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NEWS
July 20, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
The Pennsylvania Supreme Court has issued a temporary injunction halting the closure of state health centers across Pennsylvania. A union representing 160 nurses at most of the 60 health centers sued after learning that the Corbett administration was planning to eliminate 26 positions and close nearly half the centers that serve populations in rural areas of the state. The union, SEIU Healthcare PA, along with several Democratic lawmakers, appealed a Commonwealth Court ruling in April denying their injunction request.
NEWS
July 1, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rationing medical care is denounced as immoral in the United States, yet it goes on daily in hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, ambulances, and pharmacies. Since 2006, this country has had worsening shortages of sterile generic injectables - drugs given by shots or intravenously. Currently, more than 300 medicines crucial to treating cancer, infections, cardiac arrest, premature infants, pain, and more are in short supply. The reasons for this predicament are complex, and the fixes, elusive.
NEWS
June 6, 2013 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Frank Lautenberg may not have appeared to be a giant of the Senate, but when you review the arc of his legislation and the consistency of his agenda, the five-term senator left a powerful legacy. "Frank Lautenberg was a hero in public health," said Jay Winsten, associate dean of the Harvard School of Public Health. "If there was a Nobel Prize in public health, he would have deserved it for his aggressive fights in the public interest and the hundreds of thousands of lives that have been saved.
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia remains the unhealthiest county in Pennsylvania, according to the latest annual rankings, though it has improved substantially in its rates of smoking, violent crime, and premature death. Chester County ranked as the state's healthiest county, a status that, like Philadelphia's, is strongly linked to social and economic factors. Bucks and Montgomery Counties also made the top 10 in the analysis, commissioned by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and Delaware County slid a few places to 41st out of the 67 counties.
NEWS
March 1, 2013 | By Jessica Parks, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If federal spending cuts kick in as planned Friday, Montgomery County would lose significant funding for seniors, students and job-seekers, Commissioner Josh Shapiro said. In a news conference Thursday, Shapiro outlined how the "the sequester" - a technical term for $85 billion in automatic spending cuts - would affect the county: Seniors - waiting lists for Meals on Wheels and senior centers; reduced funding for senior-abuse investigations; reduced transportation for medical appointments; a waiting list for family caregiver subsidies.
NEWS
February 28, 2013
New Jerseyans can breathe a sigh of relief that Gov. Christie on Tuesday joined the growing ranks of Republican governors savvy enough to put aside party loyalty and embrace a key element of Obamacare. Christie's decision to enact an expansion of Medicaid is a move that, as the governor noted in his budget speech, "will provide health insurance to tens of thousands of low-income New Jerseyans, help keep our hospitals financially healthy, and actually save money" for the state's taxpayers.
NEWS
February 4, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
His coffee consumption level hasn't changed. Nor has his sleep schedule. But Michael McTigue feels a lot more energetic at work these days, perhaps because he stands most of the time. Sitting at a traditional office desk, "I ended up exhausted at the end of the day," said McTigue, director of digital media for pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline. "There was nothing stimulating me. " About a year ago, Glaxo set up a pilot program in which employees could work at adjustable-height desks, among a slew of other workplace design changes in preparation for the company's move from its Center City offices to the Navy Yard on Monday.
NEWS
December 3, 2012
By Patrick Basham and John Luik Tobacco users should be required to obtain a "smoker's license" to buy cigarettes. So argues the academic Simon Chapman in the journal PLOS Medicine. He envisions a "smart card" system that would allow the government to limit smokers' cigarette purchases and encourage them to quit. Licensing is the antitobacco movement's latest proposal to "denormalize" smoking - that is, to portray smoking as unacceptable and smokers as deviants. It confirms that public-health elites suffer from Mary Poppins Syndrome: They won't rest until we're all practically perfect in every way. This kind of paternalism assumes (incorrectly)
NEWS
October 27, 2012 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the leader of the nation's largest health philanthrophy looks at the world today, she sees great opportunity and growing challenge. Scientists have more data and can better measure the quality of health treatments, notes Risa Lavizzo-Mourey. But "some of the things we used to look at as gaps" - income disparity and political polarization - "are now more like chasms. " And then there's money. "We are much more cognizant of health-care spending than we've ever been in the time I've been in this," said Lavizzo-Mourey, president and CEO of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, which is based in Princeton.
NEWS
October 6, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
TRENTON - State health officials say a program that allows drug users to swap dirty needles with clean ones to prevent disease transmission has shown continuing success. The Department of Health issued a report Friday recommending continuation of the Syringe Access Program. The report says the program has helped 10,000 residents of Atlantic City, Camden, Newark, Jersey City and Paterson reduce their risk of HIV and hepatitis and gain access to public health and social services.
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