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Ptsd

NEWS
January 28, 1990 | By Jerry W. Byrd, Inquirer Staff Writer
The last of the Soviet troops left Afghanistan in February 1989, going home after more than nine years of war to a reception that mirrored in many ways that faced by returning U.S. veterans of the Vietnam War. Speeches boasting of the "soldier-internationalists" who had done their duty failed to mask the indifference of a nation going about its business, glad to be done with an unpopular war. Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev was on...
NEWS
May 26, 2006
Veterans need our help with stress disorder There are servicemen and women returning from the Iraq war with memories that will haunt them. These Americans need help, more help than we gave to Vietnam veterans, some of whom are suffering recurrences of post-traumatic stress disorder as a result of exposure to news of the Iraq war. I lost someone to PTSD. No, he wasn't some crazy lost soul. He was a business school graduate, an international finance expert, and eventually a successful minister.
NEWS
March 22, 2012 | By Donna Cassata, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Army inspector general is conducting a systemwide review of mental-health facilities to determine whether psychiatrists overturned diagnoses of post-traumatic stress disorder to save money. The move comes as the case of a U.S. soldier suspected of killing 16 Afghan civilians has brought fresh attention to the strains of war. Army Secretary John McHugh told Congress on Wednesday that the Army was trying to determine whether the change in diagnosis was isolated or a common practice.
NEWS
April 14, 2005 | By Chris Adams INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Citing the large numbers of military personnel returning from Iraq with psychiatric disorders, lawmakers introduced legislation yesterday in the House of Representatives that would expand veterans' health services and study why veterans' mental-disability payments vary widely across the country. The bill follows a March report in The Inquirer and other newspapers owned by Knight Ridder that the regional offices of the Department of Veterans Affairs produced inconsistent results when it came to determining a veteran's degree of disability and amount of compensation.
NEWS
October 26, 2012 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer
JERRY GRANTLAND grew up in Lansdowne, enlisted in the Army right out of Cardinal O'Hara High School, deployed to Iraq in 2003 and was on reconnaissance patrol in an armored personnel carrier when a roadside bomb exploded. He wasn't wounded physically. But after eight months of hypervigilance in Iraq, always ready to run for cover from frequent mortar attacks, Grantland came home to a National Guard assignment in Texas, suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. "I was driving 75 miles-an-hour on I-10 when I saw a couple of guys at the side of the road who looked like they were duct-taping something to the guardrail," said Grantland, now 28 and living in Roxborough.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2012 | By Catherine Laughlin, For The Inquirer
The unkempt man was wearing fatigues, standing in the street and holding a sign that read, "Vietnam vet. Please help. God bless. " The year was 2005 and Barbara Van Dahlen, a licensed clinical psychologist, was driving with her then-9-year-old daughter, who asked why the man was begging in the world's richest country. It was a moment that helped propel Van Dahlen into her official mission, the founding that year of Give an Hour, a national nonprofit providing free mental health services to military personnel and their families affected by the wars in Afghanistan, Iraq, and other post-9/11 conflicts.
NEWS
January 2, 2011 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
The handsome man on the videotape was reliving a very bad memory, and he was doing it amazingly well. His eyes were closed. He was speaking in present tense. His voice was shaking, and he was sniffling. His whole body looked wired. He wanted to cure his post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and he was doing exactly what his new therapist had told him to do. He was mentally putting himself back in the night that most terrified him, one that had haunted him with flashbacks and nightmares for nine years.
NEWS
June 6, 1995 | Daily News wire services contributed to this report
WHAT ABOUT GUMP? A high IQ can do a lot for you, including reducing your risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder, according to Harvard University researchers. After adjustment for socioeconomic status and other factors, the lower a subject's intelligence, the more severe was his PTSD symptoms, a study of 105 Vietnam combat veterans found. "Cognitive variables may affect the ability to cope with trauma, thereby affecting whether a person develops chronic PTSD," Dr. Richard McNally reported in the American Journal of Psychiatry.
NEWS
February 25, 1991 | By Dan Meyers, Inquirer Staff Writer
They are resurfacing now, the Vietnam veterans, those old soldiers who had almost faded away. They are going into the veterans' center in Center City, and psychological clinics in Coatesville and Lyons, Somerset County. They are talking to each other, sometimes after years of uneasy silence, in organized rap sessions or just in phone calls between friends. The battle in the gulf is hitting them hard. As American troops fight the latest war - as a bloody ground war begins, as television records the helicopters and explosions, as reporters do features on body bags - many Vietnam veterans are discovering that they haven't quite purged themselves of the last one. This has affected different vets in different ways.
NEWS
May 8, 1996 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Dramatic new ways to look inside the human brain and capture its workings are starting to yield results in the understanding and treatment of mental illness. In an illustration of how the kind of "photography" known as brain imaging has come of age, scientists yesterday announced new findings that could affect the understanding and treatment of schizophrenia, drug addiction and post-traumatic stress disorder. "For the first time in the history of our field, we can study the living brain," Robert Cancro, a psychiatrist at New York University, said at the annual meeting of the American Psychiatric Association.
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