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NEWS
January 16, 2016
By Donald Smith and John Alviti In 1736, Benjamin Franklin's 4-year-old son, Francis Folger Franklin, died of smallpox. It was one of the great tragedies of Franklin's life. Francis, or "Frankie," was clearly an exceptional child for whom Franklin built great hopes in a short time. In the 1730s, the English-speaking world was just learning about a practice called "variolation," an early kind of vaccination against smallpox that involved deliberately giving people the active virus.
NEWS
January 14, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
Joy Tsin Lau, the Chinatown eatery where 100 lawyers and law students were sickened in February, received another scorching helping of criticism last week from the city Health Department. The dim sum restaurant "does not have adequate refrigeration equipment [or the] capacity to maintain all refrigerated foods at a temperature of 41 degrees or below," inspector Thomas Kolb wrote Thursday. Temperatures over 41 degrees promote the rapid growth of potentially toxic bacteria. In his report, Kolb wrote that jellyfish, duck, and bean sprouts were being stored at temperatures of 50 degrees or more at Joy Tsin Lau. The inspector also cited the restaurant for two additional serious risk factors - an employee eating in the kitchen prep area and another who did not follow proper hand-washing protocols - and seven lesser infractions.
NEWS
January 9, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
Add this to the list of things that were good about our warm December: It may be partly responsible for the mild beginning to this winter's flu season. "It is a very slow season, locally, statewide, and nationally," said Caroline Johnson, director of disease control for the Philadelphia Department of Public Health. "Everything seems to be much lower than usual. " Flu is spread by droplets that infected people spray into the air when they cough or sneeze, said Loren Robinson, deputy secretary for health promotion and disease prevention for the Pennsylvania Department of Health.
NEWS
November 9, 2015
ISSUE | KATHLEEN G. KANE No special treatment Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane is the top law enforcement officer in Pennsylvania and is subject to the same conditions of employment as any police officer. That means she should be suspended until the disposition of the charges she faces. If found guilty of crimes involving dishonesty, she should be fired just as her agents, troopers, and police officers would be. If she is found not guilty, she should be subject to internal discipline for any violations of policy and could be reinstated.
NEWS
October 5, 2015 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there In 2006, Zupenda and Randy were doctoral students in Drexel University's public-health program, and a budding friendship between the two outgoing flirts soon had classmates asking just what was going on between them. They admired each other's brains and charisma, and enjoyed some great conversations about music and the arts. But that, they said, was that - just friends. In 2007, Zupenda's friend Danielle, her coworker at Health Federation of Philadelphia, where Zupenda was an HIV training specialist, said there was a man Zupenda should most definitely meet.
NEWS
October 2, 2015
MENTION the word "health" and people usually think of doctors and hospitals. Those are the people and institutions that work to make individuals healthy. Public health has a broader mission - to make whole communities healthy. The first public health professionals were called "sanitarians," partly because of science's new found understanding of the link between disease and sanitation. It's hard to believe but Philadelphia did not begin to chlorinate its drinking water until 1913 - and that was decades after the link between typhoid and dirty water was a proven fact.
NEWS
October 2, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
An idea that started in the back of a car in Ethiopia 21/2 years ago culminated Wednesday with a $45 million gift to Drexel University's public health school and a new name: the Dana and David Dornsife School of Public Health. The donation, one of the largest in the university's history and by far the biggest for the public health school, will strengthen Drexel's long-standing commitment to Philadelphia neighborhoods and broaden its global work in urban health. Wednesday's announcement brings the California couple's Drexel gifts to $58 million.
BUSINESS
September 4, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Independence Blue Cross Foundation will spend $1.5 million over the next three years to improve access to primary care at safety-net health centers in Southeastern Pennsylvania, the organization said Wednesday. The 42 non-profit, privately-funded health centers in the foundation's Blue Safety Net will be eligible for grants to expand access to care through telemedicine and to explore new care models, such as the including behavioral-health services in primary care, the foundation said.
NEWS
July 30, 2015 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
As summers go, this one has been fairly benign, with only two short heat waves. Based on the forecast, the wave we're in now could end up being the longest of the season, with daily temperatures forecast to hit 90 or better into early next week. Wednesday would be the worst of it, with temperatures heading into the mid-90s and heat indexes in triple figures. But the National Weather Service has not hoisted the heat warning flags yet, and after Wednesday, the forecast highs back off a couple of degrees.
NEWS
July 20, 2015 | By Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia police said Saturday that a man was being questioned by investigators as a person of interest in connection with the death of a recent Drexel University graduate. Jasmine Wright, 27, was strangled inside her West Philadelphia apartment last week, police said. After she was not heard from, Wright's family asked police to check the apartment. Police found no signs of forced entry when they entered the unit Thursday and discovered her body. Evidence has led investigators to believe that Wright may have known her assailant.
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