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Prostate Cancer

ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2004 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
James Brown, the Godfather of Soul, has prostate cancer, the New York Post reports. Brown, 71, who also suffers from diabetes, will undergo surgery Wednesday. "I have overcome a lot of things in my life. I will overcome this as well," he told his manager, SuperFrank. Brown just completed a two-week tour of Canada. His new autobiography, I Feel Good: A Memoir of a Life of Soul, is due out next month. Brown joins a too-long list of well-known prostate-cancer victims, including Colin Powell, John Kerry, Rudy Giuliani, Nelson Mandela and Joe Torre.
NEWS
February 1, 2012 | By Marilynn Marchione
ASSOCIATED PRESS A warning to men considering a pricey new treatment for prostate cancer called proton therapy: Research suggests it might have more side effects than traditional radiation does. A study of Medicare records found that men treated with proton beams later had one-third more bowel problems, such as bleeding and blockages, than men given conventional radiation. This is an observational study, so it is not definitive, but it is one of the largest to compare those treatments.
NEWS
November 26, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: I recently had a prostate biopsy, which showed a small area of cancer. My urologist discussed the option of close surveillance, with periodic biopsies and regular PSA blood testing. I'm 65 years old and otherwise in great health. Do you think it's better to treat the cancer or just watch it? Answer: In the case of early prostate cancer like you have, "active surveillance" is a reasonable approach. The downsides are the uncertainty of the disease course and the anxiety of living with prostate cancer.
NEWS
September 14, 2015 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
For researchers, physicians - and patients - prostate cancer has always been among the most maddening and elusive of foes. The third-most common cancer in the United States, behind breast and lung cancers, its course is less predictable than either. It can remain dormant in a man's body until he dies decades later from something else. Or it can spread aggressively and kill. The riddle has been how to tell one cancer from another. Now researchers at Thomas Jefferson University and elsewhere think they are coming closer to solving it through increasingly sophisticated genetic studies.
NEWS
October 2, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Decades after lumpectomy became a standard option for women with breast cancer, men are seeking a similarly targeted approach to prostate cancer, one that gets rid of the tumor while preserving the organ. This sensible tack has lagged in prostate cancer for many reasons, starting with the fact that the golf-ball-size gland is inaccessible. It lies deep within the pelvic cavity, surrounded by sensitive structures that are vital to sexual and urinary health. Now, however, an array of technologies is enabling doctors to visualize and zap away prostate malignancies.
SPORTS
April 9, 2011 | Daily News Wire Services
Steve Lavin , who revived St. John's basketball in his first season with the Red Storm, has prostate cancer, but his doctor expects him to keep coaching and make a complete recovery. Lavin, 46, said in a statement yesterday he was diagnosed in September and was told he could delay treatment until after the season. He will begin treatment in the coming weeks. The statement did not say how he will treated. "My family feels fortunate that through annual health exams, we detected my condition at an early stage," Lavin said.
SPORTS
April 21, 1992 | by Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Writer
When Jim Ferree won the PGA Seniors Bell Atlantic Classic last May, just one month shy of his 60th birthday, he used words like "cherish" and "savor" to describe the victory, only the third of a professional career that has spanned five decades. "You never know if it'll be your last," Ferree said that day. "A lot of guys my age are dead. " George Lanning, a 58-year-old fellow Senior, had just died while convalescing from open-heart bypass surgery, and that clearly had an effect on Ferree.
NEWS
September 5, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Is removing the prostate through tiny incisions, using a robotic system, better than traditional open-the-abdomen surgery? Prostate cancer specialists have argued about that question for 16 years, ever since U.S. approval of the high-tech, high-cost system made it a coveted commodity for hospitals trying to stay competitive. In July, the Lancet medical journal published an eagerly anticipated Australian clinical trial, the first to randomly assign men to the different methods and compare their outcomes.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, STAFF WRITER
A new study documents a decade-long increase in the number of men who have incurable prostate cancer at their initial diagnosis, an ominous finding that prostate cancer-screening proponents have been predicting. Both screening and diagnosis of early-stage prostate cancer have declined, coinciding with recommendations from an influential government advisory panel. In 2008, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force said not to do routine PSA blood testing of men over age 74. And in 2012, it said to not screen any men - not even those at high risk - because the harms of unnecessary treatment outweigh the benefits of catching cancer early.
NEWS
July 9, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Men with metastatic prostate cancer have a surprisingly high rate of inherited mutations in DNA-repair genes, suggesting that all men with such advanced prostate cancer should be considered for genetic testing, a new study concludes. Genetic testing is not recommended for men with cancer confined to the prostate - or men whose cancer later spreads - because studies have found less than 5 percent have defective DNA-repair genes. But the prevalence of such defects among men who are initially diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer has been unclear, according to the new study, published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine by researchers from six leading cancer centers in the United States and Britain.
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