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Psychic Powers

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 1987 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
So you say you have psychic powers, do you? Well, here's how to make a quick $10,000. All you have to do is go down to the Franklin Institute tomorrow, Sunday or Monday and demonstrate them to James Randi, magician- lecturer who is appearing during the museum's special weekend, "Science Fact and Science Fiction. " Randi's lecture-demonstrations, scheduled in the Science Auditorium at 12:30, 2 and 3 p.m. tomorrow through Monday, are titled "The Truth Behind the Tricks. " In them, Randi - also known as the Amazing Randi, also known as Psychic Enemy No. 1 - will show how self-styled psychic Uri Geller really bends spoons on television (it's not with brain waves)
NEWS
March 27, 1986 | By Fredric N. Tulsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
Common Pleas Judge Court Leon Katz ruled yesterday that a woman had failed to prove that she was unable to use psychic powers she said she possessed because of a reaction she suffered to medical tests performed 10 years ago. Katz ruled that the jury could not award Judith Richardson Haimes damages from Temple University Hospital and a staff physician, based on the loss of her business as a professional psychic. Katz ruled shortly after Haimes had rested her case that she "has failed to produce any expert testimony that her headaches and subsequent inability to practice her occupation as a psychic were caused by the defendants' conduct.
NEWS
January 9, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Vivien Parnell McCarthy, 69, a legal secretary who ran a psychic entertainment business from her home in Mount Airy, died Wednesday, Dec. 30, of ovarian cancer at home. Although she worked as a paralegal and secretary, Mrs. McCarthy was best known as Vivienne McCarthy, psychic, fortune teller, palmist, numerologist, and astrologist. Mrs. McCarthy used everything from playing cards to kangaroo bones, tea leaves to candle flames, and sand to stones in predicting the future, she told Philadelphia Daily News reporter Joe Clark.
NEWS
April 11, 1986
Instead of a ridiculous liability judgment against Temple University Hospital, the hospital can offer to pass the psychic back through the CAT scanner in the reverse direction (free of charge) to restore her "psychic powers. " G.S. Weber Woodbury, N.J.
NEWS
August 8, 1986 | By Rich Heidorn Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
Common Pleas Court Judge Leon Katz yesterday threw out a $986,000 jury award to a woman who contended that she lost her psychic powers after a CAT scan, saying the verdict was "grossly excessive" and not based on the evidence. Acting on a motion by attorneys for Temple University Hospital, Katz ordered a new trial in the lawsuit by Judith Richardson Haimes. The verdict, which received national attention when it was announced in March, was "so grossly excessive as to shock the court's sense of justice," Katz wrote in an opinion.
NEWS
March 28, 1986 | By TONI LOCY, Daily News Staff Writer
Judith Richardson Haimes, who claimed a CAT scan she received at Temple University Hospital robbed her of her psychic powers, may recover more than $1 million as a result of a Common Pleas jury verdict. The eight-member jury deliberated about 45 minutes yesterday before deciding that Haimes should receive $600,000. Judge Leon Katz said state law also provides for delay damages. According to the law, the winning party is entitled to 10 percent of the award per year since the suit was filed, Katz said.
NEWS
October 6, 1992 | by Ed Voves, Special to the Daily News
"ENGLISH MUSIC" By Peter Ackroyd Knopf / $23 Peter Ackroyd's "English Music" is a tale of a young boy's awakening sense of identity. It is far from being a conventional "coming of age" novel, however. Coming of the "ages" would be more accurate. For Timothy Harcombe, the book's protagonist, is no ordinary child. Set in England during the 1920s and '30s, the novel depicts Timothy's relationship with his father, Clement. A psychic healer, the elder Harcombe possesses astonishing power to cure the troubled and the infirm.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2013
ARIES (March 21-April 19) When someone you were thinking about calls you, it's an affirmation of your psychic powers. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Instead of talking with a few people in depth, connect briefly with many. There is something valuable to be gained from skimming the surface of the social scene. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) Your retrograde guiding planet may lead you back to the scene of a mistake, giving you the rare do-over opportunity. CANCER (June 22-July 22) You're not trying to win someone over.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 9, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Vivien Parnell McCarthy, 69, a legal secretary who ran a psychic entertainment business from her home in Mount Airy, died Wednesday, Dec. 30, of ovarian cancer at home. Although she worked as a paralegal and secretary, Mrs. McCarthy was best known as Vivienne McCarthy, psychic, fortune teller, palmist, numerologist, and astrologist. Mrs. McCarthy used everything from playing cards to kangaroo bones, tea leaves to candle flames, and sand to stones in predicting the future, she told Philadelphia Daily News reporter Joe Clark.
NEWS
February 14, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Barbara Kellam crosses through a field of knee-high weeds and towering power lines in Sicklerville, still wearing the pink scrubs from her overnight shift as a nurse as she searches for sand and water. She calls a psychic, a Haitian priest, and puts him on speaker phone. Kellam didn't believe much in psychic powers until her cousin Erica Crosby, a mother of two, disappeared on New Year's Eve, the black dress she had bought online and was supposed to wear never removed from the box. Now - with Crosby's husband, Kyle, accused of killing her, but authorities unable to find the Mount Laurel woman's body - Kellam will take any clues she can find.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2013
ARIES (March 21-April 19) When someone you were thinking about calls you, it's an affirmation of your psychic powers. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Instead of talking with a few people in depth, connect briefly with many. There is something valuable to be gained from skimming the surface of the social scene. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) Your retrograde guiding planet may lead you back to the scene of a mistake, giving you the rare do-over opportunity. CANCER (June 22-July 22) You're not trying to win someone over.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2010 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
The opening-titles sequence of Dinner for Schmucks offers a series of curious tableaux: meticulously constructed dioramas of two taxidermized mice, dressed up like people, in various stages of courtship. A human hand can be seen in several of the shots, delicately applying paint, or fixing an article of clothing on the cute, but decidedly dead, rodents. Whoever that hand belongs to has got to be weird. And indeed, as we soon learn, he is. Barry - played by Steve Carell with a nerdy overbite and, well, a mousy mien - is an IRS employee who builds elaborate miniature scenes in his spare time.
NEWS
August 21, 1994 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On a chilly day in November 1991, a grass fire burning near his rural Cape May County, N.J., home caught the attention of a red-haired, freckle-faced boy of 12. The boy, Mark Himebaugh, left a park where he was playing to watch the commotion and was never seen again. Investigators, from the local police to the FBI, descended on the small town of Del Haven. Hundreds of volunteers poked through underbrush and water pipes. Police searched with helicopters and bloodhounds. On radio and television, the boy's father, Jody Himebaugh, appealed for help.
NEWS
October 6, 1992 | by Ed Voves, Special to the Daily News
"ENGLISH MUSIC" By Peter Ackroyd Knopf / $23 Peter Ackroyd's "English Music" is a tale of a young boy's awakening sense of identity. It is far from being a conventional "coming of age" novel, however. Coming of the "ages" would be more accurate. For Timothy Harcombe, the book's protagonist, is no ordinary child. Set in England during the 1920s and '30s, the novel depicts Timothy's relationship with his father, Clement. A psychic healer, the elder Harcombe possesses astonishing power to cure the troubled and the infirm.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 1987 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
So you say you have psychic powers, do you? Well, here's how to make a quick $10,000. All you have to do is go down to the Franklin Institute tomorrow, Sunday or Monday and demonstrate them to James Randi, magician- lecturer who is appearing during the museum's special weekend, "Science Fact and Science Fiction. " Randi's lecture-demonstrations, scheduled in the Science Auditorium at 12:30, 2 and 3 p.m. tomorrow through Monday, are titled "The Truth Behind the Tricks. " In them, Randi - also known as the Amazing Randi, also known as Psychic Enemy No. 1 - will show how self-styled psychic Uri Geller really bends spoons on television (it's not with brain waves)
NEWS
September 8, 1986
I would like to commend Judge Leon Katz for rejecting the ridiculous damage award to Judith Haimes, who said that a CAT scan impaired her psychic powers. I certainly wonder by what criteria the jurors reached their decision. Where is their reasoning or common sense? One can lose psychic ability at any time. Surely, if Ms. Haines was psychic at the time she would have sensed a problem with the test. I applaud Judge Katz for his wise decision and integrity. Kathleen Gillespie Croydon.
NEWS
August 8, 1986 | By Rich Heidorn Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
Common Pleas Court Judge Leon Katz yesterday threw out a $986,000 jury award to a woman who contended that she lost her psychic powers after a CAT scan, saying the verdict was "grossly excessive" and not based on the evidence. Acting on a motion by attorneys for Temple University Hospital, Katz ordered a new trial in the lawsuit by Judith Richardson Haimes. The verdict, which received national attention when it was announced in March, was "so grossly excessive as to shock the court's sense of justice," Katz wrote in an opinion.
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