost his battle with cancer at Crossroads Hospice in Plymouth Meeting, one week before his 50th wedding anniversary.
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