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NEWS
July 29, 1998 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
To no one's surprise, Democratic gubernatorial candidate Ivan Itkin has won the endorsement of the Pennsylvania State Education Association, which represents 140,000 public school teachers and employees. The union backing came Sunday during PSEA's convention, but the Itkin campaign did not announce it until yesterday. Ken Smukler, an Itkin campaign spokesman, said the PSEA endorsement would translate into "dollars, volunteers and enthusiasm. " "They're a politically sophisticated organization," Smukler said.
NEWS
June 11, 2001 | By Larry Lewis, Michelle Jeffery and Benjamin Wallace-Wells INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Three suburban school districts could face expired teachers' contracts before the next academic year begins, while some office workers in a fourth district want to join the Teamsters. Gary D. Smith of the Pennsylvania State Education Association said local unions are negotiating with school boards in Bensalem, in lower Bucks County, and in the Colonial and North Penn School Districts in Montgomery County. Teachers in Bensalem and North Penn have voted to authorize strikes if contracts are not worked out. The Bensalem contract expires July 1. Smith said a state mediator had set July 2 for the next bargaining session.
NEWS
June 22, 2011
AS THE LEGISLATURE focuses on creating a school-voucher law that is - depending on where you sit - either a cure or a Dr. Kevorkian for public education, there's an interesting political backdrop in the picture. Members of Philly's legislative delegation, a group historically Democratic, pro-public schools and generously underwritten by teachers unions, are taking money from both sides of the debate. A review of campaign contributions from last year and so far this year shows pro-voucher interests spending significantly on Philly lawmakers.
NEWS
October 31, 1990 | By Kimberly J. McLarin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania State Education Association - the state's largest teachers' union - has more than 125,000 members, negotiates contracts in 482 of the state's 501 public school districts, and is part of the National Education Association, one of the nation's most powerful unions. What more could it want? Try Neshaminy. With 9,000 students and nearly 600 teachers, the Neshaminy School District in Bucks County is the largest of the three public school systems in the suburbs in which teachers are represented by the Pennsylvania Federation of Teachers.
NEWS
August 14, 1986 | By Dan Meyers, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
The 120,000-member Pennsylvania State Education Association is expected to announce today its endorsement of Democrat Bob Edgar for senator and Republican William W. Scranton 3d for governor in the November election. Edgar, a U.S. representative from Delaware County, and Scranton, the lieutenant governor from Scranton, were notified yesterday that they would receive the sought-after backing of the PSEA, the statewide union of teachers and other school employees. Potentially hurt by the endorsements were those who did not get them: Sen. Arlen Specter, the Republican incumbent trying for a second term, and former Auditor General Robert P. Casey, the Democrat who defeated Edward G. Rendell in the gubernatorial primary.
NEWS
August 28, 1986 | By Sara Solovitch, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nearly 4,000 teachers in 11 suburban Philadelphia school districts are likely to strike by the first day of school next week, according to union negotiators. Although negotiations began in January, 18 local districts - and 101 districts across the state - are still without contracts, negotiators with the Pennsylvania State Education Association said yesterday during a news conference at the Barclay Hotel. As of yesterday, 120 districts represented by the PSEA had settled statewide, including eight in the Philadelphia suburbs.
NEWS
July 5, 2001 | By Benjamin Wallace-Wells INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Almost 300 support workers in the Downingtown Area School District - school secretaries, classroom aides, and clerks - recently became part of a small but possibly telling trend: They quit the Pennsylvania State Education Association and affiliated with the Teamsters. The Downingtown workers are the third group of suburban Philadelphia school-support employees to look to the Teamsters, and the second to actually make the move, in the last six months. Nationally, Teamsters officials say, only six other school locals have switched their allegiance, all of them west of the Mississippi.
NEWS
April 12, 1992 | By Wendy Greenberg, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
The question of when a school strike disrupts education is now before the state Supreme Court, by way of a suit brought six years ago by four North Penn families and appealed by the state teachers' union. Lawyers for the families, school board and teachers' union argued the case Monday. It is not known when the court will rule. The case, stemming from a six-week 1986 North Penn teachers strike, asks the state to revise Act 195, which allows strikes by public employees, including teachers.
NEWS
March 11, 1995 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
One of the harshest critics of public education in Pennsylvania has a new job - spokesman for the state Department of Education. Sean Duffy, president of the Pennsylvania Leadership Council, an anti-tax, pro-business organization, has been hired by Gov. Ridge to be the department's press secretary. A longtime antagonist of the Pennsylvania State Education Association (PSEA), the state's largest state teachers' union, Duffy and his organization are advocates of so-called school choice as a way to shake up public schools.
NEWS
October 20, 1991 | By Wanda Motley, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
The leadership of Pennsylvania's two major teachers' unions could be found last Monday doing what special-interest groups here do most: huddle and strategize about how best to influence legislators and legislation. It is a regular routine for the Pennsylvania State Education Association (PSEA) and the Pennsylvania Federation of Teachers (PFT), two of the most powerful lobbying groups in the capital. But by midweek, when the bill passed the state Senate, 48-0, the usually united front that the two unions have presented on many educational issues before the legislature fractured over the most critical one: proposed revision of Act 195, which in 1970 gave teachers and other public employees the right to strike.
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NEWS
November 14, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chester and Delaware County teachers and support staff working without contracts rallied Thursday to draw attention to what they say are stalled negotiations. "It's not that they're just unsettled," said Zeek Weil, southeastern representative for the Pennsylvania State Education Association (PSEA). "School boards cancel meetings, reject proposed dates that we offer, come unprepared, hold 30-minute bargaining sessions, and then just want to go home. So it's very frustrating to our members.
NEWS
September 20, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
During most of her 25 years as a public schoolteacher, Jane Ladley did not have much use for the teachers' union, and now that she's retired, she's taking things one giant step further: She's suing it. On Thursday, the 61-year-old former Avon Grove district teacher and another teacher from Lancaster County filed a lawsuit against the state's largest teachers' union, the Pennsylvania State Education Association, over the handling of money they were...
NEWS
June 22, 2011
AS THE LEGISLATURE focuses on creating a school-voucher law that is - depending on where you sit - either a cure or a Dr. Kevorkian for public education, there's an interesting political backdrop in the picture. Members of Philly's legislative delegation, a group historically Democratic, pro-public schools and generously underwritten by teachers unions, are taking money from both sides of the debate. A review of campaign contributions from last year and so far this year shows pro-voucher interests spending significantly on Philly lawmakers.
NEWS
June 6, 2011 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania's largest teachers union has issued its strongest endorsement to date for using student test scores in evaluating teachers, and proposed a streamlined dismissal process for educators and principals. The positions, outlined by James P. Testerman, president of the Pennsylvania State Education Association, are part of the union's "Solutions That Work" proposal, unveiled Monday. It also includes pitches for longtime union goals such as a focus on struggling schools, more parental involvement, and enhanced school safety.
NEWS
June 9, 2010 | By Dan Hardy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Elizabeth Collins has blogged for more than two years about her personal life and experiences as a teacher. One Saturday in February, she posted her thoughts about a student's presentation in her English class at the Academy of Notre Dame de Namur, an all-girls private school in Villanova. She criticized its tone and political outlook. The student's parents took quick exception to that post, telling the school that even though the blog did not identify their daughter by name, it was aimed at her and was an "attack on a child.
NEWS
August 13, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ava Kinney Griffiths, 53, of Collegeville, a former special-education teacher and union negotiator, died of heart and lung disease Monday at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Mrs. Griffiths had received radiation and chemotherapy while in college, her husband, Robert, said, "and at the time they gave her only two years to live. " The effects of the cancer treatment, he said, "caused her problems throughout her life. " In her 40s, her husband said, she had both shoulders replaced.
NEWS
June 18, 2009 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One of Pennsylvania's 11 cyber charter schools has become unionized, possibly the first of its type in the country to vote for representation. During balloting Monday, teachers, counselors, and other professional staff at PA Learners Online Regional Charter School in Allegheny County voted, 42-14, in favor of being represented by an affiliate of the Pennsylvania State Education Association. The Pennsylvania Labor Relations Board oversaw the election. The National Education Association told PSEA officials that PA Learners was the first publicly funded charter school to unionize.
NEWS
September 30, 2003 | By James R. Weaver
Norman F. Ness' Sept. 15 diatribe, "Pa. teachers are too privileged," contained a number of inaccurate statements, but none more so than his claim that the Pennsylvania General Assembly has granted "special standing" to the Pennsylvania State Education Association. To the contrary, the PSEA and the Pennsylvania Federation of Teachers do not have any special status among labor unions representing workers in the public sector, nor do we have any "unfair advantage" over school boards.
NEWS
July 5, 2001 | By Benjamin Wallace-Wells INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Almost 300 support workers in the Downingtown Area School District - school secretaries, classroom aides, and clerks - recently became part of a small but possibly telling trend: They quit the Pennsylvania State Education Association and affiliated with the Teamsters. The Downingtown workers are the third group of suburban Philadelphia school-support employees to look to the Teamsters, and the second to actually make the move, in the last six months. Nationally, Teamsters officials say, only six other school locals have switched their allegiance, all of them west of the Mississippi.
NEWS
June 11, 2001 | By Larry Lewis, Michelle Jeffery and Benjamin Wallace-Wells INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Three suburban school districts could face expired teachers' contracts before the next academic year begins, while some office workers in a fourth district want to join the Teamsters. Gary D. Smith of the Pennsylvania State Education Association said local unions are negotiating with school boards in Bensalem, in lower Bucks County, and in the Colonial and North Penn School Districts in Montgomery County. Teachers in Bensalem and North Penn have voted to authorize strikes if contracts are not worked out. The Bensalem contract expires July 1. Smith said a state mediator had set July 2 for the next bargaining session.
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