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Prostate Cancer

NEWS
February 26, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Gov. Wolf said his prostate cancer was detected after a "regular checkup revealed abnormalities. " He declined to clarify whether that means he has been having routine PSA blood tests to check for prostate cancer. In recent years, PSA screening rates have been falling as expert groups have stressed the limits and risks of the practice. The prostate-specific antigen test checks for a blood protein that can surge with benign as well as malignant prostate gland changes. Initially approved only to monitor cancer patients for recurrence, the PSA test cannot distinguish aggressive malignancies from those that would never be life-threatening if left untreated.
NEWS
February 26, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis and Laura McCrystal, STAFF WRITERS
HARRISBURG - Gov. Wolf will undergo treatment for what he called a "mild" and treatable form of prostate cancer, but said it would not interfere with his job. In disclosing the illness Wednesday, Wolf, 67, did not offer details about his diagnosis or the treatment he expects in coming months. He said only that it would not require him to step aside, even temporarily. "It really was detected very early. So the procedure is going to be a truly minor one," the governor said at a Capitol news briefing, accompanied only by his wife, Frances.
NEWS
January 31, 2016
Three experts from Fox Chase Cancer Center's Department of Radiation Oncology answer frequently asked questions about radiation therapy. Q: What is the goal of radiation therapy with respect to treating cancer? A: For most patients, the goal is to get rid of the cancer completely and, hopefully, prevent it from returning. But for those whose cancer has spread, radiation may be used palliatively, to make symptoms better and improve quality of life, knowing that we likely will not cure the cancer.
NEWS
December 14, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
After Bob Garraty's annual PSA blood test led to the diagnosis of a tiny, slow-growing prostate tumor, he opted to do something almost as stressful as getting treatment. He postponed it. Like a growing number of men, he chose "active surveillance" of his cancer. He had PSA blood tests plus physical exams every three months, and biopsies every year, in hopes that he would never need surgery or radiation - and never risk treatment-related urinary and sexual problems. It didn't turn out quite that way. In October, after four years of surveillance, his biopsy revealed the cancer was turning more aggressive.
NEWS
September 14, 2015 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
For researchers, physicians - and patients - prostate cancer has always been among the most maddening and elusive of foes. The third-most common cancer in the United States, behind breast and lung cancers, its course is less predictable than either. It can remain dormant in a man's body until he dies decades later from something else. Or it can spread aggressively and kill. The riddle has been how to tell one cancer from another. Now researchers at Thomas Jefferson University and elsewhere think they are coming closer to solving it through increasingly sophisticated genetic studies.
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
No future for SeanLize? Robin Wright 's ex-, Sean Penn , won't be the next Mr. Theron, after all. Us Weekly says the Crossing Guard director and his latest paramour, Charlize Theron , have parted ways. Penn, 54, and Theron, 39, who have been pals for years, became engaged in December after dating for about a year. In March, Penn told Esquire UK his past failures would not affect his chances with Theron. "You say I've been married twice before, but I've been married under circumstances where I was less informed than I am today," he said.
NEWS
April 19, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Researchers who study hereditary breast and ovarian cancer call it "the Angelina Jolie Effect. " They reported a sustained global surge in requests for BRCA genetic testing after the actress wrote about her preventive mastectomy two years ago. Last month, she gave another boost to awareness when she wrote about her recent surgery to remove her ovaries. But raising awareness hasn't necessarily lowered barriers, BRCA experts say. People seeking to identify and manage their inherited cancer risk often confront conflicting, confusing medical guidelines, test options, and insurance coverage.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2015 | By Molly Eichel
TELEVISION HOST, producer and part-time Philly resident Marc Summers revealed on WWMR's Preston and Steve Show yesterday morning that he is a cancer survivor. Summers, best known as the host of Nickelodeon's "Double Dare" and the Food Network's "Unwrapped" (which doesn't even touch on the numerous shows on which he's served as producer), told listeners that he was diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia five years ago. He was in chemo for two years, yet still went about his daily business, not revealing his diagnosis.
NEWS
February 4, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
John A. Zinn Jr., 98, of Glen Mills, formerly of Folsom, who installed turbines for Westinghouse Corp. across the globe, died Wednesday, Jan. 28, of prostate cancer at his daughter's home in Media. Called "Jack" by friends, Mr. Zinn was a 1935 graduate of Glen-Nor High School in Glenolden. He volunteered for military service early in 1941 and was accepted into the Army Air Corps during what became World War II later that year. His duties included teaching aerial photography at Lowry Field in Denver, Colo., and participating in a radar technology testing program.
NEWS
January 9, 2015 | By Steve and Mia
Q: I'm a 32-year-old woman. I met a guy who on our first date told me had prostate cancer, but that doctors had operated on him and he was now cancer free. We had an OK time and he asked me out again. My friend said I shouldn't go out with him because of his medical history. What do you think?   Mia: Sorry, girlfriend, but you're not giving us enough information. Are you saying you're squeamish just because he had cancer? Or are you concerned about his ability to father children, or even just get and maintain an erection?
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