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Prostate Cancer

NEWS
February 1, 2012 | By Marilynn Marchione
ASSOCIATED PRESS A warning to men considering a pricey new treatment for prostate cancer called proton therapy: Research suggests it might have more side effects than traditional radiation does. A study of Medicare records found that men treated with proton beams later had one-third more bowel problems, such as bleeding and blockages, than men given conventional radiation. This is an observational study, so it is not definitive, but it is one of the largest to compare those treatments.
NEWS
October 2, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Decades after lumpectomy became a standard option for women with breast cancer, men are seeking a similarly targeted approach to prostate cancer, one that gets rid of the tumor while preserving the organ. This sensible tack has lagged in prostate cancer for many reasons, starting with the fact that the golf-ball-size gland is inaccessible. It lies deep within the pelvic cavity, surrounded by sensitive structures that are vital to sexual and urinary health. Now, however, an array of technologies is enabling doctors to visualize and zap away prostate malignancies.
SPORTS
April 9, 2011 | Daily News Wire Services
Steve Lavin , who revived St. John's basketball in his first season with the Red Storm, has prostate cancer, but his doctor expects him to keep coaching and make a complete recovery. Lavin, 46, said in a statement yesterday he was diagnosed in September and was told he could delay treatment until after the season. He will begin treatment in the coming weeks. The statement did not say how he will treated. "My family feels fortunate that through annual health exams, we detected my condition at an early stage," Lavin said.
SPORTS
April 21, 1992 | by Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Writer
When Jim Ferree won the PGA Seniors Bell Atlantic Classic last May, just one month shy of his 60th birthday, he used words like "cherish" and "savor" to describe the victory, only the third of a professional career that has spanned five decades. "You never know if it'll be your last," Ferree said that day. "A lot of guys my age are dead. " George Lanning, a 58-year-old fellow Senior, had just died while convalescing from open-heart bypass surgery, and that clearly had an effect on Ferree.
NEWS
May 23, 2012 | By Virginia A. Moyer
Amid the many messages you will hear about screening for prostate cancer in the coming days, I hope these stand out: There is at best a small potential benefit from prostate cancer screening, and there are substantial known harms. We need a better test, and we need better treatment options. The panel I chair, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, has just issued a recommendation against screening men of any age for prostate cancer using the prostate-specific antigen, or PSA, blood test.
NEWS
October 4, 2012 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Prostate cancer is especially tough on African Americans. They are about 50 percent more likely than white men to get the disease and twice as likely to die of it. The Prostate Cancer Foundation wants to help research institutions in Philadelphia take the lead in figuring out why, the foundation's founder and co-chair, Michael Milken, said Tuesday evening during the group's 10th annual fund-raiser in Philadelphia. Milken said he wonders, "What can we learn from this that would not only help them but will help all men on the planet?"
NEWS
December 16, 2003 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The disease that Secretary of State Colin L. Powell is now fighting is as complex and confounding as it is common. Prostate cancer strikes one in six men, and is second only to lung cancer as a cause of cancer death among U.S. men. Last year, it was diagnosed in 190,000, and killed more than 30,000, the majority of them over age 65. The causes of prostate cancer remain unclear, although certain risk factors are known, including age, family...
NEWS
August 11, 2013 | By Leila Haghighat, Inquirer Staff Writer
Holy mackerel! Or, in light of a new study, "unholy" might be more appropriate. Omega-3 fatty acids derived from oil in fatty fish like mackerel, tuna, and salmon are still endorsed by doctors for controlling blood fats in heart disease. But when it comes to preventing cancer, the verdict has gotten murky. A study published in July found omega-3 may raise the risk of prostate cancer. "This is not a happy finding," said Theodore Brasky, who led the study at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center.
SPORTS
October 17, 1995 | by Mark Kram, Daily News Sports Writer
Still tinglng with euphoria over the Bills' victory over Seattle on Sunday and their surprising 5-1 start this season, this city awoke to some shocking and sobering news: Head coach Marv Levy has prostate cancer and will undergo surgery today at the Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Breaking the news to his stunned team and then the media yesterday, Levy, 67, said that doctors have told him that the disease appears to be in the early stages, and that the prognosis for a complete recovery appears good.
NEWS
November 1, 1989 | By Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
American men are dying of prostate cancer, a disease that's curable in its early stages, simply because they are too embarrassed to talk about it or be examined for it. And all too often, physicians admit, doctors are part of the problem. One in 11 men will develop prostate cancer at some point during his lifetime. It is the third leading cause of cancer deaths in men. Black American men, for unknown reasons, experience the highest rate of prostate cancer in the world. And as the population ages, the incidence of prostate cancer will increase because it is a disease primarily of older men. Eighty percent of its victims are 65 or older.
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