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NEWS
July 2, 1990 | By NEAL PEIRCE
History's most infamous public-housing photo was snapped here in July 1972 as city-housing authorities dynamited the three central blocks of the massive Pruitt-Igoe project. I'd been at the terminally troubled 12-story high-rises several months earlier. It was hard to miss the trouble. Walkways were covered with shattered window glass and tin cans. In hallways, lights were broken, elevators vandalized. The stench of garbage and urine was everywhere. The "ultimate solution" for Pruitt-Igoe - the demolition of 33 buildings, broadcast to an incredulous nation - led me, and others, to a snap conclusion.
NEWS
May 9, 2003
I UNDERSTAND the need for urban renewal, and I don't want to sound cruel, but how is it that all the residents in housing projects in South Philly get newly built houses while hardworking people in South Philly have to struggle to buy a new home? I grew up in South Philly in a single-parent home and never lived in the projects - that's a testament to my mother wanting better for us. I personally know people who have generations of relatives living in the projects. Why not? It's cheap, you don't have to care for it and sooner or later, they'll build you a new home at taxpayers' expense.
NEWS
June 24, 1987 | By Charles B. Oliver and Daniel A. Witt
On May 27, 1987, the Newark, N.J., housing authority began the demolition of the Scudder Homes project. Before television news crews, the first high- rise building was leveled. This dramatic event symbolized the failure of 50 years of federal housing policy. The Scudder homes project was built in the 1960s at a cost of $20 million. In the ensuing years, the Department of Housing and Urban Development poured another $36 million into the project. Despite the massive amounts of money spent on Scudder Homes, the project became a breeding ground for crime, poverty and vandalism.
NEWS
May 7, 1999 | by Mensah M. Dean, Daily News Staff Writer
For nearly three months, 32 Philadelphia public housing residents from across the city have risen at dawn to commute to the Tasker Homes development to learn as much as they can about the building trades. "It's hard getting up in the morning to get here. But that's what it takes to make it in the trades. So there ain't much use in complaining," said Bernard Browne, 20, who rides a train, subway and two buses to get to Tasker in South Philadelphia from his Northeast apartment. The program that has Browne and his fellow residents so motivated was officially unveiled yesterday during a ceremony featuring public housing Executive Director Carl Greene, Mayor Rendell and a host of city, civic and union leaders.
NEWS
June 22, 1992
None of the horror stories in Daily News reporter Joe Daughen's story Friday on the Philadelphia Housing Authority were news to the authority's 100,000 tenants. Nor are these findings in the most recent audit of PHA by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development: 99 percent of PHA housing units flunk HUD's "decent, safe and sanitary" tests. PHA's bloated maintenance staff is so inept it takes about five years to fix up a vacant unit and move a new family into it. Routine maintenance is so sloppy PHA doesn't know how many service calls it makes or completes.
NEWS
June 8, 2007 | By Larry Eichel, Inquirer Senior Writer
When the Schuylkill Falls towers were demolished back in 1996, the promise was that the dilapidated, oversized housing project would be replaced with a viable, mixed-income community. Now, at long last, the promise is on the verge of being fulfilled. Tomorrow morning in East Falls, dignitaries including Gov. Rendell and Mayor Street are to gather to cut the ribbon on the final element of the package: A private, market-rate development - featuring a number of large and expensive homes - sitting right next to public housing.
NEWS
April 10, 1989 | By Gerald B. Jordan, Inquirer Washington Bureau
After touring public housing sites and reviewing proposals from more than 800 housing authorities, the nation's housing chief has developed a massive "sweep-up" plan aimed at eliminating drug traffic. Jack F. Kemp, secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development, planned to present the details today when he joins Attorney General Dick Thornburgh and drug czar William J. Bennett in announcing an action plan for the troubled District of Columbia. In a meeting with reporters, Kemp said he wanted his drug-enforcement proposals for the District of Columbia's public housing to be applied nationally.
NEWS
June 2, 1987 | By Roger Cohn, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tenants from five public housing developments yesterday began a 15-month training program aimed at enabling them to take over the management of their projects from the Philadelphia Housing Authority. Under the program, which is being sponsored by the nonprofit Housing Association of the Delaware Valley, the tenants will be trained in everything from rent collection to tenant selection and would ultimately assume responsibility for managing their own developments. Similar programs have worked successfully in more than a dozen cities, including St. Louis, Jersey City and Washington, where tenant organizations currently manage public housing developments under contracts with the local housing authorities.
NEWS
February 5, 2008 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Carl Greene isn't necessarily regarded as the nicest guy in town, but in his 10th year as executive director of the Philadelphia Housing Authority, he is seen as one of the most successful. Among friends and critics alike, he is overwhelmingly credited with single-handedly recasting the look of affordable housing in Philadelphia. Arriving here from Detroit in 1998 at the behest of Mayor Ed Rendell, Greene found an aging stock of public housing, much of it grim high-rises, warrens of crime and decay.
NEWS
October 12, 1986 | By Charlie Frush, Inquirer Staff Writer
In all of Burlington County's 40 municipalities, there are only three communities that have public housing authorities that offer low-rent or moderate-rent housing to the public at large. "The real story is not that there are three housing authorities but why there are not 40 housing authorities," said John Nolan, executive director of the Burlington City Housing Authority. "Not a day goes by but that somebody from Mount Holly or Willingboro or Browns Mills comes in to our office because they can find no reasonable rental facility.
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NEWS
May 7, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
The Montgomery County Housing Authority has become the latest public housing agency to ban smoking. Starting July 1, the ban affects its 616 units countywide, executive director Joel Johnson said at a county commissioners meeting Thursday. The policy prohibits smoking indoors but will allow residents to smoke outside at least 25 feet away from buildings. It mirrors bans in Philadelphia and Chester County, and a broader effort in public housing nationwide. In November, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development said it would require all federally subsidized housing authorities to implement nonsmoking policies in the next several years.
BUSINESS
March 26, 2016 | By Bob Fernandez, Staff Writer
Comcast Corp. will expand its $10-a-month discounted Internet Essentials program to residents of public housing in Philadelphia, Miami, Nashville, and Seattle in a project with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, the federal agency and the Philadelphia cable giant said Thursday morning. The new program is the latest expansion of Comcast's Internet Essentials offering that has enrolled 600,000 low-income families. The program was launched as a condition of Comcast's acquisition of NBCUniversal in 2011 and is designed to help close the nation's seemingly intractable "digital divide" by making Internet services available to poor families.
NEWS
March 10, 2016
By Kelvin A. Jeremiah The surge of growth and prosperity in many Center City neighborhoods is having little impact on Philadelphia's 400,000 families living below the poverty line. Struggling daily to meet basic needs, a Philadelphia family must earn $45,400 annually to afford a two-bedroom apartment, according to a 2014 report issued by the National Low Income Housing Coalition. However, the 2015 average annual income of Philadelphia Housing Authority's (PHA) current and wait-listed families remained at $15,300.
NEWS
August 31, 2015
The Fairmount Park Conservancy has been awarded a $3 million grant to involve local artists and arts organizations in its ongoing work to support the city's municipal park system, the organization announced Monday. The award - given by ArtPlace America, a public-private philanthropy - was one of six similar grants issued this week to regional organizations across the country, including gifts to groups in fields as varied as public housing, health care, and youth development. The goal for each award, ArtPlace Executive Director Jamie Bennett said in a statement, is to encourage what the philanthropy calls "creative placemaking" - that is, the inclusion of art and cultural projects in community development and renovation plans.
NEWS
August 31, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
If you live in Audubon Park, your neighbors are probably "the people you grew up with," says Mary Stokes, who moved there with her parents in 1941. Stokes is 74 now, and she and other residents love the villagelike coziness of this unusual Camden County municipality. Audubon Park is a single square mile between Nicholson Road, the Black Horse Pike, and Peter's Creek. It has no stores, schools, or churches, and the real estate is collective property. "There were supposed to be Audubon Parks all over America," says Kristin M. Szylvian, whose book The Mutual Housing Experiment - New Deal Communities for the Urban Middle Class was published in July by Temple University Press.
NEWS
August 28, 2015
LIKE SO MANY, I was shocked to learn that some housing units set aside for low-income families are occupied by people earning six-figure salaries. The Department of Housing and Urban Development's Office of Inspector General took a look at tenants who initially qualified for public housing but now earn more than regulations would allow first-time move-ins. The resulting report found that more than 25,000 tenants have annual earnings that exceed HUD's 2014 eligibility limits. Nearly half surpass their local threshold by $10,000 to $70,000.
NEWS
August 21, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
AS CITY LEADERS yesterday gathered under a tent cooled by fans to make speeches about the more than $500 million rebuilding plan to transform the tattered Blumberg Apartments and the surrounding Sharswood community, they couldn't hear the grumbling of residents who are being forced out this fall. Kelvin Polanco, 32, said he has not been able to sleep since receiving a letter from the Philadelphia Housing Authority in July stating that he had 90 days to move from the Oxford Street building where he operates a mini market on the ground floor and lives with his wife and two daughters upstairs.
NEWS
July 30, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a week, more than 36,000 Philadelphia public housing residents will be asked to take their cigarettes outside, an unprecedented bid to try to improve the health of some of the city's neediest tenants. Officials wondering about the new smoking ban's potential for success can look to the west. Two years ago, Chester County's housing authority started a strict policy to curb smoking among tenants: No tobacco use anywhere on its properties. It was the first housing agency in Southeastern Pennsylvania to go smoke-free.
NEWS
July 16, 2015 | By Madeline R. Conway, Inquirer Staff Writer
Finding an affordable place of her own was so important to Latoya Wright that when she learned that the Philadelphia Housing Authority was building green homes in Strawberry Mansion, she stood in line at 1 in the morning in the hope of securing a spot. The mother of two had been on the waiting list for public housing for more than a decade. The hours in line, said Wright, 31, were worth it. This week, she and her daughters - Mahagony, 13, and Jayda, 6 - will move out of her sister's home into a two-bedroom townhouse at 2800 Oakdale St., the site of 12 new affordable housing units in the North Philadelphia neighborhood.
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