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Protest

NEWS
February 20, 2014 | By Seth Zweifler, Inquirer Staff Writer
In what looked more like a lively fitness class than a protest, a group of about 40 Pennsylvania health care advocates, unionized workers, and uninsured Philadelphians took their cause to Gov. Corbett's Center City office Tuesday. For about a half-hour around lunchtime, protesters lining South Broad Street pumped their fists, spun in circles, and passed out yellow pamphlets in trying to convince passersby that Corbett's plan to overhaul Medicaid - a key part of the Healthy Pennsylvania campaign that the governor has touted for months - is no more than a poorly disguised Trojan horse for policies they consider stingy.
NEWS
February 18, 2014 | BY NAVEED AHSAN, Daily News Staff Writer ahsann@phillynews.com, 215-854-5904
DOZENS of demonstrators mobilized in front of the Liberty Bell yesterday afternoon in support of the anti-government protests that have erupted in Venezuela. Protests in solidarity with the people in the South American nation have been increasing steadily since 66 people were injured in riots around the country and three were shot dead in its capital, Caracas, on Wednesday. "Crime is out of proportion, there is a food shortage and there are laws implemented by the government to restrict the media," protest organizer Emilio Buitrago, who moved to Philadelphia from Venezuela 17 years ago, said yesterday.
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
About 60 teachers, parents, and community members protested proposed changes in the Camden School District in freezing temperatures before a school board meeting Tuesday night. Chanting "Whose schools? Our schools!" and "Fired up, ready to go," the crowd walked from Camden High School to the Preston O.R. Toliver II Broadcast Center, 1600 Pine St., where the meetings are held and streamed. The group was mostly against the proposal for more "Renaissance" schools - publicly funded, privately managed charter-like schools.
NEWS
January 28, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Hundreds of vehicles, some from as far away as New York and Washington, rallied from the Ukrainian Educational and Cultural Center in Jenkintown to Independence National Historical Park on Sunday in support of antigovernment protesters in the beleaguered former Soviet republic. "I feel I have to be in Ukraine at this moment and I can't. I feel I have to stand with all those people and I can't," said rally organizer Olena Mishchuk, 31, of Northeast Philadelphia. Instead, she and hundreds of native Ukrainians assembled at the center, their vehicles decorated with ribbons and their country's blue-and-yellow flags, and formed a caravan that snaked out of the overflowing parking lot and headed south on Route 611. The cars then cruised south on Broad Street to City Hall, went by the Liberty Bell and the Museum of Art before doubling back to the Ukrainian Catholic Church of the Immaculate Conception on North Franklin Street.
NEWS
January 27, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
The deaths last week of antigovernment demonstrators in Ukraine rocked the former Soviet republic and shocked the large Ukrainian immigrant community of Philadelphia and its suburbs. Pennsylvania has the nation's second-largest Ukrainian-descended population, after New York. New Jersey ranks fourth. "We were raised in households that told us to remember where we came from, cherish our heritage, and keep it going," said Zoriana Strockyj, 21, of Philadelphia, a Temple University junior.
NEWS
January 25, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
TRENTON Frigid temperatures, a looming snowstorm, and a set of jitters did not stop the grandfather of a 2-year-old medical-marijuana cardholder from showing up at Gov. Christie's swearing-in this week. Gene Gatens, a carpenter from Brick, Ocean County, was among a small crowd of 30 protesters to stake out a spot Tuesday near the War Memorial. He hoisted a homemade plywood sign that read, "Don't Force Families to Move for Medicine. " It was Gatens' first experience as a demonstrator and ended up eye-opening and bittersweet.
NEWS
January 19, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
A SWARM of protesters who gathered outside Central High School yesterday morning in anticipation of Gov. Corbett's first visit to a district-run Philadelphia public school found a bit of irony: a no-show governor. Corbett, who has been criticized for cutting nearly $1 billion from education during his time in office, abruptly canceled the appearance. Instead, he held a news conference at his Center City office, claiming he did want to cause a distraction. "I don't run from anything," Corbett said.
NEWS
January 19, 2014 | By Jennifer Lin and Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Staff Writers
With a burst of boos and chants of "We Will Vote," more than 300 protesters expressed outrage and disappointment after Gov. Corbett canceled an appearance Friday with seniors at Central High School. The governor changed his plans at the last minute, citing concerns about "any theatrics the adults had planned. " But the theatrics had only just begun. Before 10 a.m., a crowd of parents, alumni, School District employees, and religious and civic leaders began marching from Broad Street and Olney Avenue to Central, expecting to confront the governor about a lack of school funding as he arrived at the high school.
NEWS
January 17, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
IT WILL BE a day of firsts for Gov. Corbett when he steps inside Central High School this morning: First visit to a Philadelphia public school since assuming office in 2011; first sitting Pennsylvania governor to visit Central; and, probably, the first time Corbett will be greeted by angry protesters inside and outside a school. Student protesters will rally at 7:45 a.m. outside the Olney school, reading their Declaration of Students' Rights written by senior organizer Afaq Mahmoud.
BUSINESS
December 22, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Several dozen protesters carrying placards reading "Local People, Local Jobs" marched Friday at Eighth and Market Streets, complaining that Aker Philadelphia Shipyard and its scaffolding contractor had turned their backs on local workers. The timing came as a surprise because, while many members of Aker's regular unionized workforce were laid off during the recession and a downturn in shipbuilding in 2010, they have been recalled and are back on the job. Employment at the nation's second-largest commercial shipbuilder is 1,100 - what it was in July 2010.
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