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Psychotherapy

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NEWS
February 13, 1989 | By Julia M. Klein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carole Henley's face still contorts with pain when she remembers the murder of her son, Donald, more than a decade ago. "He had been stabbed 16 times. His throat was slit. He'd been sodomized. He was 12 years old," she said. Her son's murderer, Charles M. Wantland, had killed before. But he had been paroled after serving less than six years of a 30-year sentence at the Patuxent Institution, an unusual maximum-security prison that uses psychotherapy to rehabilitate criminals.
NEWS
October 22, 2000 | By Jacob Quinn Sanders, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Jonathan Labman has managed a New York art gallery and studied to become a Presbyterian minister. He has been an actor and a masseur. All the while, Labman, 45, has tried healing: first himself, then others. Labman grew up in Yardley, attending public school until he felt forced to leave Pennsbury High School after the 10th grade, in 1971. He finished at a private school in Wales on a scholarship for which he applied. He recalls walking the halls of Pennsbury and hearing students call him "fairy" and "mama's boy. " "I didn't know what homosexuality was at the time," Labman said.
NEWS
February 25, 2016
By Nancy Gerber The current trend of increasing sales of adult coloring books points to an unmet need in many people's lives for some quiet, creative time. The books also highlight how the creation of art can diminish stress, increase imagination, and foster thoughtfulness. However, many of those coloring books are also marketed as "art therapy. " Lost in the enthusiastic response to the trend is the distinction that coloring, indeed a therapeutic activity, is not actually psychotherapy.
NEWS
October 10, 2003 | By Jerry Vaccaro
"If only we had known" is a sadly common refrain following suicide. Family, friends, coworkers and even mental-health professionals often miss the signals. This is National Mental Health Awareness Week, a time to be aware of the devastating impact of mental health disorders. It is also a time to appreciate the highly effective treatments available today. Above all, it is a time to reflect that too many people still suffer needlessly with diagnosable conditions and clinical risks that go undetected and untreated.
NEWS
December 21, 1986
Another grand celebration with fireworks and modern laser effects. This time to honor the completion of the new One Liberty Place building. True, it's usually no fun to put a damper on celebrations of this nature. The show was quite spectacular and Philadelphia has the right to pat itself on the back for another step forward in modern construction and modern celebration. But what about new buildings to aid the city's homeless? Not just buildings where these people will sit around, eat and sleep, but with programs that offer mental-health screenings, psychotherapy and options counseling.
NEWS
October 5, 1995 | By Edward A. Robinson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Jeffrey M. Auve is going back to prison. The 39-year-old Drexel Hill man, convicted by a jury in May for severely choking a woman during sex, was sentenced yesterday to a minimum of 5 1/2 years in state prison by Chester County Judge Lawrence E. Wood. He received a 5-to-10-year term for aggravated assault and a 6-to-23-month term, to run afterward, for resisting arrest. It was Auve's sixth conviction for choking and assaulting a woman during sex. Auve served 10 years in state prison for an assault in Upper Darby in 1979.
NEWS
August 28, 1993 | By Maura Webber, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Burlington City motorist who struck and fatally injured a bike rider with his car was sentenced yesterday to 45 days in the county prison and ordered to pay the victim's family up to $4,800 in psychotherapy bills. Judge Cornelius P. Sullivan of Burlington County Superior Court imposed the unusual sentence on Douglas F. Bass, 41, after a lengthy plea from the widow of Robert Durham for restitution. Durham, 35, died in 1990 two weeks after he was hit on River Road in Burlington Township.
NEWS
June 26, 1996 | New York Daily News
New Age egghead Jean Houston says she's no guru. But she's also apparently not everything she's cracked up to be. A New York Daily News check of her lengthy resume raised several questions about the background of the prolific author and Human Potential Movement pioneer who enjoys the ear of first lady Hillary Clinton. Among them: Her resume and reams of promotional material issued by her publisher claim she completed her doctoral studies at Columbia University. The school says she never got the degree.
NEWS
July 23, 1991
You pay Margaret Jean Sosnowski $47,958 a year. She is supervisor of Family Court's medical branch, including psychiatrists, psychologists and a physician. Until she needed a job a couple of years ago, they got along without a supervisor. She is as qualified for the job as she is to be a National Football League cornerback. Philadelphians began paying her in 1977 when she came home from a career as a nun and high school counselor. Her daddy, a committeeman, passed word that Maggie was back in town.
NEWS
April 25, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jane Ward Newhall, 68, of Penn Valley, a child psychologist, died of ovarian cancer Tuesday at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Dr. Newhall was director of psychotherapy services at the Child Study Institute at Bryn Mawr College for 12 years. She initiated a social-skills program for young people, supervised testing, and provided psychotherapy and counseling to patients and their families at the institute. She also lectured to graduate students at Bryn Mawr. Dr. Newhall previously was on the staff of the Philadelphia Child Guidance Center for five years and was an associate faculty member in the department of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.
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NEWS
March 31, 2016
ISSUE | BIPOLAR DAY There is help, hope World Bipolar Day is marked annually on March 30. Bipolar disorder is a medical condition of the brain in which a person's moods swing back and forth like the winds of March. Diagnosed individuals - who encompass all ages, from children on up - can do quite well. Oscar-winning actress Patty Duke, 69, who died Tuesday, suffered from the disorder. What's needed is an excellent psychiatrist, a psychotherapist, and a support group, in which people like us learn from one another.
NEWS
February 25, 2016
By Nancy Gerber The current trend of increasing sales of adult coloring books points to an unmet need in many people's lives for some quiet, creative time. The books also highlight how the creation of art can diminish stress, increase imagination, and foster thoughtfulness. However, many of those coloring books are also marketed as "art therapy. " Lost in the enthusiastic response to the trend is the distinction that coloring, indeed a therapeutic activity, is not actually psychotherapy.
NEWS
January 13, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maurie Pressman, 91, of Philadelphia, a psychiatrist who ran a clinic aimed at spiritual and physical wellness, died Monday, Jan. 6, of a stroke at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. As medical director and founder of the Pressman Center for Mind/Body Wellness in Society Hill Towers, North, he explored the links between traditional psychiatry and mankind's spiritual proclivities. From youth, Dr. Pressman was torn between becoming a physician or a rabbi, and that spiritual longing never ceased, he told columnist Art Carey in an August 2013 Inquirer column.
NEWS
November 3, 2012 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
A small group of therapists who have been bucking the psychiatric mainstream for almost 40 years is meeting in Philadelphia on Friday to talk about how to help those with mental illnesses without prescribing drugs. The International Society for Ethical Psychology and Psychiatry opposes the medical or biological model of mental illness that sees medications as a way to combat chemical or structural problems in the brain. The group sees even the most serious of mental illnesses, maladies like schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, as a reaction to trauma, emotional pain or conflict, said Al Galves, a retired psychologist in New Mexico who is the society's executive director.
NEWS
April 25, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jane Ward Newhall, 68, of Penn Valley, a child psychologist, died of ovarian cancer Tuesday at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Dr. Newhall was director of psychotherapy services at the Child Study Institute at Bryn Mawr College for 12 years. She initiated a social-skills program for young people, supervised testing, and provided psychotherapy and counseling to patients and their families at the institute. She also lectured to graduate students at Bryn Mawr. Dr. Newhall previously was on the staff of the Philadelphia Child Guidance Center for five years and was an associate faculty member in the department of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.
NEWS
March 17, 2008 | By Dan Gottlieb
Marge was 48 years old when she came to my office last year complaining of depression. She said her marriage was "comfortable, but without passion. " Her teenage children were doing well, but she was worried about paying tuition when the time came. Her work life had been stable for 15 years. And then she woke up one day and realized that, at her age, many of her professional dreams would never come true. And she would probably be spending the rest of her life in her merely "comfortable" marriage.
NEWS
October 10, 2003 | By Jerry Vaccaro
"If only we had known" is a sadly common refrain following suicide. Family, friends, coworkers and even mental-health professionals often miss the signals. This is National Mental Health Awareness Week, a time to be aware of the devastating impact of mental health disorders. It is also a time to appreciate the highly effective treatments available today. Above all, it is a time to reflect that too many people still suffer needlessly with diagnosable conditions and clinical risks that go undetected and untreated.
NEWS
August 14, 2003
Fame likely played a role in Kobe Bryant case As a female who has never been raped, my heart goes out to Rhyan Romaine and other victims like her ("Shattering judgments," Metro Commentary Page, Aug. 8). However, I would like to add there are some cases where, yes, the woman must surely admit to some blame. I am referring to the Kobe Bryant case. While we all know that something happened in that room, I ask myself over and over again, if Kobe Bryant was my son - a no-named, no-face, regular black man - would that woman even have given him the time of day, much less agree to go to his room when she had just met him?
NEWS
June 8, 2003 | By Stacey Burling and Jillian McKoy INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Here it is, the second week of June and your raincoat has gotten more use than your grill. You haven't needed sunscreen or wanted ice-cold lemonade. You've stared day after day at steel-gray skies that look more like late fall than late spring. If all this gloom is putting you in a bad mood, join the crowd. Area therapists say they're hearing from patients and non-patients alike who find themselves feeling cranky and sluggish. "A general sense of hope is not as easy to maintain when it's like this," said Tracey Ellenbogen, a social worker who does psychotherapy in private practice and at Belmont Center for Comprehensive Treatment.
NEWS
July 1, 2001 | By Lini S. Kadaba Lini S. Kadaba is an Inquirer staff writer
The black psychiatrist's couch is absent, of course. Here at the Beck Institute of Cognitive Therapy and Research in Bala Cynwyd, psychotherapy takes place at a small, round table stocked with a couple of spare, hard plastic chairs. Chairs to work in, not relax. On Wednesdays, psychiatrist Aaron T. Beck, the renowned father of cognitive therapy - simply put, the anti-Freud - consults on the most difficult cases. On this particular day, he settles himself next to a troubled woman in her 40s who shifts nervously in her seat.
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