CollectionsProtest
IN THE NEWS

Protest

NEWS
December 13, 2015 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Chris Brennan, and Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Staff Writers
NEW YORK - Donald Trump avoided incendiary comments about Muslims and pivoted to economic issues in a speech to the Pennsylvania Republican Party on Friday afternoon, but he was interrupted several times by protesters, some who had crashed the event and others who had purchased tickets to the $1,000-per-plate luncheon. Security officers at the Plaza Hotel quickly swarmed the demonstrators and wrestled violently with members of one group, trying to pull away a banner that read, "Islamaphobia and Arabphobia Are Violence.
NEWS
December 5, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chester County officials announced Thursday they will immediately stop payments to the state until legislators pass a budget, following the lead of Bucks County. Other counties have threatened similar actions. The county has been using its reserves to pay for human services. But as of Jan. 1, there will be no more funding for human-services providers, the county commissioners said. "Even for Chester County, we are at the breaking point," Commissioner Michelle Kichline said. The county's solicitor will investigate legal actions the county can take against the Commonwealth for failing to provide funding, they said.
NEWS
November 23, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
LAST WEEK'S PARIS massacre by terrorists has given rise to a growing tide of racism against Syrian refugees in the U.S. and Europe, and has resulted in innocent civilians in Syria being bombed by the French, said members of a coalition of civil rights and anti-war groups that rallied outside Philadelphia City Hall yesterday evening. "First of all, f--- Donald Trump, down with racism and down with fascism," Scott Williams, 27, a member of the International Action Center, said into a microphone to about 70 protesters - some of whom covered their faces with bandanas while waving the red, black and green Pan-African flag.
BUSINESS
November 21, 2015 | Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor-elect Jim Kenney said Thursday he favors a $15 an hour minimum wage in Philadelphia, but thinks the "best way" to get that is for workers to organize in labor unions and collectively bargain with employers. Kenney, whose father was a unionized firefighter, told more than 200 cheering nonunion Philadelphia International Airport workers that when he takes office in January "some things are going to change around here. " Private firms that have contracts with airlines to provide skycaps, wheelchair attendants, baggage handlers and aircraft cabin cleaners - the nonunion workers in the protest - will be required to pay their employees $12 an hour.
NEWS
November 20, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
HUNDREDS OF THE lowest-paid employees at Philadelphia International Airport walked off the job for 24 hours starting late Wednesday night to protest for higher pay and better working conditions. Although the work action by nonunionized employees of three companies that have subcontracts with airlines did not disrupt flights, said a spokeswomen for the airport and its largest tenant, American Airlines, the workers drew influential allies to their cause. A handful of City Council members were at the airport yesterday morning to stand with the baggage handlers, cabin cleaners, wheelchair attendants and others - as was Mayor-elect Jim Kenney.
NEWS
November 18, 2015 | Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
A coalition of advocacy groups gathered outside City Hall on Monday to decry an anticipated city policy change that would renew cooperation among Philadelphia police, local jails, and federal immigration agents. The reversal, less than 18 months after Mayor Nutter banned such cooperation, is expected to be announced in the waning days of his administration, which ends Jan. 4. "We won't allow Michael Nutter to throw our communities under the bus in the eleventh hour," said Erika Almiron, executive director of the Latino rights group Juntos.
NEWS
November 14, 2015 | By Dani Blum, Inquirer Staff Writer
About 300 students from the University of Pennsylvania, Drexel, Temple, and other colleges in the Philadelphia area joined in a mass protest Thursday, echoing movements around the nation against racial issues at the University of Missouri and Yale University. "This is what democracy looks like!" some chanted. "Who are we? We are Yale! Who are we? We are Mizzou!" The larger protest arose from two groups, starting with a much smaller Million Student March at Penn inspired by rallies around the country on economic issues, particularly huge student-loan debt.
NEWS
November 12, 2015 | BY JOHN SMALLWOOD, Daily News Columnist
EVERY COLLEGE that relies on the revenue generated from college football or basketball programs should take keen interest in what just happened at the University of Missouri. In an act worthy of the spirit of the Montgomery, Ala., bus boycott during the civil rights movement, more than 30 black players brought down the university's president, Timothy M. Wolfe, and chancellor R. Bowen Loftin by simply saying they would no longer participate. Whether or not you agree with the result of this student protest, it was a clear example of the football players recognizing the influence they had over the university and using it to effect change.
NEWS
October 25, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Criticizing the decision to arm campus police - and the way in which it was made - about 150 Villanova University students, faculty, and staff staged a peaceful protest Friday. The move to give campus officers guns violates Catholic precepts, said the Rev. Allan Fitzgerald, director of the Augustinian Institute and a member of the theology department. "Rather than offer the principles of the NRA - more guns, less violence - we need to affirm the Catholic principles of peace and justice," he said.
NEWS
October 23, 2015 | BY DAN SPINELLI, Daily News Staff Writer spineld@phillynews.com, 215-854-5906
The national conversation on gun violence in and around schools took another detour to Philadelphia yesterday as more than 50 clergymen, students and parents marched from Masterman High School to a North Philadelphia pistol range. "We could be a world where we don't need guns for self-protection," said the Rev. Charles Howard, the University of Pennsylvania's chaplain, as protesters congregated outside the Gun Range, on Percy Street near Spring Garden. Howard spoke alongside other religious leaders from Heeding God's Call, a group supporting greater regulation of guns.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|