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NEWS
May 7, 2004 | By Mitch Lipka INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
New Jersey's Office of the Child Advocate is starting a citizen complaint office to investigate allegations that children have been placed at risk of abuse or neglect because of government action or inaction. Calls to the office could concern the juvenile justice system, the Division of Youth and Family Services, schools, group homes, or any other entity that deals with children's well-being. Child Advocate Kevin Ryan told the Assembly Family, Women and Children's Services Committee yesterday that the Bureau of Citizen Complaints would be staffed by lawyers and social workers in his office.
NEWS
September 16, 1993 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / SHARON J. WOHLMUTH
The new U.S. ambassador to Nigeria, Walter Carrington, was honored by Lincoln University at a reception Tuesday at the Afro-American Cultural and Historical Museum in Philadelphia. Carrington, a specialist in African affairs, is a member of Lincoln's Center for Public Policy and Diplomacy Advisory Board. He was confirmed by the Senate in August.
NEWS
February 27, 2012
Proposed taxi rule travels wrong route I have been reading with interest about City Council's consideration of a bill that would force taxis to provide wheelchair access in their vehicles. This is another intrusion into the private sector, just like the bill forcing companies to provide sick leave. Again, Council focuses on services and not jobs. People want jobs, but Council trades election votes in return for services. The result is massive unemployment, poverty, and no growth.
NEWS
January 18, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
TRENTON With little fanfare, Gov. Christie has named Dianne Solomon of Haddonfield president of the Board of Public Utilities, the state agency charged with approving rates for gas, electricity, cable, and water companies, and implementing state energy policy. A paralegal with close political ties to Christie, Solomon is the wife of Superior Court Judge Lee A. Solomon, who served as BPU president from 2010 to 2012. She succeeds Robert M. Hanna, who was confirmed this week as a judge of the Superior Court.
NEWS
August 1, 1990 | By John C. Shipley Jr., Special to The Inquirer
Keino Robinson thought he wanted to pursue a career in urban government. However, the Haverford College senior and West Philadelphia native knew little about the positions available to him. Jose Huizar, a senior at the University of California at Berkeley, knew he wanted to push for social change in his native East Los Angeles. But he was unsure how his activism could ever have a real impact on the community. Because of their uncertainties, Robinson and Huizar might well have passed up careers in public affairs for better publicized opportunities in law or business.
NEWS
March 8, 1992 | By Mac Daniel, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
David Barol of Glenside in Abington Township will run for the 153d District seat formerly held by Montgomery County Commissioner Jon D. Fox. Barol, 34, made the announcement at the Feb. 26 meeting of the Abington- Rockledge Democratic Committee. This is the first political office for which Barol has run, although he said he had worked on various political campaigns for other candidates. He will be running against Abington Commissioner Martin L. Laub, a Republican who has the party backing, as well as former Abington Commissioner Bud Hannings, who lost the endorsement to Laub.
NEWS
August 29, 1993 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Serving the public and stretching the tax dollar is the job description that first comes to mind for David O'Brien when he talks about his new position as the township's municipal manager. "What attracted me to Eastampton and this position is that it is a very hands-on kind of job in a tight-knit community," O'Brien said. "That means there is a lot of contact with the public, and I like that. " O'Brien took over the $44,000-a-year job this month after Michael Spurgeon, who held the position for three years, resigned in the spring to become business administrator in neighboring Pemberton Township.
NEWS
November 9, 2012 | By Juan Carlos Llorca, Associated Press
EL PASO, Texas - A Texas lawyer and former Carnegie Mellon University trustee pleaded not guilty Thursday to laundering more than $600 million for a Mexican drug cartel. Marco Antonio Delgado waived his arraignment Thursday, essentially entering a not-guilty plea, during a hearing in federal court in El Paso. One of his lawyers, Ray Velarde, asked Judge Norbert Garney to postpone the bond hearing for Wednesday. His other lawyer, Jose Montes, said they would seek Delgado's release on bond next week.
NEWS
September 28, 2010
By Marc F. Bellemare When world leaders assembled in New York to discuss development policy last week, there was a lot of noise about rich countries' failure to attain the Millennium Development Goals, which were adopted by the United Nations' member states in 2001. Chief among the goals is halving the proportion of people who are extremely poor - that is, living on less than a dollar a day - by 2015. The other goals involve primary education, gender equality, child mortality, maternal health, HIV/AIDS, malaria, and environmental sustainability.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 18, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
TRENTON With little fanfare, Gov. Christie has named Dianne Solomon of Haddonfield president of the Board of Public Utilities, the state agency charged with approving rates for gas, electricity, cable, and water companies, and implementing state energy policy. A paralegal with close political ties to Christie, Solomon is the wife of Superior Court Judge Lee A. Solomon, who served as BPU president from 2010 to 2012. She succeeds Robert M. Hanna, who was confirmed this week as a judge of the Superior Court.
NEWS
July 13, 2013
More than a month after the fatal building collapse at 22d and Market Streets, Mayor Nutter is still withholding pertinent public records. Nutter, who promised voters a transparent government, says it's because a grand jury is investigating the collapse. But the office of District Attorney Seth Williams, which is overseeing the investigation, says Nutter does not have to suppress public information. Reinforcing public-records experts' analysis, a Williams spokeswoman said in a statement that "there is no reason that public officials cannot discuss issues of public policy arising from publicly available facts and materials.
NEWS
April 30, 2013
TO STU Bykofsky: I generally like your columns, so I am disappointed by this one. It is important and good to expose the corruption and ineptitude of the city government. They certainly deserve it. What I do not like is the general "can't do" attitude that is an epidemic in Philadelphia. This city needs something to be proud of other than just its past, and it needs significant modernization. Hosting the Olympics can do both, along with being really fun (that should not be overlooked)
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer ransomj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
TWO MONTHS after a 5-year-old girl was abducted from her West Philadelphia school, City Council on Thursday held a hearing to examine the school district's policies for early dismissal. "For every bad thing, something good can come of it. What I hope comes of this is good public policy," said Councilman Curtis Jones Jr., who arranged the hearing. "It's a teaching moment, and all of us are paying keen attention to this issue. " The girl was taken Jan. 14 from Cullen Bryant Elementary, at 60th Street and Cedar Avenue, by a woman who was dressed in Muslim garb and posed as the girl's mother before signing her out of school.
NEWS
November 9, 2012 | By Juan Carlos Llorca, Associated Press
EL PASO, Texas - A Texas lawyer and former Carnegie Mellon University trustee pleaded not guilty Thursday to laundering more than $600 million for a Mexican drug cartel. Marco Antonio Delgado waived his arraignment Thursday, essentially entering a not-guilty plea, during a hearing in federal court in El Paso. One of his lawyers, Ray Velarde, asked Judge Norbert Garney to postpone the bond hearing for Wednesday. His other lawyer, Jose Montes, said they would seek Delgado's release on bond next week.
NEWS
October 31, 2012
By Jennifer Donahue President Obama and Mitt Romney have made their cases to the American public through grueling daily campaign events, three televised debates, and the conventions. The result is a tie, and voters on the left and right won't break it. That will fall to a small group of people who don't vote regularly, but will be moved to head to the polls next week. This race will likely be decided by a fence-sitting 5 percent of the electorate in just nine swing states. The key to these undecided voters' late-breaking decisions - and the election - won't be the campaign promises the candidates have made.
NEWS
May 21, 2012 | Letter to the Inquirer Editor
When beliefs and policy collide The letter "So-called skeptic can't serve" (May 13) claims that objections to a "global-warming skeptic" on the Board of Public Utilities are akin to persecution of religious dissent from "orthodoxy. " I don't know the specific viewpoint of the board member in question, but as a rabbi with a background in science, I find this argument deeply flawed. The fact that scientific ideas are widely accepted does not render them "orthodoxy. " Differences in religious doctrine are not subject to proof or disproof.
NEWS
February 8, 2012 | By Steve Frank
The debate about who should decide the legal status of same-sex marriage, now unfolding in New Jersey and nationwide, is as old as the Constitution. Should the people decide in a referendum, as Gov. Christie maintains? Or should the Legislature or the courts settle it? While New Jersey ponders that question, Washington's state Legislature is poised to pass a bill allowing same-sex marriage. For anyone keeping score, that will bring the number of states that have permitted gay marriage by legislation or court order to seven.
NEWS
January 22, 2012
The Corbett administration claims it doesn't agree with the extremist viewpoints of a former welfare policy adviser. However, recent edicts reflect the adviser's opposition to public support of health care for children, food for the poor, and day care. Robert Patterson, a policy adviser with the state Department of Public Welfare, resigned from his $104,470 job after Inquirer reporters Angela Couloumbis and Amy Worden asked about his side job as an editor at a conservative journal, Family in America, which opposes abortion, homosexuality, and women in the workforce.
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