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NEWS
January 24, 2008
Dr. Steve Silver, a Vietnam vet who served for 26 years as  director of the inpatient PTSD program at the Coatesville V.A. Medical Center, recommends these services and Web sites to veterans and their families.  Also here is information on traumatic brain injury, considered to be the signature injury of the Iraq War. Veterans Administration V eterans of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom are eligible for two years worth of services from the V.A. after their return (that eligibility may be increased this year)
NEWS
September 6, 2011 | By LINDSEY TANNER, Associated Press
CHICAGO - A study of students' reactions to shootings on their Illinois college campus gives fresh insight into how genes may influence the psychological impact of traumatic events. The researchers found that symptoms similar to post-traumatic stress disorder were more common in Northern Illinois University students who had certain variations in a gene that regulates levels of serotonin, a brain chemical linked with mood that is the target of popular antidepressants. The researchers say the results could someday lead to new treatments for PTSD, and also could help predict who will develop the condition, which could be useful for soldiers involved in combat.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2012 | By David Sell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Concerned about "suspicions" of overprescribing antipsychotic drugs, the Pentagon took steps in the last few weeks to limit the use of those powerful medicines to treat the growing legion of war fighters suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. For Stan and Shirley White, the limits can't go into effect soon enough because, in their case, it's already too late. The retired educators' youngest son, Andrew, was an Eagle scout, a baseball player, and an honor student in high school near the family home in Cross Lanes, W.Va.
NEWS
November 11, 2010
WAR IS HELL. It always has been. But for generations of soldiers who suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder, peace also has proven nothing short of hellish. PTSD has been called by different names - like "shell shock" in World War I or "combat fatigue" in World War II - but it is the same, inevitable human response to the experience of combat. It doesn't matter if the war was thought to be "good" or "bad," or if its returning soldiers were hailed as heroes or spat upon or ignored.
NEWS
March 9, 2008 | By Tom Infield INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Of all the things that Alpha Company has had to struggle with since it came home from Iraq, the most pervasive may be post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD. Of the 126 veterans interviewed or surveyed by The Inquirer, almost half - 46 percent - said they had been treated for PTSD, most at VA hospitals and clinics in the region. Alpha's rate of PTSD is higher than that of most U.S. troops who served in Iraq or Afghanistan - partly, no doubt, as a result of its being a frontline combat unit that lost six men. Shelley M. MacDermid, a Purdue University professor who served on a Defense Department mental-health task force last year, said typical PTSD rates among returning veterans were about 14 percent.
NEWS
March 9, 2008 | By Tom Infield, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Of all the things that Alpha Company has had to struggle with since it came home from Iraq, the most pervasive may be post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD. Of the 126 veterans interviewed or surveyed by The Inquirer, almost half - 46 percent - said they had been treated for PTSD, most at VA hospitals and clinics in the region. Alpha's rate of PTSD is higher than that of most U.S. troops who served in Iraq or Afghanistan - partly, no doubt, as a result of its being a frontline combat unit that lost six men. Shelley M. MacDermid, a Purdue University professor who served on a Defense Department mental-health task force last year, said typical PTSD rates among returning veterans were about 14 percent.
NEWS
March 28, 2007
JOHN GRANT'S op-ed defense of Commer Glass does a disservice to all veterans who suffer the effects of post-traumatic stress disorder. John Grant is an editor of the Veterans for Peace newsletter, in which Mr. Glass admits that he killed two Vietnamese prostitutes, plus an unarmed woman and her baby, before he murdered his ex-girlfriend. Mr. Grant's defense of the indefensible diminishes the ability of average combat vets to gain the support they need for being made whole.
NEWS
July 7, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tyhira Stovall closed her eyes. Yawned. Swiveled back and forth in her chair. Played with the edges of her jacket. Sighed. "Ok" she said, taking a breath of courage. "Ok. " But no words came. The thoughts, though, did. Poison whispers drifting out of shadows, through the cracks in the closed doors inside her head. She covered her face with her hands. Turned her head to the wall. "Oh God," she said, and began to sob. She was 17. It had been less than a year since her boyfriend had set her up, handing her off to friends who stripped her, forced her to dance and raped her. Tyhira had dropped out of school.
NEWS
March 25, 2012 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
Of the 40-student cast and crew, nearly half have a friend or family member in the military. So if ever there was a time and place to reimagine Shakespeare's Macbeth as a tragedy of modern war, it's now, at West Chester University. Macbeth himself (Philadelphia senior Jim Vadala) just spent spring break reconnecting with buddies back with their own war stories to share. Shannon Kearns, a junior Gentlewoman, rushes to the computer to check on a deployed pal from the Poconos whenever she hears of a skirmish in Afghanistan.
NEWS
January 2, 2011 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
The handsome man on the videotape was reliving a very bad memory, and he was doing it amazingly well. His eyes were closed. He was speaking in present tense. His voice was shaking, and he was sniffling. His whole body looked wired. He wanted to cure his post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and he was doing exactly what his new therapist had told him to do. He was mentally putting himself back in the night that most terrified him, one that had haunted him with flashbacks and nightmares for nine years.
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NEWS
September 17, 2014 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
SHE SPENT THE weekends in her car, driving from one corner of the city to another, looking for something that she couldn't quite put her finger on. On the one hand, Joan Ryan, the director of recovery services for the Philadelphia Department of Veteran Affairs, had an idea of what she was searching for: a building that could house 40 military veterans. But it needed to be more than just walls and a roof. It needed to be a sanctuary for people whose lives had fallen to pieces, a place that could help them learn to stand again - and in a way that few VA facilities had ever tried.
NEWS
July 7, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tyhira Stovall closed her eyes. Yawned. Swiveled back and forth in her chair. Played with the edges of her jacket. Sighed. "Ok" she said, taking a breath of courage. "Ok. " But no words came. The thoughts, though, did. Poison whispers drifting out of shadows, through the cracks in the closed doors inside her head. She covered her face with her hands. Turned her head to the wall. "Oh God," she said, and began to sob. She was 17. It had been less than a year since her boyfriend had set her up, handing her off to friends who stripped her, forced her to dance and raped her. Tyhira had dropped out of school.
NEWS
November 20, 2013 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
THE LITTLE GIRL could coax a smile from Tim Gill even when he had none left. She'd seen Gill, a Philadelphia firefighter who served in Iraq with the Pennsylvania National Guard, sprint to the sink, doubled over with nausea. She whispered when Gill's headaches came and tiptoed during his bad dreams, but he remained the man she adored most. A few days before the funeral, she drew a picture of Gill, a stick figure sticking out its tongue, smiling for her one last time. "DADDY," 4-year-old Amanda Gill wrote above the figure's head.
NEWS
June 23, 2013 | By Leila Haghighat, Inquirer Staff Writer
Henry Costo was only 20 when he was sent to his first fatal fire. He raced up to a third-floor apartment on Girard Avenue, where a teenage girl was reportedly trapped. He grabbed her feet, pulled her dead body closer, and realized something was wrong. There were too many limbs. Costo turned to his partner to share what he had found: two girls, hugging each other, realizing they would die. But driving back home, Costo didn't feel a thing. "I remember thinking, 'There must be something wrong with me. Am I that hardened?
NEWS
March 24, 2013 | By Pauline Jelinek, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A veteran of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, former Marine Capt. Timothy Kudo thinks of himself as a killer - and he carries the guilt every day. "I can't forgive myself," he says. "And the people who can forgive me are dead. " With American troops at war for more than a decade, there has been an unprecedented number of studies into war-zone psychology and an evolving understanding of post-traumatic stress disorder. Clinicians suspect some troops are suffering from what they call "moral injuries" - wounds from having done something, or failed to stop something, that violates their moral code.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2012 | By Catherine Laughlin, For The Inquirer
The unkempt man was wearing fatigues, standing in the street and holding a sign that read, "Vietnam vet. Please help. God bless. " The year was 2005 and Barbara Van Dahlen, a licensed clinical psychologist, was driving with her then-9-year-old daughter, who asked why the man was begging in the world's richest country. It was a moment that helped propel Van Dahlen into her official mission, the founding that year of Give an Hour, a national nonprofit providing free mental health services to military personnel and their families affected by the wars in Afghanistan, Iraq, and other post-9/11 conflicts.
NEWS
October 26, 2012 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer
JERRY GRANTLAND grew up in Lansdowne, enlisted in the Army right out of Cardinal O'Hara High School, deployed to Iraq in 2003 and was on reconnaissance patrol in an armored personnel carrier when a roadside bomb exploded. He wasn't wounded physically. But after eight months of hypervigilance in Iraq, always ready to run for cover from frequent mortar attacks, Grantland came home to a National Guard assignment in Texas, suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. "I was driving 75 miles-an-hour on I-10 when I saw a couple of guys at the side of the road who looked like they were duct-taping something to the guardrail," said Grantland, now 28 and living in Roxborough.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2012 | By David Sell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Concerned about "suspicions" of overprescribing antipsychotic drugs, the Pentagon took steps in the last few weeks to limit the use of those powerful medicines to treat the growing legion of war fighters suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. For Stan and Shirley White, the limits can't go into effect soon enough because, in their case, it's already too late. The retired educators' youngest son, Andrew, was an Eagle scout, a baseball player, and an honor student in high school near the family home in Cross Lanes, W.Va.
NEWS
April 12, 2012 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
America's first and second ladies made a show here Wednesday of enlisting the nation's three million nurses in their Joining Forces program to improve services for soldiers and their families. At the University of Pennsylvania's Irvine Auditorium, Michelle Obama and Jill Biden thanked 150 nursing organizations and 450 nursing schools for pledging to train current and future nurses to treat soldiers with post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, post-deployment depression, and other visible and invisible wounds of war. "This is truly amazing what you're doing," Obama told the crowd of about 1,100 nurses, nursing students, nursing organization leaders, deans of nursing schools, and a few soldiers.
NEWS
March 25, 2012 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
Of the 40-student cast and crew, nearly half have a friend or family member in the military. So if ever there was a time and place to reimagine Shakespeare's Macbeth as a tragedy of modern war, it's now, at West Chester University. Macbeth himself (Philadelphia senior Jim Vadala) just spent spring break reconnecting with buddies back with their own war stories to share. Shannon Kearns, a junior Gentlewoman, rushes to the computer to check on a deployed pal from the Poconos whenever she hears of a skirmish in Afghanistan.
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