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Protocols

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2005 | By BOB STRAUSS Los Angeles Daily News
Shortly after the 9/11 terrorist attacks, an Egyptian cab driver told documentary filmmaker Marc Levin that no Jews were killed at the World Trade Center because they were all warned not to go to work that day. This widely spread fallacy got Levin ("SLAM") thinking about the odious uptick in anti-Semitic rhetoric that has occurred since that awful day. Many who believe the WTC lie argue that it was predicted in "The Protocols of the Elders of Zion," the book made up by members of the Russian secret service in the late 19th century.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2005 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Dreamed up by Russian secret police at the turn of the last century, The Protocols of the Elders of Zion is a book that purports to be the work of Jewish masterminds, mapping out a devious plan of world domination. Marc Levin's unsettling first-person documentary, Protocols of Zion, examines how this long-acknowledged fake - said to have inspired Hitler - is still taken as the real thing by many groups, and how the document is still readily available today on bookshelves and the Internet.
NEWS
December 9, 2009 | By Robert Moran, Kia Gregory and Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Aria Health executives said yesterday that staff members did not violate protocols in dealing with Joaquin Rivera, the 63-year-old man who died while waiting for care in the health system's Frankford hospital, but added that protocols would be changed in the hope of avoiding another waiting-room death. City Councilwoman Maria Qui?ones S?nchez and State Rep. Tony Payton Jr. said last night that Aria officials made the statements to them at a briefing in her City Hall office. Representing Aria were Roy Powell, chief executive officer; Linde Finsrud-Wilson, chief operating officer; and Raphael Villalobos, chief financial officer.
NEWS
May 7, 2008 | By Adrienne Lu and Maya Rao INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Six racehorses from a Burlington County farm were the first to test positive for performance-enhancing drugs under New Jersey's new drug-testing protocols, the state Attorney General's office announced yesterday. Late last year, the New Jersey Racing Commission changed its rules to allow horses to be tested for drugs on farms and at any time. Previously, horses could only be tested on New Jersey's four racetracks and only on the day of competition. The harness-race horses from Winner's International Farm in Chesterfield tested positive last month for Erythropoietin, also known as EPO, which can enhance oxygen consumption but can also lead to heart attack or stroke.
NEWS
October 27, 1993 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
Is there any chance that the Western news media might soon outgrow the simplistic and simple-minded variety of newspeak that has come into vogue since the collapse of the Soviet Union? We should hope so, because it's masking some incipient political cancers that need to be isolated before they spread. Newspeak, as the term was coined by futuristic novelist George Orwell, is the manipulation of language to confuse and mislead the public. In Orwell's "1984" it was employed deliberately by a totalitarian government.
NEWS
November 4, 2002 | By Ashraf Khalil FOR THE INQUIRER
Muhammed Sobhi seems genuinely puzzled by all the fuss about his latest TV project, a 41-part historical drama scheduled to start this week during the television-intensive holy month of Ramadan. "The whole issue doesn't deserve five minutes on the headline news," the popular actor and director said last week. "The bigger issues we should talk about are the events in Palestine and the decision to attack Iraq. " Nevertheless, Sobhi finds himself - along with the Egyptian government, whose censors approved the production - at the center of a gathering controversy.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
The South Jersey Behavioral Health Innovation Collaborative on Monday announced pilot programs to develop better-coordinated care for people with mental-health and substance-abuse disorders. Among the recommended pilots underway or soon to be launched are: conferencing on complex cases, sharing protocols and quality measures across the region, the integration of psychiatric specialists into emergency departments, and recovery-oriented housing. The collaborative, started in 2014, includes Cooper University Health Care, Inspira Health Network, Kennedy Health, Lourdes Health System, and Virtua.
SPORTS
September 7, 2006 | Daily News Wire Services
The backup drug test for sprinter Marion Jones came back negative, clearing the five-time Olympic champion of doping allegations that have dogged her for the past month, her attorneys said last night. "I am absolutely ecstatic," Jones said in a statement released by her lawyers. "I have always maintained that I have never, ever taken performance-enhancing drugs, and I am pleased that a scientific process has now demonstrated that fact. " Jones tested positive for the banned endurance enhancer EPO on June 23 at the U.S. Track and Field Championships.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2011 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
History may be filled with the words and deeds of great individuals, says Italian philosopher and novelist Umberto Eco, but it is also shaped by lies, falsities, deceit. "To lie is a typically human activity," says Eco, a semiotician who studies how we use signs, symbols, and words to communicate both truth and lies. "Sometimes it's more important than telling the truth. " Eco takes on one of history's most insidious and influential fabrications in his latest novel, The Prague Cemetery , a meticulously researched, if overgrown, pastiche about the genesis of The Protocols of the Elders of Zion , the anti-Semitic 1903 Russian screed that helped inspire Hitler's genocide of the Jews.
NEWS
September 27, 2012 | By Amy Worden, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - Two Pennsylvania newspapers asked a federal court Wednesday to literally pull back the curtain on the state's execution chamber and allow witnesses to see the whole procedure. The suit, filed by The Philadelphia Inquirer and the Patriot-News of Harrisburg, says the state's Department of Corrections is violating the constitution by preventing witnesses to the state's first execution in 13 years - scheduled for next week - from observing the entire process. The execution protocols issued in 2010 allow witnesses, which include six members of the media, to see only the brief period during which the lethal injection is administered and that a curtain would be drawn to bar them from seeing what goes on up until that point or immediately after, the suit says.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 2, 2016 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Staff Writer
What happened at the Cincinnati Zoo this weekend - when a child fell into a primate enclosure prompting zoo staff to shoot a beloved gorilla - is something local zoo officials plan and train for but at the same time hope will never happen. "It was a tough situation, but they made the right call," said Shaun Rogers, marketing director of Elmwood Park Zoo in Norristown. Philadelphia Zoo officials plan to hold a meeting this week to evaluate their own operation in light of the Cincinnati incident, said Andy Baker, the zoo's chief operating officer and a primatologist.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
The South Jersey Behavioral Health Innovation Collaborative on Monday announced pilot programs to develop better-coordinated care for people with mental-health and substance-abuse disorders. Among the recommended pilots underway or soon to be launched are: conferencing on complex cases, sharing protocols and quality measures across the region, the integration of psychiatric specialists into emergency departments, and recovery-oriented housing. The collaborative, started in 2014, includes Cooper University Health Care, Inspira Health Network, Kennedy Health, Lourdes Health System, and Virtua.
NEWS
March 17, 2016 | By Maddie Hanna, TRENTON BUREAU
LINDEN, N.J. - Even if he hadn't been campaigning with Donald Trump, Gov. Christie says, he wouldn't have attended Monday's funeral for State Trooper Sean Cullen. Christie, who drew criticism for campaigning out of state on the day of the Burlington County funeral, said at a news conference Tuesday that he and Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno had decided that Guadagno would attend, even before he had plans to travel with Trump. "This is our normal protocol," Christie said in Linden, where he promoted the meal-delivery company HelloFresh's expansion with the help of state tax credits.
NEWS
December 30, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tom Casey continuously fields calls and e-mails from anxious people asking about pipeline projects and safety, and the meaning of a right of way. So Casey, of West Goshen, who helped start the Chester County Community Coalition to spread information about pipelines, turns to the county's online Pipeline Information Center. Fortunately for Casey and others interested, Chester County officials recently got a $50,000 federal grant to add information to the website and to name a point of contact to increase information-sharing among residents, municipalities, and pipeline companies.
NEWS
September 6, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Montgomery County prison officials are investigating Tuesday's inmate escape to determine whether any safety protocols were broken or inadequate. Sometime after noon Monday, Raehib Hankerson was outside in a secured yard, where he "was able to manipulate the wire fencing . . . crawl through the fence, and escape," the District Attorney's Office said in a news release. County detectives and four local police departments went searching for Hankerson. He was found about two hours later in a wooded area near Eagleville Road and Ridge Pike, the District Attorney's Office said.
NEWS
October 20, 2013 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anna Cassieri waited Wednesday for her phone to ring with word that her 3-year-old daughter, Aryana, had arrived home from her first trip to see her father in West Philadelphia. For two weeks, the little girl had stayed with her father, Armone Stanley, going on day trips to the pool and Chuck E. Cheese's. The visit was over, though, and father and daughter were scheduled to be on an early flight Wednesday to Florida, where Aryana lives with her mother in Broward County. Hours passed without word, and Stanley wasn't picking up Cassieri's calls.
NEWS
December 28, 2012 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
I RIDE SEPTA's regional-rail system. The trains are clean enough and mostly on time.Conductors are polite and helpful, give or take a grump. So, I wasn't sure what to make of the clown of a conductor I came across the other night. Was he some jokester? A jerk? A disgruntled employee? I'm thinking all three. You tell me. I stepped onto the 6:43 p.m. Chestnut Hill West train from Market East and nearly plowed into the woman in front of me. Before I could give her the "tourist much?"
NEWS
October 9, 2012
RE: "Your rights vs. your privileges" (editorial, Oct. 2). There are many rights guaranteed by the Constitution, including the right to bear arms and the right to a jury of my peers. Is the author suggesting that those rights should not require identification? Or does the author wish to handpick which rights require identification? I agree that voting is an essential right, a right that those ineligible to vote are not entitled to. T.L. Gordon Drexel Hill Re: Christine Flowers "Right to Vote" column (Oct.
NEWS
September 27, 2012 | By Amy Worden, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - Two Pennsylvania newspapers asked a federal court Wednesday to literally pull back the curtain on the state's execution chamber and allow witnesses to see the whole procedure. The suit, filed by The Philadelphia Inquirer and the Patriot-News of Harrisburg, says the state's Department of Corrections is violating the constitution by preventing witnesses to the state's first execution in 13 years - scheduled for next week - from observing the entire process. The execution protocols issued in 2010 allow witnesses, which include six members of the media, to see only the brief period during which the lethal injection is administered and that a curtain would be drawn to bar them from seeing what goes on up until that point or immediately after, the suit says.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2011 | BY GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
IN THE NEW "Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol," Tom Cruise and friends traverse the globe trying to recover stolen launch codes for Russian ICBMs. It made me wonder: Are the Russians still running Windows 98? I ask because here at the Daily News , where we do not launch ICBMs, we have to change our passwords every other day, and re-enter it every time we leave the desk for two freaking minutes. I mean, if someone stole your ICBM launch codes, wouldn't you . . . change them?
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