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NEWS
July 15, 1993 | By Robert F. O'Neill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
"It's like a dream come true to rise through the ranks," the township's new police chief remarked after township Commissioner Stephen Campetti pinned on the badge of office. After 24 years of wearing the uniform and various stripes of a Haverford police officer, Lt. Gary Hoover, 47, was appointed chief of the 63-member department Monday night by a unanimous vote of the Board of Commissioners. "But it doesn't come alone," Hoover told the board and a roomful of smiling friends and well-wishers.
NEWS
June 10, 2004
As Comcast Corp. seeks a hefty tax break to build its new Center City headquarters, Philadelphia officials should secure the cable giant's help with a long-delayed project - launching a public-access cable television station. Community groups pushing to open the powerful medium to amateur broadcasters, filmmakers, and civic groups made that compelling case yesterday before City Council. While Comcast and the other city cable-franchise holder, Urban Cableworks, together pay $500,000 yearly in cable franchise fees toward public-access TV, the city can and does spend it on other expenses.
NEWS
March 8, 1991 | By Frederick Cusick, Inquirer Staff Writer
After objections from neighbors of the Laurels in Chester County, the Brandywine Conservancy has postponed a plan to give thousands of its members access to the 800-acre nature preserve in East Fallowfield and West Marlborough Townships. The Laurels preserve, in the horse country of Chester County, has remained closed to virtually all but those who live around it since the Conservancy acquired the property in 1985. Conservancy officials had proposed broadening access beginning March 1. However, Conservancy spokeswoman Lucinda Laird said yesterday, the nonprofit agency's trustees had decided Monday to postpone action on the proposal.
NEWS
December 11, 2008
As City Council members delve further into Verizon's welcome proposal to expand its pay-TV service to Philadelphia, they can improve the deal for viewers as well as the city's civic life by insisting that Verizon provide more support for citizen-run channels. With a hearing on the 15-year cable franchise negotiated by Mayor Nutter set to resume today, it's likely Council will continue to press Verizon for assurances the company will deliver on its pledge to provide citywide service.
NEWS
February 3, 2009
As the new kid on the block in the cable-TV business in Philadelphia, Verizon Communications Inc. should match the support given by Comcast Corp. to the city's citizen-run television broadcasts. City Council members shouldn't sign off on a 15-year franchise deal that lets Verizon delay and, thus, heavily discount, its contribution toward public-access television. A vote on the cable franchise could come Thursday. Council has a chance to improve the terms of a proposed agreement with Verizon so that the civic interests of the city's residents are better served.
NEWS
April 1, 2002 | By JONATHAN STEIN
IF WE THE PEOPLE do not have access to the channels of communication, what good is freedom of speech? Our present ruling Fathers seem to be ignoring this basic fact. A 19-year-old city ordinance has required the establishment of a public access cable TV system-an electronic speaker's soap box and much more. The refusal of the city administrations since 1983 to implement this law has led to the recent filing of a First Amendment federal court lawsuit against the City by the Philadelphia Community Access Coalition and over a dozen other organizations Two thousand other cities across America have public cable TV channels, including all the largest cities-except Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 10, 1996 | By Stephanie Brenowitz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After weeks of legal maneuvering, the three Democrats on the Township Committee ended public access on cable television's Channel 18, outvoting the two Republicans, who wanted to keep it. Republican committee member Brian Bartlett called the action a "possible attempt to eliminate the public's First Amendment rights. " The Democrats have been trying to eliminate public access on the local cable TV channel since July, expressing concern that someone might want to air offensive programming.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1994 | By Lee Winfrey, INQUIRER TV WRITER
When cable television finally came to Philadelphia in the mid-1980s, part of the plan called for public-access channels that would enable everyday people to put programs on the little screen. A decade later, it still hasn't happened. Everybody agrees on the terms of the deal: The three cable companies serving Philadelphia are supposed to set up and outfit a public-access studio, and the city is supposed to finance its operation. This deal was formally spelled out in the 1985 franchise agreements between the city and the cable companies; the federal 1984 Cable Act said that the cable companies did not have to pay operating costs.
NEWS
March 16, 1997 | By Patricia Smith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After months on the back burner, plans to create a public-access cable channel to serve Berlin Township, Clementon, Lindenwold and Pine Hill are cooking again. The school boards and governing bodies of all four towns and the Lower Camden County Regional District that binds them together have approved spending $1,363 each for equipment to get the cable channel up and running. The channel, which will be based at Pine Hill's John Glenn Elementary School and broadcast on Garden State Cable Co.'s Channel 18, will be a community bulletin board for public service announcements - such as school closings due to inclement weather or school board meeting times.
NEWS
June 7, 2006
Has it been only three years since Mayor Street's administration endorsed launching a public-access cable television station in Philadelphia? And only two decades since the city's cable franchise law established the legal framework for a TV outlet for amateur broadcasters? How the years do roll . . . on . . . by. If public-access TV ever debuts in Philadelphia, its first arts-and-culture offering should be a community theater production of Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot.
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NEWS
May 7, 2016
Given its outsize notoriety, it's worth noting that the cloth-draped chain-link fence corralling Franklin Square for the Philadelphia Chinese Lantern Festival is not exactly the Great Wall. But it has caused great controversy for some good reasons. For all the suddenness with which the fence separated one of William Penn's five original squares from his "greene country towne," it's the result of a gradual accumulation of private prerogatives in public parks. Historic Philadelphia Inc., the nonprofit to which the then-shabby square was turned over a decade ago, has transformed it into a delightful urban oasis partly by virtue of money-making concessions such as a burger stand, an old-fashioned carousel, and a miniature golf course bearing adorable dollhouse versions of Philadelphia monuments.
NEWS
March 29, 2016
For any Philadelphian familiar with the story, it's hard to forget the way Eddie Polec died. The 16-year-old was pummeled to death on the steps of St. Cecilia's Roman Catholic Church in Fox Chase as more than a dozen people, including a nun, called 911, only to be abused, ignored, and misunderstood by dispatchers. One caller held out the phone so that a 911 operator could hear the raging battle among teenagers from Abington and Northeast Philadelphia. But State Rep. Maria Donatucci (D., Phila.)
NEWS
December 10, 2015
ISSUE | EMPLOYMENT Grim outlook Advances in technology are rendering many people unemployable or not employable at their former wages ("Where have all the wages gone?" Sunday). The problem is worsening rapidly, and there are no viable solutions. If the government tries to mandate employment and salary levels, that could drive businesses out of the region, out of the state, or out of the country. Closing the borders could lead to a scenario that would please Ayn Rand. Significant increases in education spending can buy us time, but better education alone will not solve the problem: Many people will simply lack the ability to function in the 21st-century workplace.
NEWS
January 1, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
The system failed mass murderer Bradley Stone's victims and everyone who cared about them. Montgomery County law enforcement officials should show more interest in finding out how. Police say that in just 90 minutes on Dec. 15, Stone killed his ex-wife and five of her relatives during a bloody rampage through Souderton, Lansdale, and Lower Salford. He used a handgun to shoot five of the victims and was also armed with an ax, a machete, and knives. The next day, he was found dead of a drug overdose in the woods near his Pennsburg home.
NEWS
October 19, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
The 25 or so people squeezed into a small television studio deep inside the Tredyffrin Township municipal building were told to relax, to accept not being ready for prime time. "The worst problem I have is, people beat themselves up because they're not Steven Spielberg," Gene Donahue, studio manager and a township employee, said to his class of aspiring producers. "Well, guess what? Steven Spielberg wasn't always Steven Spielberg. " Most students don't have experience shooting with a professional camera.
NEWS
September 24, 2014
ISSUE | TONY AUTH Divisive caricatures At the risk of interrupting the recent hagiography of Tony Auth, I recall his consistently insulting and simplistic caricatures of people of faith and political conservatives ("A witness to Auth's genius," Sept. 21). While he was often insightful and his talent was undeniable, in my opinion he also contributed to our nation's culture of political invective and partisanship. |Andy Horvath, Towson, Md., andyh2247@yahoo.com ISSUE | COMCAST Basic cable offering UPDATE : Comcast reported on Wednesday that, as of July, PCN was moved into its basic cable tier.  What does it say about Comcast's claim to good public service that the only cable station carrying Monday's gubernatorial debate between Gov. Corbett and Tom Wolf was Comcast's channel 186 in its extra-cost service tier?
NEWS
September 5, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The official cloak of secrecy on political contributions made by companies working for the Delaware River Port Authority may soon be a thing of the past. The DRPA's audit committee on Wednesday approved a proposal to restore public access to vendors' political contributions. The full DRPA board will vote on the proposal, made by Pennsylvania Auditor General Eugene DePasquale, later this month. "It's just common sense," DePasquale said Wednesday. "The public has a right to know who's donating to me. " "The idea of not letting this stuff become public is just silly.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
The auction on Tuesday of The Inquirer's parent company will be closed to the press and the public, but the winner and the price should be publicly announced, a Delaware judge ordered Tuesday. "Having considered the parties' submissions, I conclude that the auction should be conducted confidentially and that the auction should be closed to everyone but the participants and the trustee," Delaware Court of Chancery Vice Chancellor Donald F. Parsons Jr. wrote in a letter accompanying his order.
NEWS
July 4, 2013
Mayor Nutter's newest excuse for suppressing public information related to the fatal Market Street building collapse is that a grand jury is investigating the disaster. But the investigation doesn't change the public nature of the records involved. Experts in the field say they were public records before the collapse - and they're public records now. Nutter is blowing a chance to keep his word that his government would be transparent. State law even allows him to grant access to records that fall into a gray area if they illuminate public policy.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
Throughout his 2007 campaign and five-plus years as mayor, Michael Nutter has promoted the virtues of government transparency and open records. At a U.S. Conference of Mayors event in Philadelphia last month, described as an "innovation summit," Nutter patted himself on the back for releasing 47 data sets covering everything from crime to property values. But in the last year, the administration has created new procedural and legal hurdles, with attendant delays, for people seeking access to city records.
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