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NEWS
June 10, 1993 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
While it was windy in most of Radnor Township Sunday, the protected rose garden at the Chanticleer Foundation was a haven of calm and warmth. With its white, pink and red roses banked along a garden wall near the pool, the sheltered garden provided the perfect setting for a garden party. About 150 guests attended the late afternoon affair to celebrate the opening of Chanticleer as a public garden. On Church Road just west of Conestoga Road, Chanticleer was founded in the late 1970s by the late Adolph Rosengarten Jr. The 30-acre estate is identifiable for its twin roosters crowing atop pillars before a semicircular entrance that has pinkish-white roses blooming throughout most of the summer.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Do not get Allen Lacy going on the subject of Bradford pear trees or forsythia bushes unless you want to get an earful. He considers them common and overplanted, and you won't find a single one in the Linwood Arboretum in Linwood, N.J., which Lacy created five years ago and somehow manages to keep going with his septuagenarian wife, Hella, a half-dozen volunteers, a surfeit of optimism, and hardly any money. Lacy calls it "the smallest arboretum in the world," but its wish list may be the largest.
NEWS
April 4, 2013 | By Mari A. Schaefer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It may still be cold enough to feel like winter but a sure sign that spring has arrived is upon us. Chanticleer Gardens has opened for the season. From now through November 3, the public garden located on the Main Line will be open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. from Wednesday through Sunday. On Fridays during the summer, visitors can stay until 8 p.m. The garden, set on 47 acres in Wayne, will mark two special occasions in 2013. Its will celebrate its 20th year as a public garden and the centennial as the Rosengarten estate.
NEWS
August 25, 1993 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Helene diSciullo, alas, can never find time to work in her garden because she's always working in someone else's. It's an occupational hazard for the soft-spoken landscape designer, especially at this time of year. But there's one garden she gladly dallies in, a lush, colorful little plot on the corner of the borough's busiest intersection. It is the borough green. DiSciullo designed it, did much of the planting, and now tends it like a newborn. "It was my most challenging job," she said Monday, strolling along one of the walkways in the green.
NEWS
August 14, 2005 | By Susan Weidener INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
At heart, Fred Roberts is just a farmer whose passion in life is growing vegetables, including every variety of potato imaginable. He grew up on a dairy farm in Connecticut - a good place to come from, considering that for the last 21 years, Roberts, director of Longwood Gardens, has tended one of the world's horticultural gems. It is under his stewardship that Pierre S. du Pont's famed garden in Kennett Square will celebrate its 100th year beginning in January. About 750,000 people visited Longwood last year.
NEWS
March 31, 2002 | By Jake Wagman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Don't discard those daffodils, and hang on to those hyacinths. Keeping with the spirit of the holidays and the season, the township's Environmental Commission is seeking to collect the potted flowers people receive - and generally throw away - to start a public garden. "We are trying to collect spring flowers, the kind that mom gets on Mother's Day and Easter," said Paul Greger, who is coordinating the program for the township. "In a way, it's a recycling program. " Through the township's Youth Services department, scout troops and other community groups will be recruited to plant the bulbs on a 1 1/2-acre section of Washington Lake Park, Greger said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
The garden's "off-season" used to be a time to rest and daydream about next year's triumphs, but for professional gardeners and many an amateur, that's the fantasy now. "The off-season used to be a nice time to decompress, but I'm actually busier then. It's more restful to go out and weed," says Joe Henderson, one of six full-time horticulturists at Chanticleer, the public garden in Wayne, who are expected to take on a creative project every winter. This keeps everyone "focused and busy," to put it mildly, and allows for "time to dream about future designs," according to Chanticleer's executive director R. William Thomas.
NEWS
January 25, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the first things Jeff Downing tells you about himself is this: "I'm not a plant guy. " Which is a surprise, and not entirely true. Downing is the new executive director of the Mount Cuba Center, the 600-acre public garden just outside Wilmington that's dedicated to native plants in the Mid-Atlantic region. And while he may not be a trained horticulturist, as many of his peers are, he comes to Mount Cuba after 13 years at the New York Botanical Garden, the last five as vice president for education.
NEWS
June 13, 2002 | By Chris Gray and Dan Hardy INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Gennaro D'Aurizio's secret world, a three-acre verdant vegetable garden in Chester he carefully tended since 1956, lay hidden from the rest of Vauclain Street by a seven-foot wall of bushes. But the privacy didn't appease the 83-year-old Italian immigrant's sons, who begged him to stop returning to his old Sun Village neighborhood, a decaying block on the eastern side of the city. Not safe, they said. Just one more year, D'Aurizio replied. So every morning at around 7, the hobbyist would travel from Woodlyn to work for a few hours on his rows of peas and cabbages, tomatoes and eggplants.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
An ancient, highly porous form of charcoal is being touted as a godsend for soil health and fertility - transforming farms, home gardens, and urban and suburban landscapes. It might even combat climate change. Any wonder they're calling biochar a "miracle product"? "It's important not to promise too much, but this is mind-popping stuff," says Dale Hendricks, owner of Green Light Plants, a wholesale organic nursery in Landenberg, Chester County, who talks up biochar to public gardens and local garden clubs, and cooks his own in barrels, kilns, and a wood stove.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
An ancient, highly porous form of charcoal is being touted as a godsend for soil health and fertility - transforming farms, home gardens, and urban and suburban landscapes. It might even combat climate change. Any wonder they're calling biochar a "miracle product"? "It's important not to promise too much, but this is mind-popping stuff," says Dale Hendricks, owner of Green Light Plants, a wholesale organic nursery in Landenberg, Chester County, who talks up biochar to public gardens and local garden clubs, and cooks his own in barrels, kilns, and a wood stove.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Do not get Allen Lacy going on the subject of Bradford pear trees or forsythia bushes unless you want to get an earful. He considers them common and overplanted, and you won't find a single one in the Linwood Arboretum in Linwood, N.J., which Lacy created five years ago and somehow manages to keep going with his septuagenarian wife, Hella, a half-dozen volunteers, a surfeit of optimism, and hardly any money. Lacy calls it "the smallest arboretum in the world," but its wish list may be the largest.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
William H. Frederick Jr., known as Bill, is 88 now, a little stooped and hard of hearing, a far hike down the road from his 1948 Swarthmore College graduation. But this accomplished garden designer, nurseryman, and author remains an icon in plant circles. Since the 1960s, he has shared his expertise and extraordinary 17-acre garden outside Wilmington with 33 interns and thousands of professional gardeners, landscape architects, and students from around the world. Now, there's a good deed that cannot trump Frederick's half-century of knowledge-sharing, but certainly tops it off nicely: an $800,000 gift to Scott Arboretum, which covers 300 acres of Swarthmore's 450-acre campus.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
'Kale in the serpentine" sounds like the title of a whodunit, but there's no mystery here - just something new and fun that awaits visitors to Chanticleer, the public garden in Wayne that likes to change things up every year. Other Philadelphia-area gardens have added stuff this spring, too, from new tree houses and replenished rose gardens to "steps-free" walkways and giant bug sculptures. But "kale in the serpentine" definitely stands out. First, the serpentine. It's a hillside garden planted every spring with snaking swaths of cool and colorful crops like wheat, tobacco, barley, cotton, flax, sunflowers, or sorghum.
NEWS
April 4, 2013 | By Mari A. Schaefer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It may still be cold enough to feel like winter but a sure sign that spring has arrived is upon us. Chanticleer Gardens has opened for the season. From now through November 3, the public garden located on the Main Line will be open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. from Wednesday through Sunday. On Fridays during the summer, visitors can stay until 8 p.m. The garden, set on 47 acres in Wayne, will mark two special occasions in 2013. Its will celebrate its 20th year as a public garden and the centennial as the Rosengarten estate.
NEWS
January 25, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the first things Jeff Downing tells you about himself is this: "I'm not a plant guy. " Which is a surprise, and not entirely true. Downing is the new executive director of the Mount Cuba Center, the 600-acre public garden just outside Wilmington that's dedicated to native plants in the Mid-Atlantic region. And while he may not be a trained horticulturist, as many of his peers are, he comes to Mount Cuba after 13 years at the New York Botanical Garden, the last five as vice president for education.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
After her husband died suddenly at age 48, Mandy Swope's brain wouldn't stop. The tape loop went like this: "John's dead. John's dead. " Three and a half years later, Swope, now 48 herself and still living in the couple's Malvern home with their 14-year-old daughter, has finally emerged from the deep grief that once paralyzed her emotions. Swope's recovery is due in part to the passage of time and a compassionate therapist. Another part involves flowers - and the friendship of fellow gardeners.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
The garden's "off-season" used to be a time to rest and daydream about next year's triumphs, but for professional gardeners and many an amateur, that's the fantasy now. "The off-season used to be a nice time to decompress, but I'm actually busier then. It's more restful to go out and weed," says Joe Henderson, one of six full-time horticulturists at Chanticleer, the public garden in Wayne, who are expected to take on a creative project every winter. This keeps everyone "focused and busy," to put it mildly, and allows for "time to dream about future designs," according to Chanticleer's executive director R. William Thomas.
NEWS
April 20, 2012 | Eva Mondheim
Dump old plastic containers. Many garden centers now have recycling bins where you can drop off or pick up used plastic flower pots and trays. Either way, you're keeping plastic out of landfills. Box stores like Lowe's and garden centers like Primex in Glenside offer this service. For more recycling ideas for the garden, go to http://mypennfuture.org/siteMessageViewer?em_id=40561.0 Try growing hops. The plants, which grow from rhizomes, shoot up about 20 feet a year and the flowers smell wonderfully sweet.
NEWS
January 20, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eavesdrop in a garden, and what do you hear? Not a lot of narrative. Mostly exclamations over the beauty of something and curiosity about what it is, in and around the absorbing silence. So it is that Paul W. Meyer has "written" a new book about the Morris Arboretum in Chestnut Hill with no text, just photographs, most taken over the last eight years. Its title is a straightforward Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania Through the Lens of Paul W. Meyer. "It's meant to be a walk through the garden," explains Meyer, 59, a self-taught shutterbug who has worked at Morris for almost 36 years, the last 21 as director.
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