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Prostate Cancer

NEWS
October 8, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than a decade after prostate cancer became the economic driver behind proton beam therapy in the U.S., it still isn't clear that men treated with the technology do better than those who get less costly radiation treatments. That's why expert groups have recently advised against insurance coverage of proton therapy for prostate cancer - and why some private plans are refusing to pay for it. The Catch-22 is that this pullback is hampering a clinical trial co-led by the University of Pennsylvania that would finally settle the question of superiority.
NEWS
September 23, 2014
ISSUE | ISIS CRISIS Can't hold back What Charles Krauthammer calls President Obama's ongoing "reluctance and ambivalence" to fully confront ISIS in Syria and Iraq (or what is now left of those countries) has the potential to create a scenario the left wantonly ignores - that our commander-in-chief may be forced to obliterate these virulent jihadists by finally putting many thousands of American boots on the ground ("All bile all the time," Sept. 18). But by then the ground could well be our own heartland.
NEWS
September 16, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kristine Warner wanted an eye-catching way to encourage men to talk to their doctors about the complicated, controversial subject of prostate cancer screening. Don't Fear The Finger campaign was born. Go ahead and snicker. It got your attention. The finger in question, of course, is the one a physician puts up a man's rectum to feel for cancer in his prostate gland. The rectal exam is usually paired with a PSA blood test. Warner, a graphic designer, former lobbyist, and urologist's daughter, is the volunteer director of the Pennsylvania Prostate Cancer Coalition.
NEWS
August 18, 2014 | By Rachel Zamzow, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like many new relationships, this one developed over a cup of coffee. Except this one might lead to a new drug to inhibit the spread of cancer cells. Joseph M. Salvino, a medicinal chemist, and Alessandro Fatatis, a cancer biologist, crossed paths in spring 2010 at a departmental meeting at the Drexel University College of Medicine. Fatatis presented his recent discovery that breast and prostate cancer cells possess a receptor that allows them to infiltrate the bone, often the first site of metastasis for these cancers.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vicki Wolf was only 36 when she was first diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer. After her third diagnosis 11 years later, the native Philadelphian had a genetic test that revealed what she dreaded and expected: She had inherited a mutation in a gene that made her susceptible to the disease. She urged her brother, Harvey I. Singer, to get genetic testing and counseling, but he shrugged off the idea. "I said, 'I'm a guy.' To me, breast cancer was just something women get," Singer recalled.
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dominic M. Roberti, 81, of Bryn Mawr, a chemistry professor and longtime cancer survivor who helped others face lives as cancer patients, died Tuesday, July 15, of a heart attack at his home. Dr. Roberti worked for nearly 30 years at St. Joseph's University before retiring in 1995. He taught and held a variety of administrative positions, including acting dean in 1968 and 1969. He helped author the report that led to the admission of the first women to St. Joseph's in 1970. Dr. Roberti returned to teaching in 1971, and developed environmental and food-chemistry classes designed for nonscience majors.
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two new prostate cancer studies have found that many low-risk patients have been receiving more treatment than is needed or helpful - racking up millions of dollars in excess health-care costs and, potentially, causing more physical harm than good. One of the studies, both of which were published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine, showed that among patients whose cancer was not aggressive, those who received hormone therapy as their primary treatment did not live any longer than those who were merely carefully monitored.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Lisa D'Amour's Cherokee is receiving its world premiere at the Wilma, and under Anne Kauffman's direction, it's an impressive production: a terrific cast and an eye-popping set (designed by Mimi Lien). But this new script, D'Amour's first play after her big hit Detroit , still needs work. It is crammed with awkward exposition about the five characters' backgrounds and seems to lose its sense of humor without warning. Like Detroit , this play involves two couples, one young, one middle-aged: John (David Ingram)
NEWS
December 15, 2013 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Columnist
Tom Feraco worked out with a purpose during the offseason because of the inexperience of his Middle Township boys' basketball team. "Some teams, they know exactly where to go," Feraco said. "This team, I knew I would have to be out there on the court with them. " The coach knew he would have to show as well as tell. Feraco has taken the same approach to the news that he has prostate cancer and will be forced to leave his team in early January to undergo surgery at Temple University Hospital.
SPORTS
December 7, 2013 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dennis Scuderi Sr.'s second stint as Camden Catholic's football coach lasted just one season. Scuderi resigned Thursday, citing "work commitments" as well as concerns about his health. "I'm thankful for the opportunity," he said. "I wish Camden Catholic nothing but the best. " Scuderi underwent surgery for prostate cancer in early February. Although he said his health is good, he thinks he "might have come back too soon. " Scuderi hopes to coach again. He believes his health will continue to improve.
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