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Psychiatry

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NEWS
June 18, 1992 | By Judy Baehr, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Vincent P. Mahoney, 77, whose career in psychiatry and psychoanalysis in South Jersey spanned 40 years, died Monday at the Leader Nursing and Convalescent Center in Cherry Hill. He lived in Haddonfield. A friend and colleague, Edward Zehler, said Dr. Mahoney's "high level of energy, common sense and enthusiasm . . . has resulted in the progress of mental health and psychiatry in South Jersey over the past four decades. " After his medical training at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Dr. Mahoney was an Army medical officer in North Africa and Italy, leaving the service with the rank of colonel.
NEWS
June 20, 1995 | By Barbara J. Richberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
George H. Guest, 82, of Stone Harbor, a neuropsychiatrist and a longtime professor at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, died Saturday at Burdette Tomlin Memorial Hospital in Cape May Court House, N.J. Dr. Guest served on the teaching staff at the college for 43 years. He had been chairman of the department of neurology and psychiatry. Later, when the department was divided, he became chairman of the department of psychiatry. He was one of the organizers of the hospital's neuro-sensory unit and served as director of its diagnostic center.
NEWS
May 15, 1993 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William L. Dyson, 77, a successful surgeon who took up psychiatry when he was 50 and was one of the first doctors to use lithium to treat manic- depressive illness, died Wednesday at his home overlooking the second fairway at Pine Valley (N.J.) Golf Club. "He was one of the first people in Philadelphia to use (lithium)," said his wife, Susan Wise Dyson. She said he had read about its accidental discovery by an Australian doctor and began to use it at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine about 1966.
BUSINESS
December 24, 1990 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wills Eye Hospital, which for 159 years has traded on its reputation for sophisticated eye care, is adding a new service: psychiatry. The hospital, at Ninth and Walnut Streets, is joining with a longtime affiliate, Thomas Jefferson University, to open a 30-bed unit for treating elderly patients with psychiatric problems. Wills personnel will operate the unit and provide nurses and other support personnel. Jefferson doctors will direct the professional services. The development is not quite as unusual as it seems, says the specialty hospital's executive director, D. McWilliams Kessler.
NEWS
October 6, 2002 | By Kristin Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dr. Martin P. Szuba, 44, an associate professor of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and an expert in the treatment of sleep disorders and depression, died of pancreatic cancer Thursday at his home in Haddonfield. During the last several months of his life, Dr. Szuba rushed to fit everything in: He worked on books, papers and research from his hospital bed. He traveled to his favorite vacation spot on Lake Michigan to spend time with his wife and sons.
NEWS
December 29, 1994 | By Barbara J. Richberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Myer Mendelson, 74, a psychiatrist respected for his study of depression and a former professor of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania's School of Medicine, died Sunday at his home in Wynnewood. Dr. Mendelson, a clinician and a consultant, was a prolific author whose publications on depression spanned 40 years. Colleagues said he made major contributions to the understanding and treatment of depression. Albert Stunkard, emeritus chairman of the department of psychiatry at Penn's medical school, said Dr. Mendelson's volume Psychoanalytic Concepts of Depression is widely viewed as the definitive study on depression.
NEWS
July 12, 2011 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A University of Pennsylvania psychiatry professor has filed a complaint with the federal Office of Research Integrity charging that two of his colleagues engaged in research misconduct by allowing their names to be placed on a study published 10 years ago that was ghostwritten by a "medical communications company. " The study, which was funded by what is now GlaxoSmithKline and the National Institutes of Health, looked at the impact of GSK's antidepressant drug Paxil on depression in patients with bipolar disorder.
NEWS
April 28, 1990 | By Bonnie Baker, Special to The Inquirer
Edward Yaskin, 80, a neurologist and doctor of psychiatry, and former longtime psychiatric director of the Camden County Psychiatric Hospital, died yesterday at his home in Haddonfield. Dr. Yaskin was appointed to the Camden County Psychiatric Hospital in 1941. He served there for longer than any other physician in the hospital's history. His proudest accomplishments as director of the hospital were the accreditation of the hospital and the establishment of its Day Treatment Center.
NEWS
January 13, 1998 | By Crispin Sartwell
With some trivial exceptions, I do not believe in blowing people up. But on other grounds I admire Theodore Kaczynski. We're both professor types and hermits by temperament, though he takes it a bit farther into Montana than I do. Our idea of a good time is resorting to the middle of nowhere and writing antitechnological screeds. He allegedly builds bombs, however, and I want to emphasize that I do not. I could never hope to match his craftsmanship. Kaczynski is also, supposedly, a paranoid schizophrenic incapable of forming intentions or distinguishing between good and evil.
NEWS
November 29, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The nationally prominent head of Harvard Medical School's psychiatric hospital has resigned amid charges that he plagiarized material in some articles he wrote, officials announced yesterday. Dr. Shervert Frazier, a former director of the National Institute of Mental Health, resigned as professor of psychiatry and general director/psychiatrist- in-chief at McLean Hospital, a mental hospital affiliated with the medical school. The school's dean, Dr. Daniel Tosteson, said in a letter to faculty that the resignation was accepted "with deep regret.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 10, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
DR. PAUL J. FINK admitted to feeling a bit uneasy. There he was with 100 community leaders at an anti-crime summit in Graterford prison, sitting across from 100 inmates who were unlikely ever again to see the light of freedom. To get to the chapel, where the meeting was held, Fink and his group had to follow guards through the many clanging gates and locks that served as a stark reminder of what it must be like to be shut away for life. But to Dr. Fink's relief and satisfaction, the inmates were just as eager as the community leaders to find answers to what was happening to young people outside in the violent streets.
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Robert Whitaker's book, which questioned the extensive and long-term use of medications in psychiatry, was published in 2010, doctors treated him like a "heretic," he said. So it has been something of a vindication that people like William Dubin, chair of psychiatry at the Temple University School of Medicine, have started inviting him to speak to their peers and students. "It can, of course, be tense. It can be difficult," he said. "On the other hand, increasingly, the receptions have been more open-minded, and I think, actually, psychiatry is trying to rethink their use of medications.
NEWS
May 31, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
PATRICK J. McDonough had a long, serious, creative career as a psychiatrist and mental-hospital administrator, but he could also do a mean imitation of Jerry Lewis. He came home from a college break one day and entertained his family with an exuberant rendition of the comedian belting out "Singin' in the Rain. " In other words, for all the seriousness of his profession, Patrick McDonough had a lighter side. "A wicked sense of humor," as his family put it, and a passion for the fun aspects of local sports that included residence in the rowdy 700 level of old Veterans Stadium and tailgating with a flair.
NEWS
April 26, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Herman S. Belmont, 93, a Philadelphia psychiatrist in the forefront of child mental-health advocacy, died Saturday, April 20, of heart failure at the Quadrangle in Haverford. Before moving to the Quadrangle in 2003, he lived with his family in Elkins Park. During a 45-year career, Dr. Belmont worked on behalf of children here and across the country, his family said. He developed ways of designing services and providing treatment to youngsters outside a hospital setting. From those efforts emerged some of Philadelphia's first community mental-health programs for children and youth.
NEWS
January 12, 2013 | By Kathleen Tinney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Every year, 1.7 million Americans suffer traumatic brain injuries, the result of car accidents, sports, gunshots, and mishaps as seemingly minor as a slip and fall. The rehabilitative path on which many embark was paved in part by Dr. Irwin W. Pollack. A professor of psychiatry and neurology at New Jersey's Robert Wood Johnson Medical School from 1968 to 1998, Dr. Pollack was among the pioneers of an integrated therapy now standard in the field. Where disabilities once were treated piecemeal, he marshaled myriad specialties in a team effort to give head-injury patients if not their old lives back, then new lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2012 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Over her life, June Sams has been told she has schizophrenia and four mental health disorders: bipolar, post-traumatic stress, major depressive, and personality. The 60-year-old Chester woman's current diagnoses - she thinks these fit - are major depressive and generalized anxiety disorders plus PTSD due to childhood trauma. A doctor told Elisa-Beth Gardner, 51, of Swarthmore, that she had borderline personality disorder (BPD) in 1996. Three months later, she was told she had bipolar disorder.
NEWS
May 5, 2012 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
When upward of 10,000 members of the American Psychiatric Association meet here this weekend, they'll be met by protesters - there are always protesters - and tough questions about where their profession is headed and how it will define normalcy for the rest of us. The official theme of the annual meeting, which opens Saturday at the Pennsylvania Convention Center, is integrated care, a nod to the increasingly interdisciplinary nature of medicine...
NEWS
July 13, 2011 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
A University of Pennsylvania psychiatry professor has filed a complaint with federal officials alleging that two of his colleagues, including the chair of Penn's psychiatry department, engaged in research misconduct by allowing their names to be placed on a study published 10 years ago that was ghostwritten by a "medical communications company. " The study, funded by what is now GlaxoSmithKline and the National Institutes of Health, looked at the impact of Glaxo's antidepressant drug Paxil on depression in patients with bipolar disorder.
NEWS
July 12, 2011 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A University of Pennsylvania psychiatry professor has filed a complaint with the federal Office of Research Integrity charging that two of his colleagues engaged in research misconduct by allowing their names to be placed on a study published 10 years ago that was ghostwritten by a "medical communications company. " The study, which was funded by what is now GlaxoSmithKline and the National Institutes of Health, looked at the impact of GSK's antidepressant drug Paxil on depression in patients with bipolar disorder.
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