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Psychologist

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NEWS
September 15, 1994 | By Barbara J. Richberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Wilbur W. Blakely, Ed.D., 66, a psychologist and Presbyterian minister, died Sunday at his home in Warminster. Dr. Blakely was the founding pastor of Calvary Presbyterian Church in Willow Grove. From 1982 to 1992, he was an adjunct associate professor in counseling psychology at Temple University. Born in Castana, Iowa, Dr. Blakely was a graduate of Mapleton High School in Mapleton, Iowa. He received his bachelor's degree in 1949 at Macalester College in St. Paul, Minn.
NEWS
July 12, 1990 | By Karl Stark, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Bucks County Board of Commissioners yesterday renewed the contract of a psychologist whose findings last year of sexual abuse and satanic rituals at a Northampton Township day-care center were discredited by the county District Attorney's Office. Bucks County District Attorney Alan M. Rubenstein said yesterday that the psychologist, John M. Gentry, "has no credibility with me personally. His conclusions are frightening because they implicate innocent people for crimes that were never committed.
NEWS
September 5, 1991 | By Kathi Kauffman, Special to The Inquirer
Andrew J. D'Amico wants to turn peer pressure into peer support. D'Amico, a licensed psychologist and a member of Rosemont Counseling Associates, is forming a discussion group for 10 high school students between the ages of 15 and 18 to provide a place for them to talk openly about problems and concerns. "This is not a therapy group," D'Amico said. "My role is to act as a facilitator, not provide therapy. I will simply ensure that they do not hurt each other. " Although no parents will be allowed to attend the discussion sessions, D'Amico said he would be glad to confer with parents or any other professionals such as teachers or guidance counselors, at any time.
NEWS
April 8, 1987 | By JOHN M. BAER, Daily News Staff Writer
Charges of sexual misconduct against a Philadelphia psychologist have moved the state to order an emergency suspension of his license and to seek its revocation. The state Board of Psychology said in documents released this week that the continued practice of psychologist Richard J. Jacobson, of Panama Street near 24th, presents "a clear danger to the public health and safety. " The action is based on allegations by three former female patients that Jacobson was sexually involved with them in separate instances between 1979 and 1983.
NEWS
April 8, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Albert Levitt, 87, of Flourtown, a retired chief psychologist for the Philadelphia Common Pleas Court, died Thursday, March 26, at home of complications from Parkinson's disease. Born and reared in Logan, Dr. Levitt moved to Flourtown in 1980. He quit high school to join the Army in December 1945 and was honorably discharged in October 1947. When he returned stateside, Dr. Levitt finished high school at Temple High School. He went on to earn undergraduate and master's degrees from Temple University.
NEWS
August 4, 1993 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sylvia Ernst's attorney attempted to tread a fine line yesterday. Ernst, of Chester County, has alleged in a federal suit that Chester County Children and Youth Services (CYS) violated her civil rights by removing her granddaughter from her custody five years ago. Yesterday, her attorney, Robert Gidding, tried to show that Ernst had suffered enough to deserve the unspecified monetary damages she is seeking, yet not so much that it affected her ability to raise the child. A psychologist who both evaluated and treated Ernst in seven sessions over the last few years said that Ernst is suffering from clinical depression and would need counseling once or twice a week for "possibly as long as two years.
NEWS
March 18, 1999 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Alan T. Pollon, 58, a psychologist for Pennsylvania Hospital and a longtime emergency-squad member in Lower Merion and then in Willingboro, died of complications from diabetes Sunday at his Marlton home. Mr. Pollon, a Marlton resident for the last three years, previously lived in Willingboro for more than 25 years. He was a psychologist for Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia for 27 years until becoming ill three years ago. Previously, he worked for the Drenk Guidance Center in Mount Holly.
NEWS
April 15, 1987 | By JOHN M. BAER, Daily News Staff Writer
A 60-year old Philadelphia psychologist charged with taking sexual advantage of three female patients has been ordered to face a formal state hearing to determine whether he should be barred from practice. The state Board of Psychology also reaffirmed its order that the psychologist's license remain in "emergency" suspension, saying his practice presents "a clear danger" to the public. The psychologist, Richard J. Jacobson, of Delancey Place near 24th Street, denied the sexual misconduct charges under oath during a five-hour preliminary hearing yesterday.
NEWS
June 24, 1989 | By Connie O'Kane, Special to The Inquirer
Drugs took Matthew C. Ploppert from his loving, middle-class family and sent him on the way to a life of crime and murder, a defense psychologist testified yesterday. Ploppert's case was "a kind of tragic story of an individual from a strong family background with middle-class values and mores whose addiction to drugs led to a criminal lifestyle," Jonathan P. Vitriol, a psychologist from Bensalem, told the jury in Superior Court Judge Paul R. Kramer's Mount Holly courtroom.
NEWS
March 3, 2001 | By Oshrat Carmiel INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Dr. Earl Donald Longenecker, 76, a clinical psychologist from Yardley, died Wednesday after cardiac complications at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in East Orange, N.J. Dr. Longenecker, known as "Dr. L. " to family and friends, was born in Mount Joy and reared in Salunga, both near Lancaster. He was an Army veteran who fought in World War II, and was paralyzed from the chest down by a gunshot wound to the spinal cord during the Battle of Rhineland. Dr. Longenecker graduated from Stanford University with a degree in psychology in 1951 and earned his master's degree and doctorate in psychology from the University of Texas.
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NEWS
June 5, 2015 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
AS BIOPIC subjects go, Brian Wilson is a doozy. After all, the story arc of his almost 73 years seems far more the stuff of fiction than fact. Physically and emotionally abused as a child (he claims he lost 96 percent of the hearing in his right ear to the corporal punishment administered by his father, Murray), he nonetheless went on to found the Beach Boys and serve as the iconic band's original bassist and chief composer, conjuring such pop-rock totems as "Wouldn't It Be Nice," "God Only Knows," "California Girls" and "Good Vibrations.
NEWS
May 4, 2015
YOU KNOW this guy. You might not know his name, or exactly why he always seems to be around the local pro teams, but you know the face: those kind, sad eyes that ooze empathy, that wide, caring smile. He is Joel Fish, director of Philadelphia's Center for Sport Psychology, and, during the last two decades, a consulting sports psychologist for the Sixers, Flyers and Phillies - all of whom seem intent on driving their fans mad. So while Larry Brown, Charlie Manuel and Peter Laviolette may have been tasked with getting athletes to execute physically during the era of Iverson, J-Roll and Bryzgalov, "Dr. Joel" was on hand to help with players' psyches.
NEWS
April 8, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Albert Levitt, 87, of Flourtown, a retired chief psychologist for the Philadelphia Common Pleas Court, died Thursday, March 26, at home of complications from Parkinson's disease. Born and reared in Logan, Dr. Levitt moved to Flourtown in 1980. He quit high school to join the Army in December 1945 and was honorably discharged in October 1947. When he returned stateside, Dr. Levitt finished high school at Temple High School. He went on to earn undergraduate and master's degrees from Temple University.
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Don Tollefson's sentencing Wednesday proved no less bizarre than his trial, with a psychologist claiming that the former sportscaster told him that his mother forced him to sleep in her bed throughout his childhood and well into college. But the proceeding mostly focused on the fallen icon's future and his potential for redemption. After fleecing 200 people in a sports ticket-selling scheme, Tollefson was sentenced by a Bucks County judge to two to four years in state prison and 15 years' probation for felony money laundering, fraud, and theft.
NEWS
February 17, 2015
ISSUE | CREDENTIALS Qualified, unlicensed There are many qualified, competent, and expert therapists who lack a Pennsylvania license ("Abuse expert lacks Pa. license," Feb. 7). As a Pennsylvania-certified - but not licensed - psychotherapist, I want to reassure Inquirer readers who followed news of the perjury charges against a psychologist over her expert-witness testimony: They can and will get excellent therapy from unlicensed individuals. The real issue in the case of child-abuse expert Sue Cornbluth is that an individual allegedly lied about her credentials.
NEWS
January 31, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dorothy June Brown, 77, has some problems remembering dates, her age, the year, and where she went to school, but a forensic psychologist said she is competent to be retried on charges that she defrauded the charter schools she founded of $6.3 million. Christine Anthony, who examined Brown in Texas last fall, gave that assessment via videoconference Thursday, the second day of Brown's competency hearing in federal court. Anthony said she interviewed Brown four times during her court-ordered monthlong stay at the Federal Medical Center Carswell in Fort Worth.
NEWS
January 12, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
When Paul Rozin was growing up, his parent thought food waste was terrible, telling him to "finish your food. Think of the starving children in Europe. " The psychology worked. "I would eat my food," he said. Now, Rozin is a cultural psychologist at the University of Pennsylvania, and one of his research areas is food attitudes. He spoke recently at the Last Food Mile, a national conference on food waste sponsored by the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine. Food waste happens all along the supply chain, from farms to stores to restaurants, but waste in the American home is the single largest component, with the average family of four discarding an estimated 1,164 pounds of food a year - about three pounds a day. A third of that is inedibles, such as chicken bones and orange peels.
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
All of humanity's problems stem from man's inability to sit quietly in a room alone.   - Blaise Pascal   I'm so bored I want to tear my hair out. We all know that feeling. Yet until recently, boredom has been seldom studied. Perhaps it's because we believe it's an ethical category. As we like to say, idle hands are the devil's workshop. But psychologists finally seem interested in the topic. And a spate of studies suggest that boredom actually poses a threat to health - life, even.
NEWS
May 29, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leon B. Cohen, 92, who earned a Bronze Star in combat during World War II and was a psychologist at the Philadelphia VA Medical Center from 1959 to 1981, died Sunday, May 25, at the retirement community Cadbury at Cherry Hill. For a time, Dr. Cohen was head of psychological services for the center, a son, Mark, said in a phone interview. Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., he graduated from the Franklin K. Lane High School there in 1938 and began his college studies at night at Brooklyn College while working during the day. In 1943, he was drafted into the Army and, a month after D-Day in 1944, landed in France as a litter bearer with a medical unit, working with it all the way to the Elbe River in eastern Germany.
NEWS
February 24, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Everyone has ups and downs, but there are times when parents may notice their college-age children are showing signs of real trouble and need a therapist. It might be as obvious as a drop in school performance, or as subtle as a sudden and consistent mood change. But unlike a physical ailment, in which parents could consult a doctor, mental health issues often carry a stigma, and parents may be reluctant to send an overstressed or depressed child to a therapist. They may not know where to look for one. Or money may be an issue.
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