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Psycho

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1991 | By Richard Fuller, Special to The Inquirer
"Endless TV showings, imitations and parodies have dulled the cutting edge of Psycho," writes Stephen Rebello, "particularly to a generation that may mistake spurting blood bags, flash editing and cranked-up soundtracks for the real thrills. " My guess is that Rebello does not teach film in general and Alfred Hitchcock in particular to the "generation" in question. I do. And my students are all collectively crazy about Hitch in general and Psycho in particular. Enrollment for classes about this filmmaker are more than double the number for any other director.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2009 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Esther is a godsend. So it seems to her new parents, John Coleman (Peter Sarsgaard) and his wife, Kate (Vera Farmiga), at the start of Jaume Collet-Serra's immaculately plotted and photographed chiller, Orphan , one of the best entries in the cute-as-a-button-psycho-demon-child-from-hell subgenre. A beautiful 9-year-old Russian-born orphan, Esther is the perfect cure for the traumatized couple, whose marriage has taken a few body blows, including the death of their unborn child.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1990 | By Hans Kellner, Special to The Inquirer
"You want to do what?" The Paramount executives were beside themselves. Here was Alfred Hitchcock, the master of suspense, the biggest director in Hollywood, saying he wanted to make a movie about some loon who puts on his mother's dress and slices people up in the shower. What next, a mummy in the basement? Hitchcock called Psycho his "30-day picture," a quick change of pace from the long train of colorful thrillers he had directed for Paramount in the 1950s. Tired of what he termed "glossy Technicolor baubles," Hitchcock saw in Robert Bloch's 1959 novel the perfect brew of sex, voyeurism and bloody murder to shake his audience up. But the jittery execs were having none of it. Wary of the tale's transvestism and bloodletting, Paramount pronounced it an "impossible project," pulled its financing and forced the determined director to bankroll the movie himself.
LIVING
October 25, 1997 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This article contains material from the Associated Press and the Los Angeles Times
The shower curtain parts. The knife descends. The blood swirls down the drain. That scary scene in Psycho left Alfred Hitchcock's leading lady, Janet Leigh, a bath enthusiast for life. "I suddenly said to myself, 'My God, we're so vulnerable and defenseless in the shower,' " the 70-year-old actress said. "You can't hear because the water's running. You can't see. You're there and you're easy picking. " Leigh, in Glenside for a screening at the Keswick Theatre the other night of Psycho, hasn't taken a shower since madman Norman Bates (Anthony Perkins)
NEWS
November 30, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
WHEN SACHA GERVASI premiered his new feature "Hitchcock" at the American Film Institute last month (see review on Page 36), it was strange sort of homecoming. "Hitchcock, famously, never won an Oscar, though he was nominated several times. But in 1979, the American Film Institute gave him its lifetime-achievment award, and everybody was there - Jimmy Stewart and Cary Grant, all of his stars and friends, and it was a huge evening for him," Gervasi said. "And he said 'I share this award, as I have my life, with [wife]
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2002 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
It's probably inevitable that the film adaptation of the novel introducing the insatiable Hannibal Lecter would cannibalize its source material. But who would have predicted that Red Dragon, on one hand the prequel to the blockbusters Silence of the Lambs and Hannibal, and on the other a remake of Michael Mann's creepily effective 1986 thriller Manhunter, would swallow without chewing? For the most part, Dragon is excellently cast (Anthony Hopkins reprises his role as Lecter, Ed Norton is FBI profiler Will Graham)
NEWS
April 10, 1998 | By David Boldt
The story starts in the middle of the night in March 1983, when Keith Scott, an 18-year-old ex-cook riding in the back seat of his ex-employer's Lincoln Continental, placed a knife at the throat of a passenger in the front seat - and then sliced the man's neck open. He ultimately stabbed him 17 times, and then cut the ex-employer, who was driving, 15 times - with one of the cuts nearly beheading the man. Maybe it was the 20 pain pills Scott reportedly said he had been downing with vodka and beer.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1993 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Toss a stone in any direction from the intersection of 20th and Snyder and, chances are, it will land near a onetime residence of screenwriter Joe Stefano, whose "veiled autobiography" Two Bits begins shooting in South Philly tomorrow. A drive with Stefano down the neighborhood's tidy rowhouse blocks is an invitation to whiplash. "I lived there," says the trim 71-year-old with the toothbrush mustache, pointing at a stone structure on the tree-lined 2200 stretch of South Lambert, where he learned to roller-skate while gripping onto the low hedges that flanked the rowhouse stoops.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2000 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
It lasts only 45 seconds, but it took a week to film because it was composed of 78 separate shots. But after Alfred Hitchcock completed the shower scene in Psycho, the way movies treated murder and madness changed forever. The star of that scene, Janet Leigh, is scheduled to introduce a free screening of the film at the Bala Theatre on Thursday. Hitchcock said of his macabre masterwork - a piece that has exerted an incalculable influence on succeeding generations of directors - that the creation of Psycho made him feel like a man leading fair-goers through a haunted house.
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NEWS
December 18, 2014 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
THEY SAY a protection-from-abuse order is just a piece of a paper. For Valerie Morrow, it might as well have been her death certificate. Hours after the 40-year-old mother had obtained the order on Monday, the man she'd feared the most - Stephen Rozniakowski, an enraged Delaware County cop with a history of harassment - grabbed a gun, strapped on a bulletproof vest, kicked down the door to her Glenolden home, ran up the stairs and shot her, authorities...
SPORTS
November 4, 2014 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
DAVID WELLS has no problem telling it like it is. Or was. The former major league pitcher talked candidly about his dislike for late Reds owner Marge Schott in a taped appearance on YES Network's "CenterStage" last night. Wells spent only a half-season with the Reds in 1995, but dealing with Schott made it seem like an eternity. "[She] was psycho," Wells said of Schott. "She's nuts - cheap as can be. You had to go in, if you wanted a pair of socks or sleeves or stirrups, whatever it was, you had to go up in her office, and it was like a cave in there . . . you had to buy them from her. She taxed our meal money.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2013 | By Rick Bentley, THE FRESNO BEE
This week's new DVD releases take you to worlds of fantasy, filmmaking, and furry heroes. Cirque du Soleil: Worlds Away, Grade B : A young woman is pulled into a magical world of acrobats and artists. The film uses a rather standard boy-meets-girl plot to take the audience on a fanciful journey to a land of acrobats and artists who look at gravity as more of a suggestion than a law. Cirque du Soleil: Worlds Away should be appreciated like an abstract painting. It's beautiful to look at, but it isn't fully appreciated until you add in your own ideas about what all of the images are trying to say. There are positive and negatives of bringing the stage performance to DVD. It opens up the stage show to an audience who may have never had the opportunity, or the finances, to see one of the live shows.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2013 | BY ELLEN GRAY, Daily News Television Critic graye@phillynews.com, 215-854-5950
* BATES MOTEL. 10 p.m. Monday, A&E.   "WE OWN a motel, Norman Bates!" crows Norma Bates (Vera Farmiga) in Monday's premiere of A&E's "Bates Motel. " What could possibly go wrong? I spent decades avoiding "Psycho" - so that I could continue to take showers - and even I knew the answer to that one. I finally broke down last weekend and borrowed the 1960 classic from my amused, Hitchcock-loving son, who's never quite understood why "The Birds" traumatized me as a child.
NEWS
November 30, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
IT'S OSCAR SEASON - time for another homage to the wonder of movies and the people who make them, people who also, coincidentally, vote for Oscars. This year's model is "Hitchcock," an offbeat romcom featuring Anthony Hopkins as the great director, who's working on his game-changing independent feature "Psycho" while trying to maintain a happy marriage to screenwriter wife Alma (Helen Mirren). The movie has offended film historians, who note that its account of the making of "Psycho" is greatly fabricated.
NEWS
November 30, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
WHEN SACHA GERVASI premiered his new feature "Hitchcock" at the American Film Institute last month (see review on Page 36), it was strange sort of homecoming. "Hitchcock, famously, never won an Oscar, though he was nominated several times. But in 1979, the American Film Institute gave him its lifetime-achievment award, and everybody was there - Jimmy Stewart and Cary Grant, all of his stars and friends, and it was a huge evening for him," Gervasi said. "And he said 'I share this award, as I have my life, with [wife]
NEWS
November 25, 2012 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Remember last Christmas Day? The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo , the David Fincher thriller that pivoted on acts of rape, murder, abduction, and torture, opened in theaters across the land - a heartwarming yuletide treat if ever there was one. This Noel? How about an ultraviolent Quentin Tarantino flick in which a brutalized slave goes searching for a band of psycho bounty hunters? Although there is some family-friendly fare making its way to the multiplexes between now and New Year's - the 3-D animated Dino Time , a 3-D-ized re-release of Pixar's Monsters, Inc. , and Cirque du Soleil: Worlds Away - this holiday season looks to be pretty dark, bloody, brutal, provocative, and profane.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2012 | By CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer
THE LAST time I found myself in a dressing room makeup chair was at Atlantic City's Boardwalk Hall in January 2010. That day, I was being transformed into a woman (cosmetically, that is) for a story headlined "Queen For A Day. " But on a recent early-fall Friday afternoon, the location was Six Flags Great Adventure in Jackson Township, N.J., and the assignment was infinitely more fun: Spend an hour or so as a "psycho clown" at Fright Fest, the popular theme park's annual, October-long Halloween event.
NEWS
May 29, 2011
What You See in the Dark By Manuel Muñoz Algonquin Books. 272 pp. $23.95. Reviewed by John Shortino   Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho is a famously unsettling film: The sudden act of violence in the first act disorients the audience, adding an undercurrent of menace to every scene that follows. Manuel Muñoz's first novel, What You See in the Dark , takes a cue from Hitchcock's film, with a dark twist early in the book that adds a layer of dread and impending violence to the stories of four women in the town of Bakersfield, Calif., where scenes from Psycho are being filmed.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2009 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Esther is a godsend. So it seems to her new parents, John Coleman (Peter Sarsgaard) and his wife, Kate (Vera Farmiga), at the start of Jaume Collet-Serra's immaculately plotted and photographed chiller, Orphan, one of the best entries in the cute-as-a-button-psycho-demon-child-from-hell subgenre. A beautiful 9-year-old Russian-born orphan, Esther is the perfect cure for the traumatized couple, whose marriage has taken a few body blows, including the death of their unborn child.
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