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NEWS
November 1, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia imposes a mandatory quarantine three or four times a year for uncooperative people with tuberculosis and is planning to automatically seek a court order as a precaution if a patient is confirmed with Ebola, officials said. The city is monitoring about 40 travelers from West Africa who arrived at five designated airports in other parts of the country. An additional 20 or so, including 11 in Burlington County, are being followed at least daily in surrounding counties in Pennsylvania and New Jersey.
NEWS
July 25, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
STUDENTS HAVE BEEN removed from a Fishtown school amid concerns over asbestos removal, a district spokesman confirmed yesterday. Students attending summer classes were told Wednesday not to report to Penn Treaty School, on Thompson Street near Berks, spokesman Fernando Gallard said. At least 40 students were moved to the nearby Adaire School, at Palmer and Thompson streets, where they will continue to take classes, sources said. Gallard said the action was taken in response to allegations by Jerry Roseman, an expert in occupational health and safety for the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers' Health & Welfare Fund.
NEWS
June 12, 2014 | By Jason Grant, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last summer, at a subdued doctor's office near 12th and Fitzgerald Streets in South Philadelphia, patients would line up 20 or 30 at once, at 11 on weekday mornings. Somehow, they knew where to be, just days after the psychiatric medical office, which bore no visible name outside, had opened, said City Councilman Mark Squilla. An armed guard hired by the psychiatric office stood watch at the front door, and patients who emerged with prescriptions would often fill them at a local pharmacy.
NEWS
May 29, 2014
EVERY ONCE in a while you get a chance to meet two needs with one action. I won't say kill two birds with one stone. This isn't about throwing stones or killing anything - just the opposite. It's about changing public policy to enhance, maybe even to save, lives; and by doing so, possibly providing a political boost to a politician who could use one. First, the policy: Community health centers for poor folks in Philly and across Pennsylvania are hurting. They're losing money big time, according to a new study by George Washington University: $29 million in Pennsylvania this year, half or more of that in Philly.
NEWS
May 17, 2014
A doctor and able advocate for health-care reform, Val Arkoosh is taking a welcome leap into politics, seeking the 13th District House seat representing parts of Philadelphia and Montgomery County. Her experience with federal health policy and as a practitioner gives her expertise in an area where clear thinking is sorely needed. She also has considerable understanding of economic, environmental, and other issues, making VAL ARKOOSH the best of the Democrats vying to succeed Rep. Allyson Schwartz in Congress.
NEWS
April 12, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania stands to recoup about $120 million in contested tobacco-lawsuit settlement funds following a court ruling Thursday that favored the state. An October decision by an arbitration panel slashed about 54 percent of approximately $335 million earmarked for Pennsylvania annually under the landmark 1998 multibillion-dollar agreement by major tobacco companies to help fund smoking cessation, medical research, and other health programs in 46 states and the District of Columbia.
NEWS
March 23, 2014 | By Dr. Daniel Taylor, For The Inquirer
Has your pediatrician ever asked you mothers out there when you plan to have your next baby? Or asked your teenage daughter when she wants to have a child? It probably never happened, but don't be surprised if your doctors become more assertive. Those who care for children know that unintended pregnancies are a huge public health problem, and I predict more doctors will be empowering families to choose their reproductive futures. A few weeks ago, I saw a 3-year-old with trouble breathing.
NEWS
March 15, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A City Council committee approved bills Thursday that would add electronic cigarettes to Philadelphia's smoke-free law and ban sales to minors, joining dozens of states and localities that are trying to slow fast-growing sales of a largely unregulated product in the absence of federal action. The known dangers of tobacco and the unknown long-term safety of e-cigarettes have split the public health community. Most of the physicians and scientists who testified at City Hall supported a prohibition on sales to minors.
NEWS
February 8, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
In one of the broadest efforts in the nation to bring sexual minorities into the medical mainstream, the University of Pennsylvania is unrolling an LGBT health initiative that spans the medical, dental, and nursing schools as well as the region's largest health system. With issues like gay marriage fast gaining in public acceptance, hospitals and universities have begun tackling LGBT health, but usually within a specific area. Drexel University, for example, started a certificate program two years ago in the School of Public Health.
NEWS
January 27, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mehmet Oz's followers believe he is a trustworthy, serious-minded (and hot) physician. His equally fervent flock of critics say he is a fad-foisting, ratings-grubbing (and smart) TV celebrity. In the 10 years since Oprah dubbed him "America's Doctor," the 53-year-old Oz has shown he is comfortable in both roles. "I just absolutely like him," said Maria Southard, 57, a food-service supervisor in the Philadelphia public schools. "I believe what he says and repeat it at home and work.
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