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September 23, 2011
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2002 | By DAVID BLEILER & DAVID GORGOS For the Daily News
The idea of "honor among thieves" may have become somewhat of a cliche in the movies since the days Humphrey Bogart and Edward G. Robinson doubled-crossed their own, but there's little familiar or commonplace in the merits of two new video releases this week that take a rigorous look at "the heist" and the men and women who pull them. In the running for an Academy Award next week, Ben Kingsley gives a riveting portrayal of malevolence in the British thriller "Sexy Beast" (VHS: priced for rental; DVD: $29.99)
NEWS
February 20, 1998 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Murray Benimoff, 72, a professor emeritus of Glassboro State College and a longtime leader in the Eastern Psychological Association, died Thursday at West Jersey Hospital-Marlton. A Cherry Hill resident for the last 40 years, he was born and raised in New York City, where he was a 1947 graduate of City College of New York. He received his master's and doctoral degrees from Ohio State University. Dr. Benimoff was a professor of psychology at Glassboro State College, now Rowan University, from 1956 until 1988.
NEWS
May 17, 1991 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
This is a Philadelphia story of courts and connections. It stars Margaret Jean Sosnowski, former nun, Frank Rizzo appointee, Democrat for Reagan. It seems her professional background includes being fired from a private medical office for not having a psychologist's license. And being forced out of a state welfare job after allegations of improper insurance billing. And claiming a psychology degree she doesn't have. No matter. A couple of years ago Family Court created a new job with an important title: assistant chief of the medical branch.
NEWS
February 9, 1999 | By David Boldt
Let us now praise Martin E. P. Seligman, who has just completed a banner year crusading against what he perceives as the twin evils of victimology and the self-esteem movement. This is not the story of some maverick taking on the psychological establishment. Quite the contrary. Seligman, a professor of psychology at Penn, is president of the American Psychological Association, and is widely known for research he has done on what he calls "learned helplessness," along with his work validating the effectiveness of psychological therapy.
NEWS
April 7, 1988 | By Francie Scott, Special to The Inquirer
A Montgomery County woman who police said worked illegally as a clinical psychologist was sentenced yesterday to five years of probation after pleading guilty in court to practicing psychology without a license. Jacquelyn Cushman, 42, of the 8500 block of Trumbauer Drive, Springfield, also was fined $500 and ordered to pay court costs and restitution to four former clients by Common Pleas Court Judge William W. Vogel. Under the terms of Cushman's probation, which was negotiated by Montgomery County District Attorney Michael D. Marino and Cushman's attorney, Jean B. Green, Cushman is required to receive psychiatric counseling.
NEWS
June 6, 1993 | By Arlene Martin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The dreams and aspirations of boyhood can lead to success and achievement in manhood. That's one observation that Daniel Hart makes in his new book, Becoming Men: The Development of Aspirations, Values, and Adaptational Styles, which sifts through the complex passage from youth to manhood. Hart, 36, an associate professor in psychology at Rutgers University since 1984, has been intrigued with the stages of human development since his days as an undergraduate at Bates College in Maine.
NEWS
July 9, 1998 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Mildred Eckhardt Hamilton, 83, a retired professor of psychology, died Thursday at her residence in the Cadbury, Cherry Hill. Born in York, Pa., she resided in Philadelphia for more than 50 years before moving to Cadbury in 1994. Mrs. Hamilton was an associate professor of child psychology at Queens College in New York City from 1949 until retiring in 1974. She was particularly remembered for her expertise in the areas of child psychology and intelligence tests, and taught courses in both fields.
NEWS
October 30, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dr. Lester B. Luborsky, 89, an emeritus psychology professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, died of Alzheimer's disease Oct. 22 at his Philadelphia home. Born in Philadelphia, he graduated from Central High School in 1938 and earned his bachelor's degree from Pennsylvania State University in 1942. After earning his doctorate in psychology at Duke University in 1945, he was an instructor at the University of Illinois for two years before working as a senior psychologist from 1947 to 1959 at the Menninger Foundation in Topeka, Kan. In 1959, he became an assistant professor of psychology in psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania, and became a full professor of psychology in psychiatry in 1968.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 26, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Harry J. Woehr was an Army Air Corps operations officer at what might have seemed a safe harbor from all the killing during World War II. Though Japanese troops occupied pieces of the Aleutian Islands in Alaska, Mr. Woehr was at a safer base there. He experienced loss of life there, just not American. As part of a wartime program that transferred American airplanes to the Soviet Union, "he was involved in helping to get the Russian pilots to take off" and head home over a narrow strip of the Bering Sea, daughter Leslie Tuttle said in a phone interview.
NEWS
October 6, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rutgers has unintentionally become the site of an experiment for the 21st century: How does a university operate without Internet, email, or course-management systems? Students and faculty were forced to find out last week when a cyber attack disabled Rutgers' networks for most of a work day. A psychology graduate student, just days from defending his master's thesis, resorted to reading tiny PDFs on his phone. Undergrads taking economics depended on documents downloaded to personal devices - at the beginning-of-the-semester urging of their professor.
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | BY STEVEN REA, Inquirer Staff Writer srea@phillynews.com, 215-854-5629
"INSIDE OUT" is the first psychological thriller that's fun for the whole family. Really psychological. And really fun. The central characters in Pixar's crazy-inventive animated adventure aren't talking toys, or cars or monsters. They're emotions: Joy, Fear, Anger, Disgust and Sadness, all jockeying for control in the "headquarters" of a pre-teen girl. That is, from the control room in her head. Connected to HQ is a vast mindscape: a long-term memory area, "personality islands" built on core experiences, Imagination Land, and sectors dedicated to abstract thinking and the subconscious (it's spooky there)
NEWS
February 8, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Going by her resumé, Sue Cornbluth knows child abuse. She has a doctorate in psychology and claims to be a "nationally recognized mental health expert. " She teaches at Temple University and has appeared on television to discuss traumas such as the Jerry Sandusky scandal. But Cornbluth lacks a state license. And now she is accused of perjury for allegedly lying about it. The felony charge, filed last week in Bucks County, states that Cornbluth claimed to have a license when she served as an expert witness in a 2013 custody battle.
NEWS
December 31, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Sitting in a Florida jail after being charged with drunken driving, Andrew J. Assini had no one to call and no one to blame. He was 24. "I realized," he recalls, "that maybe I had some part in the never-ending calamity that was my life. I realized, 'Something has to change here.' It was the end of the road. " Since then, nine clean and sober years - and a continuing spiritual quest - have helped Assini replace calamities with accomplishments. The Deptford resident, 33, has earned undergraduate and graduate degrees at Rowan University, where he's an instructor in the psychology department.
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Aloe Blacc is a pretty serious guy. The socially conscious, California-born rapper-turned-singer graduated from the University of Southern California with honors in communications and linguistics/psychology and had a short business career before going into music, having hits like "I Need a Dollar," "Wake Me Up" (with Avicii), and "The Man," the latter from his 2013 album Lift Your Spirit . He gets a chance to show off his skills tonight at Camden's Susquehanna Center when he opens for Bruno Mars.
NEWS
February 3, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
On Groundhog Day, one is tempted to wonder how a supersized rodent came to be a symbol of hope. Perhaps those tourists flocking to an obscure patch of Pennsylvania called Gobbler's Knob only think they've come to see a seer named Punxsutawney Phil. They may instead be acting upon a universal human yearning for community, for a respite from the isolation imposed by, say, an Arctic vortex. These Punxsutawney pilgrims may simply be expressing our communal wish for better weather.
NEWS
October 11, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dean Peabody III, 85, of Media, who retired as a professor of psychology at Swarthmore College in September 1995 after more than 30 years on the faculty, died of respiratory failure Sunday, Sept. 29, after body surfing near his home in Sea Isle City, N.J. Swarthmore president Rebecca Chopp noted in an e-mailed statement to the college community that "the college has lost not just a brilliant scholar and mentor to countless students and peers alike, but one of its most dedicated and revered members.
NEWS
September 21, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hurricanes can flood homes, tear down boardwalks, make beaches disappear. They might also shape people's beliefs about climate change and their attitudes toward "green" policies, suggests new research from a Rutgers psychology professor. In a pair of studies by Laurie A. Rudman, a psychology professor at the New Brunswick campus, students were asked their opinions of climate change and asked whether they would vote for a fictional "green" politician over one who opposed policies such as raising fuel costs.
NEWS
August 6, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Many Americans disdain the poor - and science proves it. When people were placed in neuroimaging machines and shown photos of the poor and homeless, their brains responded as though the photos depicted things, not humans - a sign of revulsion. Advocates for the poor aren't surprised, saying enmity toward the needy runs thick. Antipoverty types cite as evidence the ubiquitous calls from state and federal officials to cut food stamps and energy assistance; eliminate or reduce General Assistance, Social Security, Medicaid, Head Start, and welfare; fingerprint anyone receiving benefits; and so on. "Americans react to the poor with disgust," said Susan Fiske, professor of psychology and public affairs at Princeton University and the designer of the neuroimaging tests.
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