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Prototype

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BUSINESS
August 13, 2011 | By Joe Mandak, Associated Press
BUTLER, Pa. - Thirty miles north of Pittsburgh, where industrial giants such as U.S. Steel were just beginning to forge the metallic backbone of the nation's World War II machine, a tiny company that made even tinier cars developed the prototype for a vehicle that would revolutionize the way soldiers traveled: the Jeep. The inaugural Bantam Jeep Heritage Festival, which runs through Sunday, celebrates the four-wheeled warrior with a parade of more than 1,200 of them; a "playground" where aficionados can drive over rocky obstacles, hills, and bridges; and fairlike entertainment and eats.
NEWS
July 4, 1986 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / STEPHEN SHAMES
STRIKING A HEROIC POSE, Samara Gathers, 8, of Philadelphia, stands below a prototype F-16 Falcon, which is on display at Independence Mall for the July Fourth festivities.
NEWS
February 3, 2015
Y ASMINE MUSTAFA, 32, of University City, and Anthony Gold, 49, of West Chester, co-founded Roar for Good, a University City firm aimed at empowering women with fashionable safety accessories and educational programs. The startup is part of DreamIt Athena, a female-focused entrepreneur program by DreamIt Ventures. I spoke with Mustafa, the CEO. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for Roar? A: A woman was raped a block from my apartment shortly after I came back from a trip to South America last year.
NEWS
August 1, 2005 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than 40 years ago, the children played along Rancocas Creek at Riverside and remember seeing the strange, half-buried cylinder that jutted from the marsh. They clambered up its rusty sides and stood on the tapered end. Was it a smokestack, a sewer pipe? Why the tapered end? Why the large hinged hatch? Joined by a historian and archivist, some of those childhood playmates set out over the weekend to again find the object: possibly a Civil War submarine. Based on 19th-century documents, newspaper accounts, interviews and research, the search team said the deteriorating metal cylinder might be the 33-foot prototype of the Navy's first sub, the USS Alligator.
NEWS
December 15, 2005 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Vince Capone wouldn't say whether he had found anything. He just smiled yesterday after towing a $20,000, torpedo-shaped magnetometer over a mound of earth on the Rancocas Creek in Riverside. Local researchers and amateur historians believed the site contained the Civil War prototype of the Navy's first submarine - and hoped Capone, a marine remote-sensing expert, could confirm their suspicions. They had read historical records and period newspapers about the Philadelphia-built sub's being stored along the creek.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1987 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
When you load up your shopping cart in a supermarket that's nearly the size of a football field and that sells appliances and VCRs, roses and greeting cards, prescription drugs and food - be careful. You wouldn't want to put the color TV into the cart on top of the eggs. The new ShopRite Supermarket in the Northeast, near Red Lion Road and Roosevelt Boulevard has about 40,000 square feet of shopping space - and another 15,000 square feet behind the scenes. That conjures images of a casino-like abyss with aisles stretching out before you. But that's exactly what ShopRite decided not to build.
SPORTS
October 4, 2009 | By Robin Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
It would be nice to know Kevin Towers was fired as general manager of the San Diego Padres, but he doesn't know why. Towers figured that chief executive officer Jeff Moorad wants his own hire in the position. "He never really told me exactly the reason why, but I've been around long enough to know why," Towers, who held the job for 14 seasons, told reporters yesterday. After Towers took over as GM, the Padres won four NL West titles and made it to the 1998 World Series, getting swept by the Yankees.
SPORTS
July 26, 2012 | By David Murphy and Daily News Staff Writer
The key factor behind the Phillies dramatic 7-6 victory over Brewers Tuesday night wasn't just the walks that Chase Utley and Ryan Howard drew against Manny Parra to load the bases. It was also the fact that the Milwaukee bullpen still had to deal with Carlos Ruiz and Hunter Pence, who earlier in the season might have been hitting No. 3 and No. 4, with a significant drop off behind them. As Ruiz showed with his game-tying three-run double and Pence showed with his go-ahead bloop single, the Phillies suddenly have a real major league lineup again.
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SPORTS
May 3, 2015 | By Jeff McLane, Inquirer Staff Writer
It had been 13 years since the Eagles drafted a cornerback as high as they did when Eric Rowe was chosen in the second round of the NFL draft on Friday night. And in the time since they chose Lito Sheppard in the 2002 first round, the league has changed significantly. Sheppard was generously listed at 5-foot-10, 194 pounds. Rowe is 6-1, 205 pounds. Sheppard, a two-time Pro Bowler, was a successful pick for then-coach Andy Reid, but he probably wouldn't be considered a first-round prospect in today's NFL, and certainly not by Chip Kelly.
SPORTS
April 25, 2015 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Eagles are days away from their first draft with Chip Kelly making final decisions and Ed Marynowitz as his top personnel executive, and the coach and the vice president of player personnel agree that it's not worth "mortgaging the future" for one player. But Marynowitz conceded that this philosophy does not preclude the Eagles from trading up in the draft, which begins Thursday, and that they "never say never. " "Philosophically, we have eight picks and we would like to pick eight players or more - not less," Marynowitz said Thursday.
NEWS
February 3, 2015
Y ASMINE MUSTAFA, 32, of University City, and Anthony Gold, 49, of West Chester, co-founded Roar for Good, a University City firm aimed at empowering women with fashionable safety accessories and educational programs. The startup is part of DreamIt Athena, a female-focused entrepreneur program by DreamIt Ventures. I spoke with Mustafa, the CEO. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for Roar? A: A woman was raped a block from my apartment shortly after I came back from a trip to South America last year.
SPORTS
July 26, 2012 | By David Murphy and Daily News Staff Writer
The key factor behind the Phillies dramatic 7-6 victory over Brewers Tuesday night wasn't just the walks that Chase Utley and Ryan Howard drew against Manny Parra to load the bases. It was also the fact that the Milwaukee bullpen still had to deal with Carlos Ruiz and Hunter Pence, who earlier in the season might have been hitting No. 3 and No. 4, with a significant drop off behind them. As Ruiz showed with his game-tying three-run double and Pence showed with his go-ahead bloop single, the Phillies suddenly have a real major league lineup again.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2012 | Diane Mastrull
By way of introduction to his offices in Villanova, Edmond Dougherty stops at a desk cluttered with gadgets: various shapes of plastic, a model quadcopter, a linear induction motor, and squares of foam sandwiched by metal film. "It's almost like an island of broken toys," said the president of Ablaze Development Corp. Except that it's all for serious business - for clients ranging from the U.S. military to a variety of private companies. Well, as serious as a guy who wanted to be a stand-up comic is willing to let his workday be. "I figured the best moment in someone's life was when they laughed, so I wanted to make people happy," explained Dougherty, an Overbrook native.
NEWS
August 28, 2011 | By Art Carey, Inquirer Staff Writer
BUTLER, Pa. - The jeep - that sculpture in steel and sheet metal that the Museum of Modern Art once hailed as "the perfect gadget" - is still drawing raves in the town where its legend began. The good citizens of Butler, about 30 miles north of Pittsburgh, are aglow from this month's inaugural Bantam Jeep Heritage Festival. "It was amazing," said Jack Cohen, executive director of the Butler County Tourism and Convention Bureau, organizer of the three-day bash, which attracted jeeps from 28 states and four foreign countries.
BUSINESS
August 13, 2011 | By Joe Mandak, Associated Press
BUTLER, Pa. - Thirty miles north of Pittsburgh, where industrial giants such as U.S. Steel were just beginning to forge the metallic backbone of the nation's World War II machine, a tiny company that made even tinier cars developed the prototype for a vehicle that would revolutionize the way soldiers traveled: the Jeep. The inaugural Bantam Jeep Heritage Festival, which runs through Sunday, celebrates the four-wheeled warrior with a parade of more than 1,200 of them; a "playground" where aficionados can drive over rocky obstacles, hills, and bridges; and fairlike entertainment and eats.
NEWS
August 5, 2011 | By Tim Rohan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
BETHLEHEM, Pa. - Sometimes during meetings Howard Mudd feels the need to impart his wisdom on the latest group of linemen he is trying to mold. He came out of a one-year retirement to coach these guys. This group needs to be a brick wall to protect Michael Vick; that is, an athletic brick wall with quick feet, as Mudd prefers. So Mudd interrupts his meetings to tell stories. Later, rookie center Jason Kelce and his teammates will joke about it. Mudd's almost 70, and he doesn't realize his stories tend to drag on, but his intentions aren't dismissed.
SPORTS
October 5, 2009 | By Kate Fagan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sean Singletary is the only true point guard on the 76ers roster, but the chances that he'll remain there are about as slim as the double teams he routinely splits. Singletary, from Penn Charter and then the University of Virginia, is a 6-foot guard with prototypical guard skills: speed, ballhandling and quickness. But right now, the Sixers' guard spots are loaded with contracted players: Lou Williams, Willie Green, Royal Ivey, Jrue Holiday, even Andre Iguodala, currently playing the two-spot.
SPORTS
October 4, 2009 | By Robin Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
It would be nice to know Kevin Towers was fired as general manager of the San Diego Padres, but he doesn't know why. Towers figured that chief executive officer Jeff Moorad wants his own hire in the position. "He never really told me exactly the reason why, but I've been around long enough to know why," Towers, who held the job for 14 seasons, told reporters yesterday. After Towers took over as GM, the Padres won four NL West titles and made it to the 1998 World Series, getting swept by the Yankees.
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