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Protectionism

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NEWS
March 8, 1996
Sadly, we haven't seen the last of Pat Buchanan. But if this week's GOP primaries did nothing else - besides, obviously, repairing Bob Dole's front-runner status - they showed the limits of the political Frankenstein that was getting to be called Buchananism. It is part honest anger at fat cats who get put on the cover of Time for firing hard-working parents, part blame-Mexico-first-ism and part holier-than-thou mullahism. In other words, a dangerous, high-octane stew, the dumbest ingredient of which was Mr. Buchanan's proposed economic "solution" - a draw-up-the-bridges, Fortress America protectionism.
BUSINESS
March 19, 1989 | By Robert A. Rankin, Inquirer Washington Bureau
If you thought Japan steamrollered the world economy during the last 10 years, watch what Europe does in the next 10. The European Community plans to forge its 12 national economies into one of the world's biggest and wealthiest markets by the end of 1992. With 320 million people and a gross national product of $4.5 trillion, Europe '92 will have virtually as much money as the United States and almost as many consumers as America and Japan combined. The Europeans' goal is to build their union into a global economic superpower, not into a giant market for Japan to exploit.
NEWS
August 3, 1986
Protectionist fever is white hot on Capitol Hill. The House is set to vote Wednesday on overriding President Reagan's veto of a bill that would sharply reduce imports of textiles and shoes. Prospects of achieving the necessary two-thirds vote look increasingly likely. Meanwhile the Senate Finance Committee appears eager to follow the House in drafting sweeping anti-trade legislation, the central thrust of which would be to mandate protection against imports for domestic industries that suffer from foreign competition.
NEWS
August 30, 1986
Patriotism or protectionism? I respond to your Aug. 7 editorial on textile "protectionism. " The issue is not quite as simple as you portray it. The 55 percent penetration of imported apparel into the U. S. market has been responsible for the loss of hundreds of thousands of jobs in urban and rural America. When textile companies go out of business in small mill towns, the workers don't move to Silicon Valley to build semiconductors. They don't start their own new companies, and they can't all get a new job at the local fast-food restaurant.
NEWS
May 15, 2001
KATI SIPP (OpEd column, May 9) is misguided. Free trade improves the quality of life for people in the Third World and lowers the cost of consumer goods here. An individual in a South American slum will never enjoy the quality of life we enjoy here, but working in a factory for $3 a day is better than not working at all. Sipp decries "corporate- driven globalization," nothing but a shallow slogan intended to frighten and to rally support for the type of socialist protectionism she no doubt supports.
NEWS
March 4, 1987 | By Marvin Olasky
Election issues have a way of resurfacing. Although "protectionism" is sometimes spoken of as a new flash point in American politics, a look at newspapers of 1888 shows interesting parallels to the coming campaign, as well as a few odd twists. Protectionism was a key economic question then. The Chicago Tribune called free trade the great issue of the 1888 balloting. A popular President, Grover Cleveland, supported free trade; a Senate controlled by the opposition party favored protectionism.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1999 | By Al Haas, INQUIRER AUTOMOTIVE WRITER
The chairman of DaimlerChrysler told a Philadelphia audience yesterday that Europe and the United States ought to form a "Transatlantic Free Trade Area" to deal with the rising tide of protectionism on both sides of the Atlantic. "Isn't it ironic that at a moment when . . . German and American soldiers are fighting side by side in the NATO Alliance, Europe and the U.S. are at daggers drawn over trade issues?" Juergen E. Schrempp asked in a speech at the Union League marking the World Affairs Council's 50th anniversary.
NEWS
December 6, 1989 | By MICHAEL KINSLEY
Unlike James Fallows, I have never lived in Japan. So I cannot challenge his descriptions of Japanese economic life as fundamentally different from our own. Fallows has become America's leading proponent of the view that, because the Japanese are so completely different, normal economic thinking - in particular, the principles of free trade - cannot apply to our relationship with them. He promotes this argument in the December issue of Atlantic Monthly. Fallows knows Japan. But nothing about his explanation of Japanese society undermines the case for America to follow a policy of open trade.
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NEWS
June 10, 2013 | By George Will
The steamboat conveying Andrew Jackson up the Ohio River toward his tumultuous 1829 inauguration had brooms lashed to its bow, symbolizing Old Hickory's vow to clean up Washington. But sweeping out Washington's Augean stables, like painting the Golden Gate Bridge, is steady work, so steady it never ends. Neither do the policies that cosset sugar producers. These immortal measures just received the Senate's benediction because they illustrate the only law Washington can be counted on to respect.
NEWS
November 14, 2012
Protectionism, Philly-style In supporting measures by Mayor Nutter and Councilman Bill Green to give preference in hiring and purchasing to city residents and businesses, the editors confess that, "Yes, both initiatives sound like protectionism" ("Good to see city take steps to bring more jobs to town," Saturday). They sound like protectionism because they are protectionism. Imagine if the surrounding municipalities all adopted similar policies; each would lose the benefit of free trade with its neighbors to the detriment of all. Beggar-thy-neighbor policies like these hurt everyone.
NEWS
April 17, 2008 | By Pat Toomey
The NAFTA-bashing that defined Ohio's presidential primary has made its way to the Keystone State. With Pennsylvania's crucial primary next week, Hillary Rodham Clinton and Barack Obama are locked in a fierce competition to prove their anti-free-trade bona fides in the state's heavily unionized territories. In their speeches at the Pennsylvania AFL-CIO's annual convention earlier this month, both vowed to oppose the Colombia trade agreement President Bush is pushing. In the same speeches, both reiterated their opposition to NAFTA, with Clinton promising to "fix" it. In stark contrast, Bill Clinton spoke at the same annual convention in 1997, offering a sincere defense of free trade: "About one-third of the economic growth that's produced 13 million new jobs over the last 4 1/2 years," he said, "has come from selling more American products overseas.
BUSINESS
June 3, 2005 | By Tim Johnson INQUIRER FOREIGN SERVICE
U.S. Commerce Secretary Carlos Gutierrez warned China yesterday to crack down hard on piracy or risk "an outbreak of protectionism" in the United States. He lashed out at the wave of counterfeit products that Chinese companies produce, equating such piracy with criminal efforts to counterfeit cash. Unless China's leaders move from promises to strong action on issues such as piracy, Gutierrez said, the Bush administration may find itself hammered by protectionist forces on Capitol Hill irate over currency and trade issues with China.
NEWS
May 15, 2001
KATI SIPP (OpEd column, May 9) is misguided. Free trade improves the quality of life for people in the Third World and lowers the cost of consumer goods here. An individual in a South American slum will never enjoy the quality of life we enjoy here, but working in a factory for $3 a day is better than not working at all. Sipp decries "corporate- driven globalization," nothing but a shallow slogan intended to frighten and to rally support for the type of socialist protectionism she no doubt supports.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1999 | By Al Haas, INQUIRER AUTOMOTIVE WRITER
The chairman of DaimlerChrysler told a Philadelphia audience yesterday that Europe and the United States ought to form a "Transatlantic Free Trade Area" to deal with the rising tide of protectionism on both sides of the Atlantic. "Isn't it ironic that at a moment when . . . German and American soldiers are fighting side by side in the NATO Alliance, Europe and the U.S. are at daggers drawn over trade issues?" Juergen E. Schrempp asked in a speech at the Union League marking the World Affairs Council's 50th anniversary.
BUSINESS
March 17, 1999 | By Robert A. Rankin, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Across the nation, cries for protection from competition in foreign trade are suddenly echoing loudly. One reflection of that is that a bipartisan House majority is expected to vote today for a bill that would impose strict quotas on imports of foreign-made steel. Separately, the Clinton administration early this month imposed $520 million in penalties on a variety of European imports, escalating a six-year-old trade skirmish that started over bananas. Moreover, Republican presidential candidate Pat Buchanan echoes Democratic liberals on the left with his populist appeal to blue-collar workers left behind by the global economy.
NEWS
March 8, 1996
Sadly, we haven't seen the last of Pat Buchanan. But if this week's GOP primaries did nothing else - besides, obviously, repairing Bob Dole's front-runner status - they showed the limits of the political Frankenstein that was getting to be called Buchananism. It is part honest anger at fat cats who get put on the cover of Time for firing hard-working parents, part blame-Mexico-first-ism and part holier-than-thou mullahism. In other words, a dangerous, high-octane stew, the dumbest ingredient of which was Mr. Buchanan's proposed economic "solution" - a draw-up-the-bridges, Fortress America protectionism.
NEWS
February 22, 1996
Pat Buchanan's low-budget, high-voltage crusade is storming the Republican ramparts. His shocker in New Hampshire was fueled by gut-level talk that hit home with citizens who feel abandoned by the political and corporate establishment. Voters who hate abortion, for example, but have been snookered by lip service in the past, sense Mr. Buchanan is one guy who'd really attack Roe v. Wade. But what distinguishes Mr. Buchanan most from the GOP pack, what lets him argue he could broaden the party, is this: He's the only Republican candidate tuned in to the economic fears of ordinary people.
NEWS
May 18, 1993 | By STANLEY A. WEISS
If President Clinton is looking for a way to stimulate the economy in the wake of the defeat of his spending package at the hands of filibustering Senate Republicans, he need not look far. The pending North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) would significantly boost the economy without increasing government spending or raising the national debt. Ratifying NAFTA won't be easy, however. It is opposed by organized labor and its allies on Capitol Hill. And Ross Perot has threatened a blitzkrieg.
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