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NEWS
July 30, 2015 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
As summers go, this one has been fairly benign, with only two short heat waves. Based on the forecast, the wave we're in now could end up being the longest of the season, with daily temperatures forecast to hit 90 or better into early next week. Wednesday would be the worst of it, with temperatures heading into the mid-90s and heat indexes in triple figures. But the National Weather Service has not hoisted the heat warning flags yet, and after Wednesday, the forecast highs back off a couple of degrees.
NEWS
July 20, 2015 | By Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia police said Saturday that a man was being questioned by investigators as a person of interest in connection with the death of a recent Drexel University graduate. Jasmine Wright, 27, was strangled inside her West Philadelphia apartment last week, police said. After she was not heard from, Wright's family asked police to check the apartment. Police found no signs of forced entry when they entered the unit Thursday and discovered her body. Evidence has led investigators to believe that Wright may have known her assailant.
NEWS
July 17, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
"LIKE A PUNCH in the gut. " That's how Keith Hooks said he felt upon hearing that Jasmine Wright, 27, his kind and quiet neighbor, had been found brutally murdered in her apartment. "It's just sick," Hooks, 53, said last night, mere feet from the slain Drexel University grad's front door, directly beside his own. "She was professional and sweet," Hooks said. "She just went about her business and didn't bother anybody. "And she certainly didn't deserve this. " Wright's body was found about 2:30 p.m. inside her third-floor apartment on 50th Street near Locust in West Philly, Homicide Capt.
NEWS
June 29, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
As a pediatrician at the Cobbs Creek Primary Care Center at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Roy Wade Jr. employs the usual tools of his trade, such as thermometer, tongue depressor, and stethoscope. But as a researcher, he is working to develop a different kind of tool kit: a questionnaire to help pediatricians figure out which of their young patients are at greatest risk to develop early cognitive, emotional, and health problems. Wade's work builds on the landmark 1998 ACE (Adverse Childhood Experiences)
BUSINESS
April 4, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than a decade ago, city health inspectors would see occasional mouse droppings at Philadelphia International Airport, black residue and slime inside ice machines, and eggs and other cold foods kept at temperatures too warm. In 2011, the airport approved the hiring of two former city health inspectors, and the results have been dramatic. Violations for risk factors known to cause food-borne illness have significantly declined. Today, the airport's 27 eat-in restaurants have a better average than the citywide numbers for 5,000 non-airport eat-in restaurants.
NEWS
February 10, 2015 | BY JOEL MATHIS & BEN BOYCHUK, Tribune News Service
    SUDDENLY, the debate over vaccines has gone mainstream. Amid a measles breakout - a disease that doctors believed had been eradicated a decade ago - a pair of Republican politicians came under fire for seemingly anti-vaccination comments. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie said that vaccinations should largely be left to parents, while Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul said he believed that vaccinations can lead to "mental disorders" in children. The idea that vaccines cause autism has been debunked, but the declining vaccination rate is making the measles resurgence possible.
NEWS
February 6, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Pandering has no boundaries in politics, even when public health is at stake. Thus we had a U.S. senator and the governor of the most densely populated state in America suggesting in the midst of a measles outbreak that it's OK not to vaccinate children against contagious diseases. New Jersey's hypocritical Gov. Christie, who was once so insistent on protecting the public that he had a healthy nurse returning from Ebola-ravaged Africa involuntarily quarantined, told reporters in London this week that "parents need to have some measure of choice" as to having their children vaccinated.
NEWS
February 6, 2015
NOW VACCINATION is a political issue? It bubbled beneath the surface before New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie injected himself into it with an off-hand (and later walked-back) remark about inoculations. But after Big Boy mentioned it, the floodgates of cable TV, Twitter and Facebook swung open. As a public-health issue degenerates into a political issue, I'm here to sort a few things out. (Spoiler alert! I am pro-vaccination.) When I was in elementary school (and leeches were used by doctors)
NEWS
February 4, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMBRIDGE, England - After Gov. Christie said Monday that parents need "some measure of choice" on vaccinating their children, stirring alarm that such views would hurt the fight against a measles outbreak, his office moved quickly to clarify his position. The dustup overshadowed the second day of what Christie has planned mainly as a trade mission. Monday morning, the Republican governor, a potential candidate for president in 2016, responded to a question about the spread of measles by saying that while he and his wife had their children vaccinated, parental concerns warrant "balance.
NEWS
December 22, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the start of the life-or-death competition in the Hunger Games series, the contestants are presented with a cornucopia teeming with tools for their survival. The protagonist, Katniss Everdeen, is warned to steer clear. As much as she needs the resources, charging into the stockpile will put her in the throes of a savage competition for dominance. Those seeking the keys to a healthy diet these days face a similar predicament. Decades of studies have produced vast stores of data about the foods and nutrients likely to enhance and extend life.
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