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NEWS
February 25, 2005
Did you decide that you just couldn't miss The Gates in New York? What did you think about the display of saffron flags lining the walkways of Central Park? Not that you need to leave South Jersey to get a look at public art - or to have an opinion about it. Community Voices is looking for essays of about 400 to 700 words on The Gates or any public art in the region. Do you have a favorite, or does one capture your attention even if you don't care for it? Send your essays or ideas to Community Voices, The Inquirer, 53 Haddonfield Rd., Suite 300, Cherry Hill, N.J. 08002.
NEWS
December 27, 1998
With the unveiling of the Frank Rizzo statue on the steps of the Municipal Services Building planned for Jan. 1, this question comes to mind: What other works of art do the public spaces of the city and suburbs need? What person, event or thing would you like to see so honored in your neighborhood? Why? Send essays of 100 words or less by Jan. 11, including a phone number for verification, to Community Voices/Heroes at the addresses listed in the Where to Write box above. Questions?
NEWS
September 3, 1988
Driving across the Ben Franklin Bridge and seeing the city's skyline arrayed before you makes a marvelous introduction to Philadelphia - a promise of urban excitement after an enervating journey through South Jersey's commercial sprawl. As new projects spring up along the waterfront, billboards disappear and Vine Street goes post-modern with sweeping ramps and new landscaping, that impression is bound to get even better. But let's face it, there is one eyesore at the very entrance to the city that acts as an immediate depressant, and nobody to date has done anything about it. That's because Isamu Noguchi's Bolt of Lightning . . . A Memorial to Benjamin Franklin falls into the untouchable realm of art. The 102-foot-high statue, for all the genius, money and good will that went in to its creation, looks like a crumpled piece of metal - less a salute to the great inventor than to the city's oversupply of litter.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1997 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A relief mural spreads 81 feet along the limestone wall of a community center in East Los Angeles. It commemorates the life of a mid-19th-century black woman named Biddy Mason. There's a wagon wheel, symbolizing her trek by wagon train from Texas to Los Angeles, where she won her freedom in a landmark case. There are bonded photos of her freedom papers and of the deed to her homestead, which once stood on the site. There's a midwife's bag, symbolizing her service as a midwife bringing hundreds of babies into the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2011 | By REBECCA ALLEN, The Orange County Register
SEATTLE - Hulking under the Aurora Bridge in Seattle is a 7-ton troll clutching a real Volkswagen Beetle, as if it snagged it off the roadway above. And incidentally, the VW has a California license plate. The statue, made of rebar steel, wire and concrete, is at Troll Way and 36th Street in the funky, artistic neighborhood of Fremont. One of the delights of visiting the Northwest is the vast array of public art. Some of it, like the Fremont Troll, is fun. Some is thought-provoking; some stirs controversy.
NEWS
August 8, 1999
What do we want to leave for future generations? What about our community might inspire a work of public art? How can we improve our public spaces? Over the past year, communities and artists participating in the Fairmount Park Art Association's NewLandMarks program have been grappling with these challenging questions to plan new works of public art for sites throughout Philadelphia. To spread the word about the NewLandMarks program, the art association held community meetings at Free Library branches throughout the city.
NEWS
October 1, 2012 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
Making art that serves the people is a noble goal, yet as both the Bolsheviks and the Mexican muralists discovered in the last century, it's not easy to accomplish. The art of the Russian avant-garde proved to be too radical aesthetically, that of the muralists too extreme politically. With a "light-sculpture" project on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway called Open Air , Rafael Lozano-Hemmer has succeeded in bridging the considerable gap between aesthetic ambition and public taste.
NEWS
May 8, 2002
PICTURED at right is our suggestion for one piece of public art that would be fitting for the outside of the new Phillies and Eagles stadiums. It's by one of Philadelphia's favorite artists, Claes Oldenburg, creator of "Clothespin," that iconic sculpture in Center City. This piece is called "Soft Screw. " As documented by Don Russell in yesterday's Daily News, the public, which is heavily bankrolling the construction of our new $1 billion in stadiums, has been shut out of the selection or approval of the public art that will grace the grounds of those new playing fields.
NEWS
December 12, 2001 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
For its public opening on Sunday, the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts was supposed to have been fitted out with $260,000 worth of public art selected and purchased under the city's One Percent for Art program. However, the process of acquiring the works is months behind schedule, and they probably won't be acquired and installed until the middle of next year. Still, the Kimmel won't be totally artless for its opening. Two small galleries on the center's first tier promenade will be installed with works by faculty, students and alumnae of Moore College of Art and Design.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a shady corner of Rittenhouse Square, as summer eased into fall, Eli Green was racing around the curved benches that encircle Billy , the bronze goat that guards the corner of the park. His mother, Jackie Green, stopped him short with a question: "Eli, how old do you think the goat is?" Without a pause, Eli answered gleefully: "3½!" "He's 100!" Green said. But Eli was resolute: "No! He's 3½ like me. " Kid logic aside, Billy, cast by Philadelphia sculptor Albert Laessle in 1914, does indeed turn 100 this year.
NEWS
February 7, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA More than two years ago, the University of Pennsylvania announced a project to expand the use of portable heart-shocking defibrillators with a new smartphone application. That app is still "a few months" from being ready, according to project director Raina Merchant. But on Thursday, Penn plans to announce a lower-tech approach to promoting automatic external defibrillator (AED) use: a contest to develop "public art" that would call attention to the devices. Or at least some devices.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2014 | BY SHAUN BRADY, For the Daily News
Whether you're there to vent your frustration at City Council, report for the drudgery of jury duty or, worse yet, winding up on the other side of the court system, there are plenty of reasons to be unhappy about visiting City Hall and its neighboring municipal buildings. But, instead of tweeting your complaints the next time you find yourself there, you can now use your smartphone to explore the stunning public artwork in and around the historic building. What was the inspiration behind Robert Indiana's iconic LOVE statue?
NEWS
December 6, 2013 | By A.M. Weaver, For The Inquirer
For a group of young, culturally diverse artists, the epiphany came two years ago. Sharing a workspace in the emerging creative haven of Port Richmond, the five decided pooling their talents and opportunities would pay off faster than individual struggle. Amber Art & Design was born, and already the public-art collective has left an impressive imprint, including the Roots mural honoring the Philly hip-hop neo-soul ensemble presented over the summer at Broad and South Streets.
NEWS
September 6, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
After book lover Valerie S. Porter, 13, died in 1966, her parents saw the Cherry Hill Public Library as the perfect place to keep her memory alive. Their civic-minded family, friends, and supporters raised about $750 to commission a sculpture by George Greenamyer, whose ambitious, abstract piece soared skyward from the bottom of the old library's lower stairwell for 36 years. Installed in 1968, the sculpture was dismantled, boxed, and stored when that building was demolished in 2004.
NEWS
June 13, 2013 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Here, the question is not "Is it art?" In Atlantic City, a place beholden to its vice, seashore, and ancient traditions of commerce and promotion, where everyone's against it before being for it, the question is, Should there even be art? In this latest saga from everyone's favorite seaside resort, locals and the people who would save them are debating the merits of a new $12 million public art program brought to them by the nonprofit Atlantic City Alliance (DO AC)
NEWS
February 15, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Penny Balkin Bach, longtime executive director of the Association for Public Art, has received the 2013 Public Art Dialogue Award for her contributions to the practice of public art in the United States, PAD announced Thursday at its annual meeting in New York City. Bach, 66, has launched a number of influential projects in Philadelphia over the years, including Museum Without Walls, downloadable audio programs tied to three dozen public sculptures on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway and Kelly Drive.
NEWS
December 7, 2012 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia City Council seemed preoccupied Thursday with transportation, processing bills that dealt with skateboards, bikes, and even horses. Also, the members plan to examine U.S. Rep. Bob Brady's idea of using profits from a casino to fund schools and the municipal pension system - a proposal the Nutter administration says may be illegal. Council returned Thursday to legislation shelved two months ago, after a lobbying effort by a group of skateboarders convinced the members that a bill to increase penalties for defacing public art was ill-conceived and vague.
NEWS
October 6, 2012 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
A handful of skaters have pulled off what could be a legislative first in the history of Philadelphia. A few eloquent members of that tribe, using the public comment period at Thursday's City Council meeting, persuaded the members to table a bill that would have increased penalties on skaters who deface public art. The bill was put forward by the Nutter administration after skaters and bikers scuffed up the "glob" of paint that is part of...
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