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NEWS
December 27, 2012 | By Adam Schreck and Qassim Abdul-Zahra, Associated Press
RAMADI, Iraq - Large, noisy demonstrations against Iraq's government flared for the third time in less than a week Wednesday in Iraq's western Anbar province, raising the prospect of a fresh bout of unrest in a onetime al-Qaeda stronghold on Syria's doorstep. The rallies find echoes in the Arab Spring. Protesters chanted "the people want the downfall of the regime," a slogan that has rippled across the region and was fulfilled in Tunisia and Egypt. Other rallying cries blasted Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki's government as illegitimate and warned that protesters "will cut off any hand that touches us. " While the demonstrators' tenacious show of force could signal the start of a more populist Sunni opposition movement, it risks widening the deep and increasingly bitter rifts with the Shiite-led government in Baghdad.
NEWS
May 4, 1986 | By C. S. Manegold, Inquirer Staff Writer
At night, in the hills, the sound of dogs barking echoes from one barrio to the next, signaling trouble - people moving in the darkness, strangers in a land so scarcely populated that strangers do not go unnoticed. During the day, in the valley below, the rumbling of military vehicles drifts from one dry and dying rice paddy to another, signaling troop movements - soldiers grouping and regrouping, preparing for attacks. To the people of Cagayan province in the far northern Philippines, both sounds have the cadence of death.
NEWS
April 4, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
White and black leaders in Natal province yesterday began debating a proposal to create the nation's first racially integrated regional government. In Durban, a conference of 420 delegates started talks on a proposal to combine the white Natal provincial government with that of the KwaZulu black homeland, made up of 25 sections of land scattered across the province. Thirty-one organizations, including Natal's main business groups, attended the opening session of the talks, which are expected to last six months.
NEWS
December 20, 2012 | By Hamza Hendawi, Associated Press
ASSIUT, Egypt - A campaign of intimidation by Islamists left most Christians in this southern province too afraid to participate in last week's referendum on an Islamist-drafted constitution they deeply oppose, residents say. The disenfranchisement is raising Christians' worries over their future under empowered Muslim conservatives. Nearly a week before the vote, some 50,000 Islamists marched through the provincial capital, Assiut, chanting that Egypt will be "Islamic, Islamic, despite the Christians.
NEWS
September 22, 2010 | By Jonathan S. Landay and Dion Nissenbaum, McClatchy Newspapers
KABUL, Afghanistan - Internal reports from Afghanistan's Independent Election Commission on Tuesday provide new evidence of serious fraud in Afghanistan's parliamentary elections, including turnouts that exceeded 100 percent in many southeastern districts under the control of the Taliban or other extremists. One district in Paktika province recorded 626 percent voter turnout, according to reports obtained by McClatchy Newspapers. Also Tuesday, the worst helicopter crash in four years killed nine people, bringing NATO fatalities in Afghanistan in 2010 to 529 and making it the deadliest year since the war began in 2001.
NEWS
May 3, 2010 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Salvatore S. Corma of Wenonah was focused, driven, and selfless, his friends said, the kind of soldier any commander would want on the front lines of battle. Army First Lt. Corma, 24, died on the front lines last week in Afghanistan during an attack in the province of Zabul, which borders Pakistan. Corma, who was assigned to the 2d Battalion, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team of the 82d Airborne Division, based at Fort Bragg, N.C., was killed Thursday when insurgents attacked his unit using improvised explosive devices, according to the Department of Defense.
NEWS
April 20, 2003 | By Ralph Vigoda INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was nearly 6 p.m., a good time to pull into this picturesque community on Nova Scotia's Atlantic Coast. The tourist buses that flood the village each day - any one of which usually carries more people than Peggys Cove's permanent population of 50 - were gone and the sole parking lot was almost empty. There was only one problem: I could barely make out anything through the fog. A dozen or so brave souls, ignoring the signs that warned of the danger of crashing waves, looked like ghosts as they roamed the smooth, grayish-white boulders that have been withstanding the assault of the ocean for eons.
NEWS
February 23, 2012 | By Rahim Faiez and Heidi Vogt, Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan - Clashes between Afghan troops and protesters angry over the burning of Muslim holy books at a U.S. military base left at least seven people dead and dozens wounded Wednesday, as anger spread despite U.S. apologies over what it said was a mistake. The demonstrations across four eastern provinces illustrated the intensity of Afghans' anger at what they saw as foreign forces flouting their laws and insulting their culture. The violence was also a reminder of how easily Afghan-U.S.
NEWS
October 26, 1995 | By Michael Matza, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Inside the Bijouterie Portuguaise, Antonio Couto has mothballed his manufacturing equipment and stopped ordering raw gold. His jewelry store is open, but customers stay away. With Quebec preparing to vote Monday on whether to secede from Canada, separation anxiety in Montreal's immigrant-rich East End is running high, Couto says. Steven Lan, a Taiwanese immigrant and businessman in Montreal's vibrant Chinatown, also feels the strain. "I'm a young man. I came here to start my business.
NEWS
February 23, 2002 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
His voice was weak, almost trembling. He stood unsteadily in black Nikes and gestured passionately, stabbing the air with freckled hands. But Cuban President Fidel Castro, 75, had his audience of three dozen giddy Pennsylvanians enthralled. They had come to Matanzas' city hall on Thursday for a ceremony declaring Pennsylvania the "sister state" of Cuba's Matanzas province, the latest move in a widening American grassroots assault on the four-decade-old U.S. embargo on Cuba.
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NEWS
August 10, 2014
A Travel story last Sunday misstated the location of Canada's Gaspé Peninsula. It is in the province of Quebec.
NEWS
July 12, 2013 | By Hamza Hendawi, Associated Press
CAIRO - With a mob of Muslim extremists on their tail, the Christian businessman and his nephew climbed up on the roof and ran for their lives, jumping from building to building in their southern Egyptian village. Finally they ran out of rooftops. Forced back onto the street, they were overwhelmed by several dozen men. The attackers hacked them with axes and beat them with clubs and tree limbs, killing Emile Naseem, 41. The nephew survived with wounds to his shoulders and head and recounted the chase to the Associated Press.
NEWS
July 5, 2013 | By Diaa Hadid, Associated Press
BEIRUT, Lebanon - The Syrian military dropped leaflets on opposition-held territory in the country's north Wednesday, urging rebel fighters to surrender as the two sides fought for control of a major highway. The psychological tactics are part of a relentless regime offensive against rebel forces that have recently acquired shipments of badly needed advanced weaponry from Gulf Arab states. Similar campaigns in the past to reach out to rebels through leaflets and text messages failed to achieve results.
NEWS
July 1, 2013 | By Sarah El Deeb, Associated Press
BEIRUT - Rebels captured a major army post in the southern city of Daraa on Friday after nearly two weeks of intense fighting, as battles raged between troops and opposition forces in the province that borders Jordan, activists said. Daraa, the provincial capital of a region that carries the same name, is the birthplace of the uprising against President Bashar al-Assad that started 27 months ago. Rebels hope to one day launch an offensive from the area to take the capital, Damascus. The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, which has a network of activists around the country, said Islamic militants led by members of the al-Qaeda affiliate Jabhat al-Nusra, or the Nusra Front, captured the checkpoint after a two-week siege.
NEWS
February 25, 2013 | By Richard Leiby and Sayed Salahuddin, Washington Post
KABUL, Afghanistan - President Hamid Karzai on Sunday ordered all U.S. Special Operations forces to leave a strategically important province in two weeks, alleging that they have been involved in the torture and murder of "innocent people. " A presidential office statement that followed a meeting of Afghanistan's National Security Council also demanded an immediate halt to special-forces activity in Wardak province west of Kabul, a hub of counterinsurgency operations. The action comes after Karzai last week banned his forces from calling in NATO air strikes in populated areas, citing civilian casualties.
NEWS
February 17, 2013 | By Richard Leiby, Washington Post
KABUL, Afghanistan - President Hamid Karzai announced Saturday that he intends to ban Afghan ground forces from calling in NATO air strikes on residential areas - even though his country's fighters have had to rely on such air power in operations against the Taliban. "Our forces ask for air support from foreigners, and children get killed in an air strike," Karzai said in a speech at a military academy here, reinforcing his often truculent posture toward the U.S.-backed international coalition that has long supported his government.
NEWS
December 27, 2012 | By Adam Schreck and Qassim Abdul-Zahra, Associated Press
RAMADI, Iraq - Large, noisy demonstrations against Iraq's government flared for the third time in less than a week Wednesday in Iraq's western Anbar province, raising the prospect of a fresh bout of unrest in a onetime al-Qaeda stronghold on Syria's doorstep. The rallies find echoes in the Arab Spring. Protesters chanted "the people want the downfall of the regime," a slogan that has rippled across the region and was fulfilled in Tunisia and Egypt. Other rallying cries blasted Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki's government as illegitimate and warned that protesters "will cut off any hand that touches us. " While the demonstrators' tenacious show of force could signal the start of a more populist Sunni opposition movement, it risks widening the deep and increasingly bitter rifts with the Shiite-led government in Baghdad.
NEWS
December 20, 2012 | By Hamza Hendawi, Associated Press
ASSIUT, Egypt - A campaign of intimidation by Islamists left most Christians in this southern province too afraid to participate in last week's referendum on an Islamist-drafted constitution they deeply oppose, residents say. The disenfranchisement is raising Christians' worries over their future under empowered Muslim conservatives. Nearly a week before the vote, some 50,000 Islamists marched through the provincial capital, Assiut, chanting that Egypt will be "Islamic, Islamic, despite the Christians.
NEWS
November 28, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rev. Joseph A. Duffey, 87, of Villanova, a retired pastor and former Augustinian provincial, died Friday, Nov. 16, of heart failure at Kindred Hospital Philadelphia-Havertown. From 1981 to 1990, Father Duffey headed the Province of St. Thomas of Villanova. The province sponsors Augustinian ministries on the East Coast, including those at Villanova University, Merrimack College, two high schools, and more than 15 parishes. Augustinians who are members of the province work with laymen and lay women to staff inner-city ministries in the United States, and missions in Japan and Peru.
NEWS
June 28, 2012
Italy's lawmakers ease hiring, firing ROME - The Italian parliament Wednesday gave its final approval to a package of labor laws aimed at making it easier for businesses to hire and fire workers, arming Prime Minister Mario Monti with a victory as he arrived in Brussels for a critical summit of European leaders. Monti has been arguing for greater measures to stir growth and burden-sharing in Europe, steps Germany has been unwilling to take because of a lack of proof that the continent's ailing countries are willing to take strong steps to transform their economies.
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