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NEWS
May 11, 2011
By Robert Field, professor of law and public health at Drexel University:   Do you know anyone who died of polio or from a cup of water? If you live in America, probably not. But in many countries, such tragedies are still common. We in the United States owe our good fortune to the work of public health. It protects our health and well-being on a national scale. Public health is different from health care. The latter is the range of services we receive from doctors, nurses, and others.
NEWS
February 4, 1991 | By Mary Jane Fine, Inquirer Staff Writer
In November 1989, the voters of Montgomery County overwhelmingly voted to create a county health department - 52,734 in favor, 31,646 opposed. Rosellen Burcin was one of the naysayers. Burcin is the local health officer for Lansdale Borough - and far from the only opposition voice among her counterparts. "It's a touchy subject," she says of the long-standing controversy over local health monitoring versus countywide monitoring. "The populace is perceiving that we (health officers)
NEWS
November 25, 2002 | By Marian Uhlman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At a time of growing public-health concerns - bioterrorism, West Nile disease, obesity - programs to develop experts to deal with such problems are sprouting in the Philadelphia region - and across the nation. These new programs train people for jobs in health departments, health systems, drug firms, and community health groups. There are now at least six graduate-level public-health programs in Southeastern Pennsylvania and one in South Jersey. Four have been launched in just the last year.
NEWS
May 15, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
When Gina McCarthy started her professional life, she was a public health worker in community health centers. She still considers herself a public health worker, although her job today - administrator for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency - is vastly different. What that early community work showed, McCarthy recently told a group of digital health professionals meeting in Philadelphia, was the strong connection between environmental health and public health. "I was seeing people come in day in and day out with asthma, or the elderly who couldn't breathe," she said.
NEWS
May 13, 2010 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delaware County residents would benefit from leadership in and coordination of public health systems, according to a study discussed Wednesday night at a rare nighttime County Council meeting. The study also identified gaps in coverage that indicate room for improvement in such areas as outreach for smoking and alcohol consumption, bicycle helmet use, Lyme disease, and sexually transmitted diseases. About 50 people attended the meeting with the council and researchers. In June 2008, the county contracted with Johns Hopkins University's Bloomberg School of Public Health to survey its public health services and identify needs.
NEWS
August 19, 2002 | By Marian Uhlman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia's only school of public health has a new dean. Marla Gold, an infectious disease specialist, stepped into the job this month at Drexel University. She replaces Robert O. Valdez, who resigned to become a professor in Drexel's business school, according to university officials. Gold didn't need to move far to become dean. Her new digs at 1505 Race St. are only a block from her AIDS/HIV clinic on Vine Street, where she and colleagues put together the largest practice of its kind in Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 4, 1988
They threw everything but rotten tomatoes at Health Commissioner Maurice C. Clifford when he appeared before City Council late last month. The bad blood might surprise most folks since Dr. Clifford keeps an exceedingly low profile in a city that ranks right up there with the worst in the nation in terms of infant mortality, teen pregnancy and AIDS. In a nutshell, that's part of the problem: Dr. Clifford is a gentlemanly physician who, at 67, gives the impression he's stepping back from the fray, at a time when the city's health problems show no sign of slackening.
NEWS
March 25, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Robert M. Patterson, 63, of Center City, a professor of public health at Temple University who researched environmental health hazards, died of pancreatic cancer March 14 at home. During his career, Dr. Patterson was involved in 35 research projects, including setting guidelines for workplace exposure to chemical substances, studying the exposure of commuters to motor-vehicle pollutants, and researching the electrical conductivity of power-line workers' boots. He helped Philadelphia Air Management Services develop asbestos regulation and served on Philadelphia's Air Pollution Control Board.
NEWS
August 29, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
James McAnaney, 55, of Northeast Philadelphia, an investigator for agencies tracking AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases who devoted half his life to public health, died Thursday of non-Hodgkins lymphoma at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Mr. McAnaney began his career in New York as a U.S. Centers for Disease Control representative in the early 1980s. "He canvassed neighborhoods and knocked on doors in Brooklyn, investigating sexually transmitted diseases," said his wife of 16 years, Suzy Drinan.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 10, 2016 | By Rita Giordano, Staff Writer
New regulations aimed at curtailing the high number of tobacco retailers in low-income neighborhoods, particularly those near schools, were approved Thursday night by the Philadelphia Board of Health. The regulations, designed to reduce tobacco use and discourage children from picking up the habit, include: Suspending tobacco sales permits - for 12 months - to retailers who are cited three times in two years for selling to minors. (In 2015, 23 percent of the city's tobacco retailers sold to youth, according to department data.)
NEWS
August 26, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
As Philadelphia prepares for the January launch of its tax on sweetened beverages, a new study found low-income residents in Berkeley, Calif., home of the nation's first "soda tax," are not just consuming fewer sugary drinks. They are making a healthy substitution - water. The study by University of California, Berkeley researchers found sugary drink consumption in low-income neighborhoods fell by 21 percent five months after the tax went into effect, while water consumption rose by 63 percent.
NEWS
August 16, 2016 | By Stephanie Farr, Staff Writer
A 59-year-old North Philadelphia man who died Sunday was the city's third heat-related fatality this weekend and the seventh of the summer, according to the city's Department of Public Health. The man, whose identity and address were not released, died from the heat and from complications related to congestive heart failure and diabetes, said Jeff Moran, a spokesman for the city's Department of Public Health. Two other people, an 82-year-old Port Richmond woman and a 67-year-old woman from Brewerytown, died on Saturday of heat-related complications and cardiovascular disease, the Department of Public Health said.
NEWS
August 15, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
So maybe you kept up with the weeds in the spring. But now? How on earth did they get to be so numerous, and so big? If you're thinking that it might be time for an herbicide, but you're confused about whether that's safe, you have plenty of company. The most commonly used herbicide, glyphosate - a major ingredient in many products, perhaps most notably Monsanto's RoundUp - has been the subject of debate for years. The industry says it is safe. Critics, pointing out that residues are found in some of our food, warn of potential health effects and environmental woes, including the development of "superweeds" that are resistant to it, necessitating stronger chemicals.
NEWS
July 3, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
Ten days ago, with President Obama's signing of new chemical safety legislation, the last remaining environmental legislation of the 1970s that had not been updated got a makeover. It had been a long time coming. More than 80,000 chemicals are in common use, and previously the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency could call for safety testing only after evidence that there was a potential danger. As a result, the EPA has been able to require testing on only about 200 chemicals.
NEWS
June 23, 2016
"Nearly 250 years ago, the eyes of the world were on Philadelphia and the birth of American democracy. On Thursday, Philadelphia will again make history by becoming the second U.S. city, and the largest, to pass a tax on soft drinks. " - City Council leaders Darrell L. Clarke, Bobby Henon, Blondell Reynolds Brown, and Bill Greenlee, The Inquirer, June 14 By Mark Randall (with obvious help from Thos. Jefferson) When in the Course of human events it becomes necessary for one people to dispense with the sugary brands that have consumed them, and that they have consumed, and then resume among the streets of the city that separate and unequal station to which the Laws of Economics and City Council have doomed them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the reasons they should be glad of this.
NEWS
June 18, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, Staff Writer
The public health community far and wide reacted instantly and enthusiastically to Philadelphia City Council's final vote Thursday to tax sweetened beverages. It also largely avoided commenting on one big part of the new tax: the inclusion of artificially sweetened drinks. Some also noted an irony: The mayor who intentionally did not emphasize public health in campaigning for the tax could end up causing a major impact on his city's well-being. And his example will likely resonate in other American cities, experts predicted.
NEWS
June 1, 2016
ISSUE | AIR POLLUTION Ozone endangers children with asthma Ground-level ozone is a powerful pollutant that can trigger dangerous health consequences, including asthma attacks and heart attacks ("Linking environmental, public health," May 15). Doctors see patients' physical distress when ozone levels are high. My particular concern is the effect of air pollution on uniquely vulnerable members of our population: children with asthma. The health community can play a critical role in educating decision-makers about the need for clean-air safeguards to protect public health.
NEWS
May 15, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
When Gina McCarthy started her professional life, she was a public health worker in community health centers. She still considers herself a public health worker, although her job today - administrator for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency - is vastly different. What that early community work showed, McCarthy recently told a group of digital health professionals meeting in Philadelphia, was the strong connection between environmental health and public health. "I was seeing people come in day in and day out with asthma, or the elderly who couldn't breathe," she said.
NEWS
May 11, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, Staff Writer
A new public health concept - combining medical care with recreation and education - came to brick-and-mortar life with Monday's opening of the South Philadelphia Community Health and Literacy Center. Parents can take their kids to the third-floor pediatric clinic and then visit the primary-care center a floor down for their own health needs. A branch library will soon open at ground level, with a special section where patients can learn more about their health issues. The new recreation center will open next month, providing exercise as a foundation for healthy living.
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