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Psychoanalysis

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NEWS
December 22, 2003 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Richard Rosenfeld, an art dealer in Old City, has used his study of psychoanalysis to open a new personal window on art appreciation. Years ago, when he first saw a painting like Earth, Seed of Air - an abstract study of texture and shape in earth tones that glows like embers on the left and rests coolly like volcanic ash on the right - Rosenfeld would have focused first on the artist's technique. He would have noticed the way Tremain Smith laid a grid and circles on top of wild smears and washes of color, the way she used texture to suggest perspective, the way the darks and lights played against one another.
NEWS
March 24, 1990 | By Fen Montaigne, Inquirer Staff Writer
Forty Soviet psychiatrists lean forward in their chairs, tape recorders running, pens poised, brows knit with doctorly concern. They await the words of the psychoanalyst from Philadelphia, Dr. William O'Brien. O'Brien has just spent 45 minutes gently coaxing answers from 17-year-old Alex, a rosy-cheeked, bespectacled Soviet who sat rigidly before the group vigorously kneading his hands. It seems that every time Alex sits down with a textbook he is overcome by visions of "hooligans" pounding him to a pulp.
NEWS
April 7, 1994 | BY MSGR. S.J. ADAMO
Few writers have had more influence on modern man than Sigmund Freud, the inventor of psychoanalysis. He has enriched the vocabulary with such concepts as the unconscious, the subconscious, sublimation and transference. He has made us aware of the murky depths from which our thinking and behavior emerge into consciousness. He has shown us how sexuality pervades so much of our lives. I remember a seminar many years ago in Canon Law when the name Freud popped up. One member ridiculed him, saying, "The trouble with Freud is that he conceived of man as no more than a glorified penis.
NEWS
June 18, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Homer C. Curtis, 96, a retired psychoanalyst and leader in the analytic community, died of coronary artery disease on Tuesday, June 4, at Waverly Heights in Gladwyne. Before moving to the retirement village in 2011, he had lived in Haverford, Lower Merion Township, for almost 60 years. Dr. Curtis practiced in Haverford and Philadelphia, training therapists and psychoanalysts and treating patients until retiring several years ago. "His warmth, empathy, and insightfulness made him a much sought-after analyst, supervisor, and teacher," his family said in a prepared statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2012 | BY HOWARD GENSLER, gensleh@phillynews.com 215-854-5678
IN "A DANGEROUS Method," Keira Knightley turns her fingers into claws and thrusts her jaw into such a canine state you almost expect her to turn into a werewolf. Another CGI-filled horror film? Nope, it's David Cronenberg's fastidious and polite look at Sabina Spielrein (Knightley), Karl Jung (Michael Fassbender), Sigmund Freud (Viggo Mortensen) and the birth of psychoanalysis. The Daily News spoke with Knightley about her preparation for the role in September at the Toronto International Film Festival.
NEWS
April 2, 2001 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two groups of Philadelphia psychoanalysts who split 50 years ago - and have spent much of the time since bickering about such issues as whether a therapist should greet a patient at a party - are getting back together. Not that they're rushing into it. Some members of both groups have been talking for two decades about getting back together. They have been planning and negotiating seriously for three years. They are not quite done, but they do have a name for the unified service and training organization they are about to launch: the Psychoanalytic Center of Philadelphia.
NEWS
August 4, 1997 | By Bernard Friedberg
I have never evaluated or treated a woman who concealed her pregnancy and then killed her infant, but I have been involved in many cases in which young women shared their secrets about what they would do and how they would feel in the event they got pregnant and did not want the child. My findings in these cases are consistent with other experts' opinions. All of my cases imagined the dread of experiencing their parents' disapproval on revealing their pregnancies. "It is the fear of rejection," said Dr. Robert Blum of the University of Minnesota, quoted in a New York Times Magazine article, "of retribution, of falling in the esteem of your parents.
NEWS
January 14, 2000 | By Rusty Pray, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Selma Kramer, 79, a child psychiatrist and former head of the Department of Child Psychiatry at the Medical College of Pennsylvania, died Sunday of breast cancer at her home in East Falls. Dr. Kramer taught from 1965 until 1988 at the Medical College of Pennsylvania, where she served as a professor of child psychiatry and as section head. She was a professor of child psychiatry at Thomas Jefferson University Medical Center from 1988 until about a year ago. A protege of the late Dr. Margaret S. Mahler, a noted New York child psychiatrist and author, Dr. Kramer helped to demonstrate that psychoanalysis, considered a technique that could be applied only to adults, could be used to help children.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2012
"Let me tell you the best part about getting older," 66-year-old screen legend Diane Keaton says. There's a good part? "The best part is that I'm still here and, because the end is in sight, I treasure it all more," Keaton tells AARP The Magazine. "You have to live life that way, you know? Take risks. Do things you can't imagine. 'Cause hey, why not, right?" Keaton has not (yet) resorted to plastic surgery to offset age. "I haven't had it," she says. "But never say never.
NEWS
April 9, 2005
Merchants of death Caring Americans were saddened to learn of the lung cancer diagnosis of longtime ABC news anchor Peter Jennings, and we wish him Godspeed as he undertakes the challenge of his life. Jennings was a 20-year reformed smoker until, regrettably, he yielded to his nicotine addiction after 9/11. Perhaps his misfortune can serve a beneficent purpose by illustrating to all Americans the life-threatening nature of smoking-related illnesses, and the irreversible damage that can be done to one's body, even when one stops smoking for many years.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 18, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Homer C. Curtis, 96, a retired psychoanalyst and leader in the analytic community, died of coronary artery disease on Tuesday, June 4, at Waverly Heights in Gladwyne. Before moving to the retirement village in 2011, he had lived in Haverford, Lower Merion Township, for almost 60 years. Dr. Curtis practiced in Haverford and Philadelphia, training therapists and psychoanalysts and treating patients until retiring several years ago. "His warmth, empathy, and insightfulness made him a much sought-after analyst, supervisor, and teacher," his family said in a prepared statement.
NEWS
November 30, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
WHEN SACHA GERVASI premiered his new feature "Hitchcock" at the American Film Institute last month (see review on Page 36), it was strange sort of homecoming. "Hitchcock, famously, never won an Oscar, though he was nominated several times. But in 1979, the American Film Institute gave him its lifetime-achievment award, and everybody was there - Jimmy Stewart and Cary Grant, all of his stars and friends, and it was a huge evening for him," Gervasi said. "And he said 'I share this award, as I have my life, with [wife]
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2012
"Let me tell you the best part about getting older," 66-year-old screen legend Diane Keaton says. There's a good part? "The best part is that I'm still here and, because the end is in sight, I treasure it all more," Keaton tells AARP The Magazine. "You have to live life that way, you know? Take risks. Do things you can't imagine. 'Cause hey, why not, right?" Keaton has not (yet) resorted to plastic surgery to offset age. "I haven't had it," she says. "But never say never.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2012 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Columnist
How could he choose her? That's been the refrain this week as people question Ben Flajnik's choice of Courtney Robertson as his "forever" on The Bachelor . With two dozen lovely women to pick from, why select a lady so high-maintenance you need a tool chest to take her out for coffee? A personality so volatile that Doppler radar can't keep track of her moods? Call it the Case of the Bachelor's Revenge. (Disclaimer: This is a theory. Cast member's actual motivations may vary.)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2012 | BY HOWARD GENSLER, gensleh@phillynews.com 215-854-5678
IN "A DANGEROUS Method," Keira Knightley turns her fingers into claws and thrusts her jaw into such a canine state you almost expect her to turn into a werewolf. Another CGI-filled horror film? Nope, it's David Cronenberg's fastidious and polite look at Sabina Spielrein (Knightley), Karl Jung (Michael Fassbender), Sigmund Freud (Viggo Mortensen) and the birth of psychoanalysis. The Daily News spoke with Knightley about her preparation for the role in September at the Toronto International Film Festival.
NEWS
April 9, 2005
Merchants of death Caring Americans were saddened to learn of the lung cancer diagnosis of longtime ABC news anchor Peter Jennings, and we wish him Godspeed as he undertakes the challenge of his life. Jennings was a 20-year reformed smoker until, regrettably, he yielded to his nicotine addiction after 9/11. Perhaps his misfortune can serve a beneficent purpose by illustrating to all Americans the life-threatening nature of smoking-related illnesses, and the irreversible damage that can be done to one's body, even when one stops smoking for many years.
NEWS
December 22, 2003 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Richard Rosenfeld, an art dealer in Old City, has used his study of psychoanalysis to open a new personal window on art appreciation. Years ago, when he first saw a painting like Earth, Seed of Air - an abstract study of texture and shape in earth tones that glows like embers on the left and rests coolly like volcanic ash on the right - Rosenfeld would have focused first on the artist's technique. He would have noticed the way Tremain Smith laid a grid and circles on top of wild smears and washes of color, the way she used texture to suggest perspective, the way the darks and lights played against one another.
NEWS
April 2, 2001 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two groups of Philadelphia psychoanalysts who split 50 years ago - and have spent much of the time since bickering about such issues as whether a therapist should greet a patient at a party - are getting back together. Not that they're rushing into it. Some members of both groups have been talking for two decades about getting back together. They have been planning and negotiating seriously for three years. They are not quite done, but they do have a name for the unified service and training organization they are about to launch: the Psychoanalytic Center of Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 2, 2000 | By Melissa Knox
In October 1900, the 44-year-old Viennese psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud began treating a troubled 18-year-old woman for psychosomatic symptoms - migraines, a cough, a limp. Eleven weeks later, she left abruptly. "Her breaking off so unexpectedly, just when my hopes of a successful termination of the treatment were at their highest," Freud wrote, "and her thus bringing those hopes to nothing - this was an unmistakable act of vengeance on her part. " Freud's treatment of Dora opened the era of modern psychoanalysis.
NEWS
January 14, 2000 | By Rusty Pray, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Selma Kramer, 79, a child psychiatrist and former head of the Department of Child Psychiatry at the Medical College of Pennsylvania, died Sunday of breast cancer at her home in East Falls. Dr. Kramer taught from 1965 until 1988 at the Medical College of Pennsylvania, where she served as a professor of child psychiatry and as section head. She was a professor of child psychiatry at Thomas Jefferson University Medical Center from 1988 until about a year ago. A protege of the late Dr. Margaret S. Mahler, a noted New York child psychiatrist and author, Dr. Kramer helped to demonstrate that psychoanalysis, considered a technique that could be applied only to adults, could be used to help children.
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