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NEWS
March 19, 2010
KANSAS CITY, Mo., is on track to close 29 schools due to declining enrollment, and many other school districts are verging on similar action, so it wouldn't be illogical to predict a major overhaul of every phase of America's system of public education. I believe a major reduction in salaries, pensions and other benefits will be necessary to correct a dire situation. Politicians and school administrators can make speeches and promises, but money is the final arbiter. Ephraim Levin, Philadelphia
NEWS
October 15, 2001 | By TIMOTHY POTTS
IF THE EVENTS of the past few weeks have taught us nothing, we have learned that we Americans, including Pennsylvanians, are capable of great acts of heroism and generosity. We have a deep reservoir of compassion when we see innocents suffering through no fault of their own. Even those of us who have no connection to New York City or Washington couldn't wait to donate our blood, sweat, tears and hard-earned money toward their rescue. It's enough to make me believe that we in Pennsylvania really do have the heart and will to rescue our own innocents.
NEWS
October 14, 2010 | By Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writer
Calling him "the education candidate," a public-school advocacy group endorsed Democrat Dan Onorato for governor Wednesday afternoon. Education Voters of Pennsylvania, a nonpartisan, nonprofit group based in Philadelphia, said it preferred Onorato over Republican Tom Corbett because of his support for gradually raising state funding for most school districts according to a formula first approved by the legislature in 2008. Corbett has said he does not support increased funding because of budget crises that the state faces in the next few years.
NEWS
April 2, 2010
AMERICA IS now in the process of dismantling its public-school system. This is the result of indulging in expensive school contracts, lowering standards for teachers and pupils and a funding system that is both archaic and unworkable. All of the foregoing, tolerated by political know-nothings and exacerbated by tens of thousands of drones, has managed to wreck America's infrastructure of learning. What solutions now, disgusting, disingenuous politicians? Ephraim Levin, Philadelphia
NEWS
September 16, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stepping into Philadelphia's school-funding crisis, the Rev. Al Sharpton delivered a fiery address Saturday linking public education to the civil rights movement and promising a return to the city to "take the veil off. " The problem, he said in his keynote speech at the "Higher Education Awareness, Dropout Prevention, and Health Initiative" conference, is "a direct effort to eliminate public education. " He then seized upon a theme often trumpeted by city education activists: "You got money, [Gov.]
NEWS
April 20, 1999 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Nationwide she may be known as the founder of the American Red Cross, but in Burlington County, Clara Barton will be remembered for promoting public education. At Burlington and Crosswicks Streets in Bordentown is a one-room brick schoolhouse, believed to be the first public school in the county, which Barton, then 30, started in 1852 as part of her goal to overcome a bias in the community against "pauper schools. " "Something drew me to the State of New Jersey," Barton wrote in her memoirs.
NEWS
May 15, 2012 | By Lisa Haver
If the School Reform Commission and Chief Recovery Officer Thomas Knudsen have their way, we may witness the end of public education in Philadelphia. A five-year plan proposed by Philadelphia School District officials calls for the overhaul of virtually every element of the system — from finances to academics to central management. These drastic changes suggest to many that the district is intent on expediting the privatization of its schools, despite its promises to stay the traditional route and invest in neighborhoods and communities.
NEWS
May 29, 1994
The most encouraging news about the plan for Philadelphia's public schools announced last week is that, at last, the key players are singing from the same hymnal. When Mayor Rendell, City Council President John Street, and the school board president, Rotan Lee, presented a list of ideas to prevent $29 million in cuts from the school district's budget, they talked more than economics. They talked about addressing the severe credibility problem of the district, the continuing perception that it just sucks up public money to support a "bloated, inefficient and topheavy bureaucracy.
NEWS
March 3, 2003
QUICK RECAP: A few weeks ago, Philadelphia School District CEO Paul Vallas all but canned two principals who had allowed students to get a bit out of hand at their high schools. The crackdown was controversial, but few could debate its symbolic value. High school principals were on notice that a higher standard will be enforced. But a district doesn't survive on symbolism alone. Vallas has now followed up with a bold and substantial plan to overhaul nearly all Philadelphia high schools.
NEWS
September 27, 1989 | BY CAL THOMAS
All 50 governors will meet Wednesday in Charlottesville, Va., for an education summit convened by President Bush. These days it seems that everyone is calling for a restructuring of the public school system, including the National Education Association, whose president, Keith Geiger, recently said "Our experience tells us that our schools need massive, substantive, systemic change. " They do, indeed, and the first change that needs to be made is to take them away from the NEA and the government and convert them into privately run, parent-controlled institutions.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 22, 2016 | By Tim Eller
THE AUDITOR general's recent report about Philadelphia's charter schools fails to include any empirical data, and is nothing more than political grandstanding based on opinion rather than facts. The Keystone Alliance believes that Pennsylvania's nearly 20-year-old charter-school law is in need of revisions; however, the auditor general's claim that it is "simply the worst charter-school law in the United States" is ridiculous. A majority of Pennsylvania's public, brick-and-mortar charter schools serve their intended purpose by providing a safe, high-quality education to students at a cost that's lower than traditional public schools.
NEWS
March 25, 2016
With no resolution to Pennsylvania's record nine-month budget impasse in sight and with public schools contemplating closure, Gov. Wolf has succumbed to Republican obstruction and agreed to a plan that keeps the state in the fast lane toward fiscal instability and educational decline. In the end, he was abandoned by fellow Democrats in the legislature who pleaded with him to accept a fiscally indefensible budget rather than keep trudging toward the end of the fiscal year with no budget at all. Of the many disappointments of this budget, the greatest is its failure to address the state's structural deficit, the stark difference between the state's spending and receipts.
NEWS
February 14, 2016
The headline "School leaders angered by Wolf" (Wednesday) following the governor's unveiling of his 2016-17 budget was misleading. Wolf was elected with the help of educators and parents across the commonwealth with a clear mandate: Reverse the damage done to public education by former Gov. Tom Corbett and the Republican-led General Assembly. Lesser politicians would have used Republican obstructionism as an excuse to give up on that goal. By sticking to his principles and maintaining his promise to voters, he is showing leadership.
NEWS
February 7, 2016
Gov. Wolf is to deliver his 2016-17 budget address Tuesday. Keep in mind, the 2015-16 budget is still not complete, largely because the Republican majority refuses to consider new revenues to restore the funding that was cut for public education and human services during Gov. Tom Corbett's administration. In his 2016-17 proposal, the governor will request additional money for education, on top of the funding he requested and is continuing to negotiate for in this fiscal year. I applaud and agree with his not backing down on his commitment to adequately fund public education.
NEWS
February 5, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas and Kristen A. Graham, STAFF WRITERS
Education activist Susan Gobreski will lead the city's charge in setting up community schools throughout Philadelphia, Mayor Kenney announced Wednesday. Gobreski, who most recently was executive director of the advocacy group Education Voters of Pennsylvania, was appointed community schools director. "Susan's long-standing commitment to improving our city's schools, coupled with her expertise in community engagement, made her an obvious choice for this role," Kenney said in a statement.
NEWS
December 21, 2015
ISSUE | ED RENDELL What about Paris? In the wake of 196 countries acknowledging that we need to move away from fossil fuels as a source of energy, it is a bitter pill to read Ed Rendell praising the spoils of fracking in the Marcellus region ("Time is right to develop Phila. energy, container hub," Monday). The climate agreement reached in Paris on Dec. 12 is a much-needed landmark on the road to a sustainable future, but there is much work to be done, and we cannot afford to backslide.
NEWS
October 22, 2015
ISSUE | CAMPAIGN 2015 Voters need to hear candidates' views When one political party's slate of candidates refuses to participate in public debates, it feels like a threat to democracy. Nearly 100 years ago, the League of Women Voters sought to provide accurate, unbiased, nonpartisan information for voters in local, state, and national elections. This year, the League of Women Voters of Haverford Township is unable to offer a forum for township candidates running for commissioner in five of our nine wards.
NEWS
August 14, 2015 | BY DERRICK BOYD, ANDREA MOSELLE & DAVID MOSENKIS, POWER Education Strategy Team
GOV. TOM WOLF won election by campaigning strongly on his commitment to significantly increase education funding and to make fundamental changes in the way those funds are distributed to the 500 school districts across Pennsylvania. Soon after taking office, he proposed a comprehensive plan for increasing the percentage of education funding which comes from the commonwealth, while shifting the source of funds away from the heavy property-tax burden which many Pennsylvania communities currently shoulder.
NEWS
July 3, 2015
AS EXPECTED, Gov. Wolf this week vetoed the $30.2 billion budget passed by legislative Republicans, saying that it was filled with "gimmicks . . . smoke and mirrors and a lot of kick the can down the road. " That is a long string of clichés, but the governor was right. The Republican budget balanced on paper, but did so by shortchanging public education and pillaging various state funds that were supposed to be dedicated to such things as school construction and child-welfare payments.
NEWS
June 25, 2015
PHILLY, MEET Scott Wagner. He's a 59-year old first-term Republican state senator from (Gov. Wolf's home) York County who's loathed by unions, loved by conservatives and a growing force in the GOP Legislature. He wants to cut government costs, government pensions, taxes and regulations. He's a self-described rough-edged "garbage man who never graduated college. " But he's also a wealthy biz-guy - owns trucking and trash firms - who made Pennsylvania political history.
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