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NEWS
September 17, 2014 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
SHE SPENT THE weekends in her car, driving from one corner of the city to another, looking for something that she couldn't quite put her finger on. On the one hand, Joan Ryan, the director of recovery services for the Philadelphia Department of Veteran Affairs, had an idea of what she was searching for: a building that could house 40 military veterans. But it needed to be more than just walls and a roof. It needed to be a sanctuary for people whose lives had fallen to pieces, a place that could help them learn to stand again - and in a way that few VA facilities had ever tried.
NEWS
August 8, 2011
Risk factors linked to sudden cardiac death University of Pennsylvania researchers have identified risk factors that put postmenopausal women with heart disease at high risk of sudden cardiac death - abruptly dying of a lethal arrythmia. Currently, the only established risk factor for sudden cardiac death is weak heart contractions, measured by an echocardiogram. But many heart disease patients whose heart develops a lethal arrythmia don't have this weakening. For their study, the Penn researchers analyzed data from a previous study of 2,763 postmenopausal heart disease patients.
NEWS
April 17, 1996 | By Anna Husarska
One psychiatrist-cum-war criminal turned this city into hell. Now Sarajevo's other psychiatrists are exorcising the consequences. For almost four years, as his soldiers were shelling the town where he once lived and worked, Radovan Karadzic, the Bosnian Serb leader and accused war criminal, used his keen understanding of the trauma brought by terror to destroy the minds of Sarajevans, old, young and very young. Today, there is no war here - at least not in the military sense. Children can play outside without fear of mortars, soldiers are demobilized, and families are reunited as refugees timidly return.
NEWS
September 29, 2004 | By Alison Young INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
U.S. Secretary of Veterans Affairs Anthony J. Principi said Tuesday yesterday that the violent guerrilla tactics used by insurgents in Iraq would take a considerable toll on the mental health of troops, resulting in a lifetime of disability payments for many of those who return from war. So far, 20 percent of returning Iraq veterans who have sought VA care have done so for mental-health issues. While the exact cost of compensating those injured in the Iraq war is uncertain, the VA already expects to pay $600 billion over the next three decades in disability payments to veterans of earlier wars.
NEWS
December 14, 2006 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jeffrey Corcoran was manning a security checkpoint in Baquba, Iraq, on that deadly day in 2003 when four insurgents with AK-47s jumped out of a car and began firing. A lieutenant, "a real nice guy who was more of a friend than an officer," was cut down in the cross fire in front of Corcoran and died. At the time, Corcoran, an infantry mortarman from Strasburg, Lancaster County, didn't have the luxury of sorting out his feelings about what had happened. That came after he left the service in February 2004 - and found he couldn't sleep, concentrate or hold a job. He was angry, physically sick, and uneasy without a weapon.
NEWS
January 28, 1990 | By Jerry W. Byrd, Inquirer Staff Writer
The last of the Soviet troops left Afghanistan in February 1989, going home after more than nine years of war to a reception that mirrored in many ways that faced by returning U.S. veterans of the Vietnam War. Speeches boasting of the "soldier-internationalists" who had done their duty failed to mask the indifference of a nation going about its business, glad to be done with an unpopular war. Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev was on...
NEWS
January 2, 2011 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
The handsome man on the videotape was reliving a very bad memory, and he was doing it amazingly well. His eyes were closed. He was speaking in present tense. His voice was shaking, and he was sniffling. His whole body looked wired. He wanted to cure his post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and he was doing exactly what his new therapist had told him to do. He was mentally putting himself back in the night that most terrified him, one that had haunted him with flashbacks and nightmares for nine years.
NEWS
May 26, 2006
Veterans need our help with stress disorder There are servicemen and women returning from the Iraq war with memories that will haunt them. These Americans need help, more help than we gave to Vietnam veterans, some of whom are suffering recurrences of post-traumatic stress disorder as a result of exposure to news of the Iraq war. I lost someone to PTSD. No, he wasn't some crazy lost soul. He was a business school graduate, an international finance expert, and eventually a successful minister.
NEWS
May 16, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Passengers who survived this week's Amtrak crash may have a rough month ahead of them, psychologically speaking, but most will recover on their own without much help from professionals. "Most people will naturally figure this out and come out of it," said David Yusko, clinical director of the University of Pennsylvania's Center for the Treatment and Study of Anxiety. Predicting who won't is more challenging, he said. He and Kenneth Reinhard, a New York psychologist who worked for decades at a VA hospital, agreed that educating people about what they are likely to feel - normalizing those painful emotions - would help them accept and process their responses.
NEWS
March 22, 2012 | By Donna Cassata, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Army inspector general is conducting a systemwide review of mental-health facilities to determine whether psychiatrists overturned diagnoses of post-traumatic stress disorder to save money. The move comes as the case of a U.S. soldier suspected of killing 16 Afghan civilians has brought fresh attention to the strains of war. Army Secretary John McHugh told Congress on Wednesday that the Army was trying to determine whether the change in diagnosis was isolated or a common practice.
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