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NEWS
October 5, 2015 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there In 2006, Zupenda and Randy were doctoral students in Drexel University's public-health program, and a budding friendship between the two outgoing flirts soon had classmates asking just what was going on between them. They admired each other's brains and charisma, and enjoyed some great conversations about music and the arts. But that, they said, was that - just friends. In 2007, Zupenda's friend Danielle, her coworker at Health Federation of Philadelphia, where Zupenda was an HIV training specialist, said there was a man Zupenda should most definitely meet.
NEWS
October 2, 2015
MENTION the word "health" and people usually think of doctors and hospitals. Those are the people and institutions that work to make individuals healthy. Public health has a broader mission - to make whole communities healthy. The first public health professionals were called "sanitarians," partly because of science's new found understanding of the link between disease and sanitation. It's hard to believe but Philadelphia did not begin to chlorinate its drinking water until 1913 - and that was decades after the link between typhoid and dirty water was a proven fact.
NEWS
October 2, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
An idea that started in the back of a car in Ethiopia 21/2 years ago culminated Wednesday with a $45 million gift to Drexel University's public health school and a new name: the Dana and David Dornsife School of Public Health. The donation, one of the largest in the university's history and by far the biggest for the public health school, will strengthen Drexel's long-standing commitment to Philadelphia neighborhoods and broaden its global work in urban health. Wednesday's announcement brings the California couple's Drexel gifts to $58 million.
BUSINESS
September 4, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Independence Blue Cross Foundation will spend $1.5 million over the next three years to improve access to primary care at safety-net health centers in Southeastern Pennsylvania, the organization said Wednesday. The 42 non-profit, privately-funded health centers in the foundation's Blue Safety Net will be eligible for grants to expand access to care through telemedicine and to explore new care models, such as the including behavioral-health services in primary care, the foundation said.
NEWS
July 30, 2015 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
As summers go, this one has been fairly benign, with only two short heat waves. Based on the forecast, the wave we're in now could end up being the longest of the season, with daily temperatures forecast to hit 90 or better into early next week. Wednesday would be the worst of it, with temperatures heading into the mid-90s and heat indexes in triple figures. But the National Weather Service has not hoisted the heat warning flags yet, and after Wednesday, the forecast highs back off a couple of degrees.
NEWS
July 20, 2015 | By Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia police said Saturday that a man was being questioned by investigators as a person of interest in connection with the death of a recent Drexel University graduate. Jasmine Wright, 27, was strangled inside her West Philadelphia apartment last week, police said. After she was not heard from, Wright's family asked police to check the apartment. Police found no signs of forced entry when they entered the unit Thursday and discovered her body. Evidence has led investigators to believe that Wright may have known her assailant.
NEWS
July 17, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
"LIKE A PUNCH in the gut. " That's how Keith Hooks said he felt upon hearing that Jasmine Wright, 27, his kind and quiet neighbor, had been found brutally murdered in her apartment. "It's just sick," Hooks, 53, said last night, mere feet from the slain Drexel University grad's front door, directly beside his own. "She was professional and sweet," Hooks said. "She just went about her business and didn't bother anybody. "And she certainly didn't deserve this. " Wright's body was found about 2:30 p.m. inside her third-floor apartment on 50th Street near Locust in West Philly, Homicide Capt.
NEWS
June 29, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
As a pediatrician at the Cobbs Creek Primary Care Center at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Roy Wade Jr. employs the usual tools of his trade, such as thermometer, tongue depressor, and stethoscope. But as a researcher, he is working to develop a different kind of tool kit: a questionnaire to help pediatricians figure out which of their young patients are at greatest risk to develop early cognitive, emotional, and health problems. Wade's work builds on the landmark 1998 ACE (Adverse Childhood Experiences)
BUSINESS
April 4, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than a decade ago, city health inspectors would see occasional mouse droppings at Philadelphia International Airport, black residue and slime inside ice machines, and eggs and other cold foods kept at temperatures too warm. In 2011, the airport approved the hiring of two former city health inspectors, and the results have been dramatic. Violations for risk factors known to cause food-borne illness have significantly declined. Today, the airport's 27 eat-in restaurants have a better average than the citywide numbers for 5,000 non-airport eat-in restaurants.
NEWS
February 10, 2015 | BY JOEL MATHIS & BEN BOYCHUK, Tribune News Service
    SUDDENLY, the debate over vaccines has gone mainstream. Amid a measles breakout - a disease that doctors believed had been eradicated a decade ago - a pair of Republican politicians came under fire for seemingly anti-vaccination comments. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie said that vaccinations should largely be left to parents, while Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul said he believed that vaccinations can lead to "mental disorders" in children. The idea that vaccines cause autism has been debunked, but the declining vaccination rate is making the measles resurgence possible.
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