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NEWS
November 16, 2012 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THE STONE staircase, sandwiched between rowhouses and connecting Water Street and Front Street on an Old City block, seems like any ordinary set of old steps. Residents store their trash cans on them, and fallen leaves line the treads, which dip a bit in the middle from the masses that have climbed up and down them. But neighbors of the Wood Street Steps in Old City say they are a historic treasure, the last remaining steps of about a dozen such staircases William Penn in 1684 ordered be built to ensure public access to the increasingly congested Delaware River waterfront.
NEWS
October 28, 2012
Bob Martin is commissioner of the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection Gov. Christie and I view excellent public access to our ocean beaches, bays, and rivers in New Jersey as a fundamental right for everyone in our state. As millions of residents and visitors know, New Jersey already has wonderful access to our 127 miles of beaches and shoreline. To further enhance access and help redevelop urban waterfronts, the Department of Environmental Protection this month has adopted a public access rule that sets strict requirements but also provides flexibility.
NEWS
October 10, 2012 | By Dan Hardy, Inquirer Staff Writer
A controversial proposal that would deny public access to records of private managers of charter schools has surfaced again in the Pennsylvania legislature after it was rebuffed during the summer. Disagreement over the proposed exemption to the state's Right-to-Know law was one of the reasons that a package of charter law changes submitted in late June was shelved until this fall. The proposal was part of a 53-page amendment inserted into a special education funding bill in an effort to get the charter changes passed along with the budget.
NEWS
October 9, 2012 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A controversial proposal that would deny public access to records of private managers of charter schools has surfaced again in the Pennsylvania legislature after it was rebuffed during the summer. Disagreement over the proposed exemption to the state's Right-to-Know law was one of the reasons that a package of charter law changes submitted in late June was shelved until this fall. The proposal was part of a 53-page amendment inserted into a special education funding bill in an effort to get the charter changes passed along with the budget.
NEWS
September 7, 2012 | By Bob Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mark Headd, a self-taught computer programmer and self-described "civic hacking veteran," has joined the Nutter administration as the city's first "chief data officer," responsible for improving public access to information the city collects. Under an executive order from Mayor Nutter, Headd is to work with city departments and agencies on standards and procedures for releasing city data to the public. It's part of a broader effort to improve transparency and collaborate with private interests - academic centers, commercial ventures, and the news media, among others - that have been struggling for years to get more electronic data from the city.
NEWS
July 13, 2012 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
The handful of students and alumni that gathered in Penn State's student center this morning to watch the release of the Freeh report live were stunned when the channel suddenly switched. While most of campus was still sleepy, the small group was viewing CNN on a large screen, or one of several smaller screens nearby, in anticipation of the 9 a.m. release of the report on the sex abuse scandal that has gripped the school. Most were hoping that the report, part of a seven-month probe by former FBI Director Louis Freeh, would exonerate legendary football coach Joe Paterno.
NEWS
April 25, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
When the sun beats down this summer, beach lovers may have a hard time finding that perfect place on the sand because New Jersey's Department of Environmental Protection is abdicating its responsibility to ensure beach access. The DEP is letting Shore towns, some of which have been hostile to tourists, write their own beach-access plans. The agency is providing so few guidelines that advocates rightly worry that citizens' lawsuits pressing for access could be lost causes. Even if the DEP were to reject a town's beach-access plan, there are no real consequences.
NEWS
April 22, 2012 | Freelance
Last week, media outlets filed motions to unseal the records concerning the arrest of George Zimmerman in connection with the shooting death of Trayvon Martin. Florida has a rich tradition of "sunshine" when it comes to public access to court proceedings, and it seems likely that, sooner than later, the public will see what evidence special prosecutor Angela Corey has that warranted the filing of second-degree murder charges. Thus far, Corey and defense lawyer Mark O'Mara have agreed to limit customary access.
NEWS
April 19, 2012 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
AVALON, N.J. - This Cape May County shore town is where state regulations about precisely how and where the public could reach New Jersey's beaches were undone. Avalon's lawsuit against the state Department of Environmental Protection led a court to strike down rules requiring public-access points every quarter-mile along the shore, and restrooms nearby. The rules were issued during the tenure of Gov. Jon S. Corzine, a Democrat. The administration of Republican Gov. Christie wants to let municipalities write their own public-access plans for the shoreline, subject to state approval.
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