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FOOD
February 25, 1987 | By JANE FONDA, Special to the Daily News
Editor's note: Jane Fonda, like millions of other American women, once put herself through a debilitating cycle of crash diets, pills and binges in the effort to achieve an "ideal" figure. She learned the hard way that the real goal is in achieving your best and healthiest self - losing fat but retaining muscle, raising your metabolism and lowering your natural set-point weight. Now, in "Jane Fonda's New Workout and Weight Loss Program," she makes her hard-won knowledge available to everyone.
FOOD
May 28, 2000 | By Marie Oser, FOR THE INQUIRER
More fruits, vegetables and salads are being introduced into the diet as people are reducing the amount of meat they eat - and, in many cases, doing away with meat completely. Vegetarians eat no meat in any form; vegans, or "pure vegetarians," eliminate dairy products as well. This always brings up the question, "Where do you get your protein?" There are many sources of protein in the plant kingdom. Nuts, peanut butter, tofu and legumes are all excellent sources of protein.
NEWS
January 23, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: What causes my urine to have a lot of foam? Is it serious? Answer: Have you ever had lemon meringue pie? Those tall peaks of frothy white that make up meringue are made from two simple ingredients: sugar and egg whites. When whipped, egg whites will at first foam, and then stiffen into white peaks with continued beating. That's a result of the unique properties of the albumin protein of egg whites. It's normal to have a trace of protein in standing urine, which foams like meringue as the urine mixes with the water in the toilet.
NEWS
November 24, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most people who get a concussion seem to regain normal brain function within a month or two at most. But doctors have no way to predict which patients are in that group and which will suffer long-term cognitive problems. A team from the University of Pennsylvania and Baylor College of Medicine seeks to solve that riddle with a simple blood test. In a new study in the journal Frontiers in Neurology, the team reported that a protein called SNTF is a promising indicator of which patients with concussions are likely to experience chronic brain deficits.
NEWS
February 23, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the hot trends in cancer medicine is using tiny particles to deliver drugs directly to a tumor, rather than bombarding the whole body with chemotherapy. But the immune system treats these nanoparticles as foreign invaders, so it tries to clear them before they can do their job. The solution, says a team of University of Pennsylvania researchers, is to make the foreign particles seem like natives. The group reported Thursday it had done just that in lab mice, attaching customized protein fragments to the particles that tricked the animals' immune-system "border guards" into relaxing their vigilance.
NEWS
October 3, 2011 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: What do the "BUN" and "creatinine" lab tests mean? Answer: BUN stands for "Blood Urea Nitrogen" and represents a breakdown product of protein digestion. Protein is digested into amino acids. Amino acids contain nitrogen, which is split off to form ammonia waste, while the rest of the amino acid is used to provide calories (fuel) for your body. The liver helps in this protein breakdown, eventually combining the ammonia waste to form the main waste product of protein breakdown: urea.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2011
"THE QUESTION" has been around for a while. Back in the mid-'80s, I must have been vegetarian for a good 72 hours before I first heard it. You know the one: "Where do you get your protein?" I guess the logical equation for meat-eaters is that, since meat is rich in protein, a diet without it must be deficient in this essential nutrient, unless there's some secret, quasi-magical source veggie folks have for procuring it. Well, folks, yes, there is indeed a secret, quasi-magical source of veggie protein, and I'm going to break the code of silence and share it with you. Ready?
SPORTS
July 8, 2013
Tip of the Week   Summer eating Barbecues are a great part of summer. Here are some tips about what to eat and what not to eat: Don't eat . . . ribs. They are one of the worst foods on the menu because they are much higher in fat than they are in protein. If you have a craving for ribs, make them baby back as opposed to spare ribs. Eat . . . grilled or rotisserie chicken (sans skin). This is the best entree because it is loaded with lean protein, which also helps you feel fuller longer so you don't munch on excess calories.
NEWS
June 3, 2011 | By Mary Clare Jalonick, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - There's a new U.S. symbol for healthful eating: The Agriculture Department unveiled "My Plate" on Thursday, abandoning the food pyramid that had guided many Americans but merely confused others. The new guide is divided into four different-sized quadrants, with fruits and vegetables taking up half the space and grains and protein making up the other half. The vegetables and grains portions are the largest of the four. Gone are the old pyramid's references to sugars, fats, or oils.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2012 | Tom Avril
A common type of lab test used in research and medicine can be made three million times more sensitive, raising hopes that certain cancers and Alzheimer's disease can be detected earlier. That is the conclusion of new research by Princeton University engineers, published in the journal Analytical Chemistry, which describes an improved lab test that uses nanotechnology. The test is called a fluorescent immunoassay, a laboratory staple for decades. It relies on antibodies that bind with specific proteins or biomarkers in a sample of fluid, such as blood or urine.
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NEWS
January 18, 2015
ISSUE | FREE SPEECH Echoes of Penn Penn professor Anne Norton purports to protect speech but not bigotry, yet confuses both and protects neither ("Protect free speech, but don't defend bigotry," Jan. 14). Norton's model appears to be her employer, the University of Pennsylvania, which The Inquirer once branded as the nation's most politically correct university. That stemmed from a student's use of the term "water buffalo," for which Penn acted to expel him for violating its speech code.
NEWS
February 14, 2014
FORGET those chocolate beers that are all the rage on Valentine's Day. Those are for lovey-dovey sweethearts. If you want to get into the libidinous spirit of Cupid's heart-piercing arrow, there's only one brew for you: Blood Beer. Yeah, I'm talking about really red ale. Straight from the vein. Plasma Porter. Clot Rot. A transfusion on tap that'll have you all hopped up on hemoglobin. This is no fictional brand out of "True Blood," either. Blood Beer is a real thing.
NEWS
November 24, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most people who get a concussion seem to regain normal brain function within a month or two at most. But doctors have no way to predict which patients are in that group and which will suffer long-term cognitive problems. A team from the University of Pennsylvania and Baylor College of Medicine seeks to solve that riddle with a simple blood test. In a new study in the journal Frontiers in Neurology, the team reported that a protein called SNTF is a promising indicator of which patients with concussions are likely to experience chronic brain deficits.
SPORTS
July 8, 2013
Tip of the Week   Summer eating Barbecues are a great part of summer. Here are some tips about what to eat and what not to eat: Don't eat . . . ribs. They are one of the worst foods on the menu because they are much higher in fat than they are in protein. If you have a craving for ribs, make them baby back as opposed to spare ribs. Eat . . . grilled or rotisserie chicken (sans skin). This is the best entree because it is loaded with lean protein, which also helps you feel fuller longer so you don't munch on excess calories.
NEWS
February 23, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the hot trends in cancer medicine is using tiny particles to deliver drugs directly to a tumor, rather than bombarding the whole body with chemotherapy. But the immune system treats these nanoparticles as foreign invaders, so it tries to clear them before they can do their job. The solution, says a team of University of Pennsylvania researchers, is to make the foreign particles seem like natives. The group reported Thursday it had done just that in lab mice, attaching customized protein fragments to the particles that tricked the animals' immune-system "border guards" into relaxing their vigilance.
FOOD
January 17, 2013 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
Dried beans, the once-humble legumes that have been considered magical since the tale of Jack and the Beanstalk, are rising to superstar status as chefs and home cooks rediscover their value as a cheap, healthy protein, especially as Americans are eating less meat. For health as well as environmental reasons, in a supporting role or in the center of the plate, people are eating more beans, says Linda Smithson, cofounder of FoodWatch. Garbanzo, navy, black, cannellini, no matter the variety, these old reliables all satisfy the growing number of people choosing or requiring a specialized diet: vegan, vegetarian, diabetic, gluten-free, lactose intolerant, or the ever popular flexitarian - choosing to be any of the above when the mood strikes.
NEWS
November 2, 2012
A COUPLE OF weeks ago, I stood beside chef David Silver as he handed out samples of a new product at the Callowhill Whole Foods Market. "What is it?" one gray-haired fellow inquired, taking a bite. "It's Beyond Meat," said Silver, seeming to allow the guy another chew or two before adding, "It's a vegan meat. " Rather than responding with a comical spit-take, the man nodded cheerily and said, "Well, I don't like 'vegan' - but I like this!" Silver has heard that a lot, traveling around the region training staff and whipping up recipes to showcase the new product, one that aspires to compete with meat on its own terms.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2012 | Tom Avril
A common type of lab test used in research and medicine can be made three million times more sensitive, raising hopes that certain cancers and Alzheimer's disease can be detected earlier. That is the conclusion of new research by Princeton University engineers, published in the journal Analytical Chemistry, which describes an improved lab test that uses nanotechnology. The test is called a fluorescent immunoassay, a laboratory staple for decades. It relies on antibodies that bind with specific proteins or biomarkers in a sample of fluid, such as blood or urine.
NEWS
January 23, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: What causes my urine to have a lot of foam? Is it serious? Answer: Have you ever had lemon meringue pie? Those tall peaks of frothy white that make up meringue are made from two simple ingredients: sugar and egg whites. When whipped, egg whites will at first foam, and then stiffen into white peaks with continued beating. That's a result of the unique properties of the albumin protein of egg whites. It's normal to have a trace of protein in standing urine, which foams like meringue as the urine mixes with the water in the toilet.
NEWS
October 3, 2011 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: What do the "BUN" and "creatinine" lab tests mean? Answer: BUN stands for "Blood Urea Nitrogen" and represents a breakdown product of protein digestion. Protein is digested into amino acids. Amino acids contain nitrogen, which is split off to form ammonia waste, while the rest of the amino acid is used to provide calories (fuel) for your body. The liver helps in this protein breakdown, eventually combining the ammonia waste to form the main waste product of protein breakdown: urea.
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