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NEWS
January 27, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mehmet Oz's followers believe he is a trustworthy, serious-minded (and hot) physician. His equally fervent flock of critics say he is a fad-foisting, ratings-grubbing (and smart) TV celebrity. In the 10 years since Oprah dubbed him "America's Doctor," the 53-year-old Oz has shown he is comfortable in both roles. "I just absolutely like him," said Maria Southard, 57, a food-service supervisor in the Philadelphia public schools. "I believe what he says and repeat it at home and work.
NEWS
December 30, 2013 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
Mike Mittelman, the new president of Salus University, believes strongly in the importance of a sound body for a sound mind. During his three decades in the Navy, he ran a dozen marathons and participated in several Olympic-distance triathlons. A graduate of the Pennsylvania College of Optometry, the institution that evolved into Salus, he is frustrated that so few people are familiar with Salus, what it offers, and the exciting work it is doing not only to improve vision but also to enhance health care in a wide variety of realms.
NEWS
September 21, 2013 | By Don Sapatkin and Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writers
Larry Dennis started smoking at 16, usually Newports, and he didn't quit until March. "I stopped because I knew we couldn't smoke no more in here," Dennis, 57, said Thursday afternoon outside the Church Street towers in West Chester, where he lives in public housing. "I wanted to anyway. It was better for me. " The Housing Authority of Chester County is the first in Southeastern Pennsylvania and South Jersey to go smoke-free, although the Philadelphia Housing Authority hopes to test a policy at four pilot sites within a year.
NEWS
September 15, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Air pollution has been fingered for many health ills. For many reasons, kids are more susceptible than adults. And the wider Philadelphia region is a bad place to be susceptible, ranking among the nation's worst cities for particle pollution and ozone. Indoor air can be problematic, too, given the fumes of pesticides, new furniture, and, especially, cigarette smoke. These are some of the findings that will be discussed at a forum to educate parents about the hazards of air pollution, and what they can do. Sponsored by the Moms Clean Air Force, an advocacy group, it will be held Thursday at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University.
NEWS
September 11, 2013 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Obama administration moved Monday to insulate community nonprofits from demands of House Republicans, minimizing disruption weeks before a key part of the Affordable Care Act kicks in while potentially irking those who want to kill it. Fifteen Republicans on the House Energy and Commerce Committee sent letters two weeks ago to 51 organizations that are receiving funds for "navigators" intended to help determine eligibility and enroll people in...
NEWS
July 25, 2013 | By Brady Dennis, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - The Food and Drug Administration said for the first time Tuesday that menthol-flavored cigarettes appear to pose a greater risk to public health than standard cigarettes, largely reaffirming the findings of an agency advisory committee two years ago and potentially laying the groundwork for tighter regulations. In a 153-page "preliminary scientific evaluation," the FDA found that although there is "little evidence" to suggest that menthol cigarettes are more toxic than non-menthol cigarettes, the mint flavor of menthol masks the harshness of tobacco, making it easier to get addicted and harder to quit.
NEWS
July 20, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
The Pennsylvania Supreme Court has issued a temporary injunction halting the closure of state health centers across Pennsylvania. A union representing 160 nurses at most of the 60 health centers sued after learning that the Corbett administration was planning to eliminate 26 positions and close nearly half the centers that serve populations in rural areas of the state. The union, SEIU Healthcare PA, along with several Democratic lawmakers, appealed a Commonwealth Court ruling in April denying their injunction request.
NEWS
July 1, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rationing medical care is denounced as immoral in the United States, yet it goes on daily in hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, ambulances, and pharmacies. Since 2006, this country has had worsening shortages of sterile generic injectables - drugs given by shots or intravenously. Currently, more than 300 medicines crucial to treating cancer, infections, cardiac arrest, premature infants, pain, and more are in short supply. The reasons for this predicament are complex, and the fixes, elusive.
NEWS
June 6, 2013 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Frank Lautenberg may not have appeared to be a giant of the Senate, but when you review the arc of his legislation and the consistency of his agenda, the five-term senator left a powerful legacy. "Frank Lautenberg was a hero in public health," said Jay Winsten, associate dean of the Harvard School of Public Health. "If there was a Nobel Prize in public health, he would have deserved it for his aggressive fights in the public interest and the hundreds of thousands of lives that have been saved.
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia remains the unhealthiest county in Pennsylvania, according to the latest annual rankings, though it has improved substantially in its rates of smoking, violent crime, and premature death. Chester County ranked as the state's healthiest county, a status that, like Philadelphia's, is strongly linked to social and economic factors. Bucks and Montgomery Counties also made the top 10 in the analysis, commissioned by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and Delaware County slid a few places to 41st out of the 67 counties.
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