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Public Enemy

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1990 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Rap superstars Public Enemy will perform in Philadelphia this Sunday at Studio West, 59th and Market streets, show co-promoter (and former WDAS-FM disc jockey) Bilaaly Bee said yesterday. The rap group had planned to appear here several weeks ago as a benefit for Kyle Sampson, a fellow Muslim and Democratic candidate for the 188th District seat in the state House. But because of the group's controversial image, "Lincoln University reneged on a verbal agreement to house the show, then two big clubs in the area refused to let us hold the show, with one saying they just don't like the group's lyrics," Sampson said.
NEWS
May 8, 1998 | by Tonya Pendleton, Daily News Staff Writer
While the soundtrack for "He Got Game" is the music for the Spike Lee film of the same name, it's also the first Public Enemy disc in four years. And with the original lineup intact, including once-deposed member Professor Griff and the Bomb Squad production team that created several classic P.E. albums, it presented an intriguing challenge. The once-mighty P.E. would have to create songs that made sense for the film and do so under the weight of heavy expectations. With seminal '80s rap releases like "It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back" and "Fear of a Black Planet," Public Enemy was in the unenviable position of having to compete against their previous works in a rap market that has changed dramatically since their heyday.
NEWS
October 1, 1991 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Music Critic
Chuck D., Public Enemy's primary rapper and one of the most strident voices in pop music, delivers his missives with the controlled fury of a martial-arts master. His thick bullhorn of a voice expresses disdain and dissatisfaction in tones that are deceptively conversational. He can summon rage in the blink of an eye, provoke his audience without becoming even mildly aggravated. His scowling impatience with the status quo makes every phrase an urgent communication. And like any fighter, Chuck D. is most effective when he has a clear opponent.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1989 | By David Browne, New York Daily News
If Public Enemy has indeed disbanded in light of the controversy over group member Professor Griff's anti-Semitic remarks, an apt summary of their work is provided by "Fight the Power Live," their first home-video release (CMV Enterprises, $19.95). Fifty-five crazed minutes of concert footage, music videos and Flavor Flav antics, the video is as purposefully controversial as the group itself. Public Enemy often seemed less a band than an agenda, and the emphasis here is as much on sermonizing as on the music.
NEWS
June 8, 2009 | By Sam Adams FOR THE INQUIRER
They may be New Yorkers for five nights a week, but the Roots still know how to make their hometown feel loved. Saturday's Roots Picnic at Festival Pier was a sprawling, sweaty thank-you gift to the city they call Illadelph. The Roots themselves opened the all-day affair with a short set before ceding the stage to a wide swath of friends and fellow travelers, including Public Enemy, TV on the Radio, Asher Roth, and Santigold, not to mention New Kids on the Block's Donnie Wahlberg and Jordan Knight, who stopped by on their way to a show in Camden.
NEWS
June 27, 1989 | By Lucinda Fleeson, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributing to this report were Inquirer staff writer Tom Moon, the Associated Press, United Press International, the New York Daily News and Reuters
The popular rap group Public Enemy is apparently breaking up. On MTV's Week in Rock news program this weekend, leader Chuck D. said he was calling a halt to the group due to pressure that came from his record company, CBS Records, and his management, Rush Productions. He said he'd been called on to dismiss Public Enemy's "Minister of Information," Professor Griff, for a series of anti-Semitic statements made in recent interviews. "The group is over," Chuck D. told MTV's Kurt Loder, intimating that he would have rather handled the situation internally.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1990 | By David Hinckley, New York Daily News
With 1 million copies of its "Fear of a Black Planet" album having been shipped in recent weeks, Public Enemy has settled down to prepare for a tour starting in July. With PE, though, things are never as calm as they seem. Harry Allen, PE "director of enemy relations," has sent copies to journalists of "The Cress Theory of Color-Confrontation. " This 1970 paper by psychologist Frances Cress Welsing argues that white racism and its evil effects are rooted in whites' sense of inferiority over their lack of color and subsequent attempts to compensate by degrading those who have it. The writings of Welsing and Neely Fuller Jr., who argues that white racism is a worldwide system, "should be seen as some of the inspiration for 'Fear of a Black Planet,' " Allen says.
NEWS
August 10, 1989 | By Peter Landry, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributing to this report were the Associated Press and Reuters
Somehow we were just waiting for this one. In the Good-Gigs-Are-Hard-to- Come-By-So-Why-Should-We-Kiss-Off-Ours world of popular music, members of the recently disbanded rap group Public Enemy announced yesterday that they'd reunite and were planning a new album before the end of the year. "After having taken time out for reorganization, Public Enemy is back in action," began an eight-paragraph, state-of-the-band statement from leader Chuck D. "The show must go on. Brace yourselves for 1990.
NEWS
September 18, 2013
DENNIS Williams seemed rather irritated that Public Enemy entertained the crowd at the city's Made in America concert, claiming that it was a "slap in the face of all Philadelphians. " Yes, Public Enemy did display a "Free Mumia" banner at the concert, and they also called for justice for Trayvon Martin. Fortunately, they have a right to do so: It's called "freedom of speech. " Public Enemy has always been political and outspoken, and I commend them for it! Let me point out that, at the concert, Public Enemy also called out to Gov. Corbett to stop shortchanging Philadelphia schools, and pledged to donate a portion of their Made in America earnings to aid Philadelphia public schools, and even challenged other MIA artists to do so as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1994 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Rap is in trouble. In just a few years, it's gone from being "the black CNN," as Public Enemy's Chuck D. once called it, to being the Cartoon Channel, full of brutish gangsta poseurs and dim bulbs who cling to their old-school musical tricks like a security blanket. After all, how many ways are there to combine "bitch," "hoe" and "Uzi" into insightful poetry? In rides Public Enemy to save the day. The Long Island rap collective, dormant for three years, has always required an adversary, and there's none better right now than rap itself.
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NEWS
September 18, 2013
DENNIS Williams seemed rather irritated that Public Enemy entertained the crowd at the city's Made in America concert, claiming that it was a "slap in the face of all Philadelphians. " Yes, Public Enemy did display a "Free Mumia" banner at the concert, and they also called for justice for Trayvon Martin. Fortunately, they have a right to do so: It's called "freedom of speech. " Public Enemy has always been political and outspoken, and I commend them for it! Let me point out that, at the concert, Public Enemy also called out to Gov. Corbett to stop shortchanging Philadelphia schools, and pledged to donate a portion of their Made in America earnings to aid Philadelphia public schools, and even challenged other MIA artists to do so as well.
NEWS
September 7, 2013
Get off our Parkway lawn One of the true jewels of Philadelphia was held prisoner this past holiday weekend. An ugly cage was put around the Parkway leading up to the Art Museum. Made in America kept thousands of tourists and recreational users from enjoying the Parkway. Next year, the concert should be held in a facility such as the Linc, Franklin Field, or Citizens Bank Park. If none of those sites are available, put the concert in a big, empty field. Why does it need to be near the museum?
NEWS
September 2, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former Masterman School guidance counselor gained rock-star status Saturday when she was invited onto a Made in America festival stage to make a pitch for counselors laid off from the Philadelphia School District. Taking the mike from Flavor Flav, Heather Marcus urged the crowd watching Public Enemy to contact elected officials to tell them to "stop playing games and stand up for students. " "Do you think every child in Philadelphia deserves to have a certified school counselor?"
NEWS
September 2, 2013 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
With Day One a virtual sellout and few problems reported, the Budweiser Made in America festival roared out of the gate at noon Saturday and did not slow down through 10 hours of top musical performances. The two-day event - the brainchild of hip-hop impresario Jay Z - offered a jolt to the Labor Day weekend and a boost in national exposure to Philadelphia for a second year, taking place on the Parkway under a mostly clear, sunny sky. With bigger crowds expected (60,000 tickets available per day vs. 50,000 in 2012)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2012 | By Brian G. Howard, For The Inquirer
It's been 25 years since Public Enemy dropped its stunning 1987 debut, Yo! Bum Rush the Show . But to listen to the godfathers of hard-driving sociopolitical hip-hop today, you'd think they were just getting started. On two new albums, Most of My Heroes Still Don't Appear on No Stamp and The Evil Empire of Everything (both released digitally this year and now available on CD), booming, stentorian-voiced MC Chuck D and infinite jester/hype man Flavor Flav sound as invigorated as on their most vital early recordings.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2012 | By Dan Gross
MORNING HOST Bill Anderson , of 900 WURD-AM, is expected to announce on his Wednesday "Wake Up With Bill" show that Friday will be his last day at the station. Anderson, a former Daily News Sexy Single, has told friends he will be dabbling in television in the near future. He appears regularly on Fox 29's "Good Day" but denies that's where he's going. "I wish I could say more, but I really can't," Anderson said Tuesday. "The decision to leave was mine, and the station has been great about supporting my decision.
SPORTS
June 25, 2012
Two days before the Miami Heat won an NBA championship, with LeBron James forging a triple-double to complete one of the greatest performances in league playoff history, I was sitting in a chair getting a haircut. Just to make idle chatter, my stylist, perhaps recognizing the dearth of substantive sports conversation in the summer months when the Phillies are slogging along in last place, asked me what I was going to talk about that day on my radio show. "Well," I replied, "there's always LeBron.
NEWS
November 12, 2011
In a big city with crime, corruption, and SEPTA, a surplus of furry little woodland critters isn't a natural public policy priority. Darrell Clarke has been doing his best to change that. The North Philadelphia councilman is the city's foremost hawk on raccoons - though, surprisingly, not its only one. Councilwoman Donna Reed Miller has also noticed the masked varmints' vaguely menacing aspect: "I think they look terrible when you see them running down the street with their backs all hunched.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2011 | BY GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
LEONARDO DICAPRIO is one of more than 30 actors to play J. Edgar Hoover, whose shrouded life makes him a tough target for actors. The list includes Bob Hoskins, Jack Warden, Ned Beatty, and Treat Williams. Ernest Borgnine played him twice. So did Broderick Crawford, once on "Saturday Night Live. " Over time, Hoover portrayals have become less reverential - the propaganda of "The FBI Story" (1959) gave way to the gossipy Hoover vs. Kennedy soap opera of several TV miniseries in the 1970s and '80s.
NEWS
August 21, 2011 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's a week and a half before WRNB DJ Lady B's celebrity-studded 30th-anniversary party, and she hasn't heard from rapper-turned-actor Will Smith yet. Will her childhood friend record a promo video in her honor? Maybe Smith will perform one of his megahits at Sunday night's concert at the Dell Music Center. B is not sure what's up with Smith, and she's getting antsy. She has called Smith's management team and even his mom. No answer. Wait a minute - she just found out Smith is going to call her show in a few minutes.
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