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NEWS
January 13, 1996 | By Alexander Cockburn
People care about what they see on their television sets, listen to on their radios or download from the Internet - but try to arouse them on the topic of these new communications laws making everything more expensive and less democratic. Their eyes film over. It's like trying to interest a fly-fisherman in copyright law. It was the same way with health "reform. " Beaten senseless by flow charts, people gave up and reserved whatever strength remained to them for that last lurch to the emergency room.
NEWS
May 5, 1997 | By Jonathan A. Saidel
Controller candidates give an accounting of themselves If you're a Philadelphia Republican, the only contests on your ballot in the May 20 primary election will be for judicial seats. Unopposed for GOP nominations are John J. McMahon for district attorney and William J. O'Brien for city controller. In the Democratic primary, District Attorney Lynne Abraham is unopposed for renomination, but City Controller Jonathan A. Saidel is being challenged by Andre C. Dasent. The Daily News asked each Democrat why he believes he should be the party's candidate for controller in November.
NEWS
May 10, 2005 | By Kitty Hailey
What is the life of a private investigator? Contrary to the image projected by television shows, the work is not glamorous, few us of resemble Charlie's Angels, and we don't do anything in half an hour with a few commercials. Indeed, our job is often tedious and labor-intensive - but also quite rewarding and in the public interest. The average investigator is most likely involved in locating stolen and abducted children; uncovering abuse by caregivers; discovering insurance fraud; identifying evidence for the accused; protecting the workplace by performing background investigations; and preserving the rights of all people by investigating workplace violence, harassment and drug abuse.
NEWS
May 3, 1989 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
It might be time for this newspaper's Savvy Reader department to exercise its proven clarity of analysis with a report on just where things stand in the trial of Oliver North. For one thing, are the jury members reasonably healthy and at least semi- aware of what it's all about? For another, does U.S. District Judge Gerhard Gesell ever stop contemplating his own importance long enough to remember that the public has a stake in this case, too? By all accounts, the jury hasn't been heard from in over a week, when its requests for notepads, sharp pencils and paper clips had been met and one member's flare-up of blood pressure was said to have been corrected by a slight moderation of her diet.
NEWS
June 25, 2002 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joe Ragsdale remembers the heat, the still air, the old men gathered on weathered porches more than a half-century ago trading stories about sharecropping, soldiers, masters and slaves. Ragsdale's Uncle Bub - an ancient black man who helped the Union cause in the Civil War - recalled hiding in the woods as armies from North and South swept the Carolina Piedmont. The boy listened, mesmerized, as Uncle Bub described Union troops foraging, killing pigs and chickens, and stealing food not far from that very porch where they sat in Rock Hill, S.C. Fearsome saviors, the boy thought.
NEWS
September 6, 2008 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The state Supreme Court did "serious damage" to the government's ability to regulate waterfront development when it upheld SugarHouse Casino's controversial permit to build out over the Delaware River, the City of Philadelphia argued in a court filing yesterday. In a 13-page, no-holds-barred petition, city attorneys said the court's Aug. 22 decision "reflects no analysis, and ignores more than 150 years of precedent," and "blithely" casts aside the public's right to its land. SugarHouse's lead attorney, Stephen A. Cozen, could not be reached for comment.
NEWS
February 2, 1989 | By Dick Polman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The climactic moment came late in the day, when the president of NBC News was reminded that his network was licensed by the government to serve the public interest. He fired back with a sound bite that epitomized the new era of network news. For nearly 90 minutes, in a unique public session last week at Columbia University in New York, the leaders of the three network news divisions had been preaching an austerity ethic - a need to fulfill their journalistic mission while satisfying the corporate cost-cutters.
NEWS
December 29, 1997 | By Marci A. Hamilton
Cyberspace is being handed to us wrapped in bright paper with a ribbon on top. But what will be in the box when it is finally unwrapped? There was never a time when leadership by independent and thoughtful representatives was more important or more conspicuously absent. But it is also a time for the American public to take responsibility for monitoring the law of cyberspace, just as they monitor tax law and land use law, the laws that affect their lives most directly. Cyberspace is being touted as an utterly new phenomenon, as a new frontier.
NEWS
June 7, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Should the Episcopal Cathedral of Philadelphia be allowed to destroy two historically recognized buildings it owns, and build a 25-story apartment, office, and retail complex in their place, in order to finance cathedral repairs and expand its ministry? That is the question coming Friday before the Philadelphia Historical Commission, which deadlocked on the issue May 11 when it first arose. The four representatives of the Nutter administration voted in favor of demolition of the properties on the 3700 block of Chestnut Street, while all four independent members opposed the plan.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 13, 2014 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
Four news organizations, including The Inquirer, filed a motion in federal court Thursday seeking the name of the firm contracted to provide the drugs Pennsylvania would use in an execution by lethal injection scheduled for this month. The state has said the compounding pharmacy it contracted to supply the drugs would likely refuse to do so if its name were made public, according to the court papers filed in Harrisburg. In the motion filed by the American Civil Liberties Union, The Inquirer, Guardian US, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, and Philadelphia City Paper said recent botched executions in other states "have greatly increased the public's interest in lethal injection executions.
NEWS
February 15, 2014 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Comcast Corp.'s purchase of Time Warner Cable sets the stage for a fierce round of lobbying that will pit consumer advocates against one of the most savvy, well-connected, and deep-pocketed entities in Washington. Almost as soon as the deal was announced Thursday, consumer groups blasted the notion of Comcast - a giant in cable, Internet, and programming - growing even larger. "This is so over the top that it ought to be dead on arrival," said Michael Copps, a former Federal Communications Commission member who now works with the watchdog group Common Cause.
NEWS
June 6, 2013 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Frank Lautenberg may not have appeared to be a giant of the Senate, but when you review the arc of his legislation and the consistency of his agenda, the five-term senator left a powerful legacy. "Frank Lautenberg was a hero in public health," said Jay Winsten, associate dean of the Harvard School of Public Health. "If there was a Nobel Prize in public health, he would have deserved it for his aggressive fights in the public interest and the hundreds of thousands of lives that have been saved.
NEWS
May 20, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a female student in the male-dominated law school culture of the early 1970s, Eve Biskind Klothen had such a terrible time that she figured she would leave, go into public-interest law, and never return to academia. She could not have expected that she would join Rutgers School of Law-Camden, she says, serving as assistant dean for pro bono and public-interest programs. Klothen, 62, will retire in June after 11 years overseeing a pro bono program that has expanded and become, colleagues say, an expected and important part of students' experience.
NEWS
January 16, 2013
By Nancy Goldenberg A new process for reviewing the use of park and recreational land in Philadelphia is about to be tested. Thanks to a change in city law, members of the public will play a leading role tonight when the Parks and Recreation Commission reviews a proposal by Temple University to build a new boathouse on Kelly Drive. As The Inquirer reported last month, Temple officials hope to build a 23,000-square-foot boathouse on a parcel of parkland in the shadow of the Strawberry Mansion Bridge, on the eastern bank of the Schuylkill.
NEWS
December 10, 2012
Gov. Corbett is wrongly trying to circumvent Pennsylvania's open-records law by declaring his daily schedule off limits to public scrutiny. Is he trying to hide something? The governor's negative response to a reasonable request by the media to know what's on his daily agenda has morphed into a crucial challenge that could undermine the state's fledgling Office of Open Records and have a chilling effect on government openness. Corbett and his lawyers have put up roadblocks ever since Associated Press reporter Mark Scolforo filed a simple request in February 2011 to look at the governor's schedule and e-mails.
NEWS
October 21, 2012 | By Nigel Duara, Associated Press
PORTLAND, Ore. - A website with files showing the Boy Scouts of America's cover-up of decades of sexual abuse is generating interest from people wanting to know who the alleged abusers are and whether people who molested them as Scouts are in the files. Release of the files has also prompted a debate on the Boy Scouts' Facebook page. Some people said they'd never allow their children to be involved in the organization and criticized the secrecy of the files. Others described positive experiences in the Scouts for themselves or their children, saying the organization's efforts to prevent abuse have improved significantly.
NEWS
August 27, 2012 | By Raphael Satter, Associated Press
LONDON - Brace yourself, Harry. A prominent British public relations man says he has been approached by two women who claim to have more material on Prince Harry, raising the possibility that the world may soon be seeing more compromising images. Last week, the celebrity gossip website TMZ published photos of Harry romping in the nude during a party at his Las Vegas hotel suite. Many Britons have laughed off the 27-year-old prince's high jinks, but questions have been raised about his publicly funded security detail.
NEWS
August 22, 2012 | By Bob Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After winning their first round in Commonwealth Court last week, state officials are in no hurry to hear what the state Supreme Court may have to say about Pennsylvania's new voter-ID law. The state Attorney General's Office, defending the law against contentions that it will disenfranchise thousands of voters, filed papers Tuesday suggesting that the Supreme Court consider the case the week of Oct. 15 - barely three weeks before the Nov. 6...
NEWS
June 7, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Should the Episcopal Cathedral of Philadelphia be allowed to destroy two historically recognized buildings it owns, and build a 25-story apartment, office, and retail complex in their place, in order to finance cathedral repairs and expand its ministry? That is the question coming Friday before the Philadelphia Historical Commission, which deadlocked on the issue May 11 when it first arose. The four representatives of the Nutter administration voted in favor of demolition of the properties on the 3700 block of Chestnut Street, while all four independent members opposed the plan.
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