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NEWS
December 22, 2012 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
Smokers now face steep fines for lighting up in Cherry Hill parks and playgrounds and outside township-owned buildings under an ordinance that went into effect Thursday. The ordinance, passed by the Township Council last month, sets a minimum fine of $100 for a first offense, with penalties for subsequent offenses escalating as high as $500. The ban applies to all public property, including Town Hall, the public library, and trails, parks, and playgrounds. Police will enforce the ordinance mainly by responding to complaints, officials said.
NEWS
November 14, 2003 | By Anthony S. Twyman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Deploring what he called "a form of graffiti," City Councilman Richard Mariano persuaded his fellow Council members yesterday to approve a bill that would ban campaign posters on public property. "They're ugly. They're terrible, even if they have my name on them," Mariano said. With the Nov. 4 election over and campaign posters still plastered throughout the city, Council voted, 12-4, for the bill. David Cohen, Darrell Clarke, Angel Ortiz and Blondell Reynolds Brown voted against the measure.
NEWS
September 30, 1997 | By Stephanie A. Stanley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Spray your initials on a cinder block wall and you could be charged with criminal mischief, institutional vandalism, criminal trespass, criminal conspiracy, and - as stated in a new township ordinance - possession of graffiti instruments. Bensalem last night became the first community in a nine-municipality cooperative effort, Towns Against Graffiti, to outlaw the sale of spray paint and indelible markers to minors. The other municipalities, Bristol, Morrisville and Tullytown Boroughs and Bristol, Falls, Lower Makefield, Lower Southampton and Middletown Townships, are expected to adopt the same get-tough-on-graffiti ordinance by the end of next month.
NEWS
January 5, 2011
IT'S THAT TIME of year again. The first snowfall, kids outside playing, parents taking their children sledding - and idiots fist-fighting over saved parking spots. It amazes me that we haven't seen a story gracing the front page regarding someone getting stabbed or shot. It's a disgrace that people are allowed to save parking spots. The property from the curb into the street belongs to the city. Everyone has to shovel out, and you can't claim your spot forever. I remove trashcans, cones, buckets and chairs from spots even when I'm not looking to park.
NEWS
October 27, 2006 | By Joel Bewley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As a heating and cooling repairman for the Burlington County government, Louis Spadaccino had easy access to every facility. But he was doing more than making sure thermostats worked properly, county officials alleged yesterday when announcing his arrest. The 36-year-old Delran resident was also busy pilfering public property and selling it for cash over the last three years, according to court papers charging him with official misconduct and receiving stolen property. The swag ranged from traffic cones snatched from the highway department to laptops lifted from the chambers of two Superior Court judges, officials said.
NEWS
December 3, 2010 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
And so, after four days of squabbling, the sign over City Hall's clutch of seasonal shops blinked on Thursday evening, uncensored. "Christmas Village" it read once again, with the provocative - and briefly erased - word Christmas restored in large, golden lights. Mayor Nutter's decision Wednesday to reverse other city officials, who had changed the name of the shops to Holiday Village, has not entirely calmed the waters. "People feel very strongly" about allowing religious names and images on public property, said Sarah Mullen, associate director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
November 4, 1998 | Inquirer photographs by Michael Perez
It's beginning to look a lot, or at least a little, like Christmas in Center City Philadelphia. Public Property workers began hanging holiday garlands yesterday morning, and will be at it for another two weeks or so.
NEWS
June 23, 2000 | by Ericka Bennett, Daily News Staff Writer
Skate on! For now. Skateboarders dodged a bullet when a bill proposed by City Councilman Michael Nutter was tabled for the summer by Council yesterday. The bill would have banned skateboarding on all public property unless otherwise authorized. It would have also raised fines up to $300, and given police officers the power to take away boards. During Council's final session of the year, skateboarding was a dominant issue on its crowded agenda. Councilwoman Jannie Blackwell fought for the boarders' right to ride on public property.
NEWS
December 11, 1986 | By HOWARD SCHNEIDER, Daily News Staff Writer
District Attorney Ronald D. Castille has threatened to sue City Council for failing to approve two leases needed to relocate his staff from its cramped quarters on Chestnut Street to newly renovated office space on Arch Street. Castille said in a letter delivered to Council members yesterday that their failure to act on the leases was depriving his staff of adequate space and working conditions. That, he charged, violates Council's legal obligation to provide his staff with suitable resources to carry out its law-enforcement duties.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
A proposal to add 10 percent or $1.8 million to the annual fee Philadelphia Gas Works pays to the city has been put off until the fall, according to city officials. The measure, proposed last month by Councilman Curtis Jones Jr. as a means to generate additional revenue for the cash-strapped city, was approved by the Public Property and Public Works Committee on June 6. But the bill was greeted skeptically by Councilwoman Marian B. Tasco, the chairwoman of the Philadelphia Gas Commission.
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NEWS
January 3, 2016 | By Jessica Parks, STAFF WRITER
Mayor-elect Jim Kenney released another round of appointments Friday morning, keeping three commissioners in their posts and tapping two new department heads. Those staying on in the new administration are Arthur C. Evans Jr., commissioner of Behavioral Health and Intellectual Disability Services; Thomas Conway, deputy managing director of the Community Life Improvement Program; and Bridget Collins-Greenwald, commissioner of Public Property. "Arthur, Tom and Bridget have provided strong leadership and oversight to their respective city departments.
NEWS
June 6, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia City Council committee approved a bill Thursday to allow the city to pay $90 million for the 27-acre property known as International Plaza on Route 291 in Tinicum Township, Delaware County, as part of a long-range expansion of Philadelphia International Airport. The measure is expected to come up for a full City Council vote later this month. The city-owned Philadelphia airport appraised the property at $75 million in 2013. The current owners, affiliates of Angelo Gordon & Co. and Amerimar Enterprises Inc., appraised the site, which has two office buildings, at $101 million.
NEWS
December 14, 2013 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
City Council on Thursday unanimously approved the long-awaited land-bank bill, and Mayor Nutter promptly vowed to sign it - clearing the way for Philadelphia to become the largest city in the country with a land bank. The goal of the bank is to cut through City Hall red tape and create a comprehensive system for confronting blight by turning vacant and tax-delinquent parcels into tax-producing properties. Thursday's vote was something of a formality, since the tough part of agreeing on the bill's amendments was hashed out last week between its primary sponsor, Councilwoman Maria Quiñones Sánchez, and Council President Darrell L. Clarke.
NEWS
October 30, 2013 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
After years of talking the talk about getting a land bank in Philadelphia, where blight scars entire neighborhoods, City Council started Monday to walk the walk. On a 6-1 vote, Council's Committee on Public Property and Public Works approved a bill to establish a land bank. The bill still needs a vote of the full Council. If it approves, Philadelphia would become the largest city with a land bank. Land banks streamline the process for rescuing blighted property, whether by homeowners who want to turn a vacant lot next door into a garden or developers who hope to buy clusters of houses to make way for a major project.
NEWS
October 15, 2013 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Augusta "Gussie" Clark, an ambitious woman from the South whose move North involved an evolution from publishing assistant to librarian to lawyer before joining Philadelphia City Council and becoming an unrelenting advocate for the city's public schools, died Sunday. She was 81. Born in Alabama, Mrs. Clark was the second African American woman to serve on City Council. She retired in 2000, 20 years after her first political service as a Democratic councilwoman-at-large. Former Mayor Wilson Goode, Sr., called her "a great Philadelphian who was a trailblazer in so many ways, and did so much to improve this city.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
A proposal to add 10 percent or $1.8 million to the annual fee Philadelphia Gas Works pays to the city has been put off until the fall, according to city officials. The measure, proposed last month by Councilman Curtis Jones Jr. as a means to generate additional revenue for the cash-strapped city, was approved by the Public Property and Public Works Committee on June 6. But the bill was greeted skeptically by Councilwoman Marian B. Tasco, the chairwoman of the Philadelphia Gas Commission.
NEWS
March 27, 2013
Consider the unappreciated trash truck that ambles along the streets of the city day after day. It probably can't get any uglier, but it may get a little flashier under City Council President Darrell L. Clarke's creative plan to turn city property into revenue by selling advertising space. Other cities and local transit agencies have used public property, including garbage trucks and other vehicles, to drum up advertising revenue. SEPTA is expected to make about $14 million this year from advertising for Tropicana orange juice, Baileys Irish Cream, Honda, AT&T, and others.
NEWS
March 14, 2013
ANY TIME the Harrisburg Patriot-News reviews salaries of state employees, it creates a nice voyeuristic buzz in the capital city. So it is this week following publication, online and in print, of a series of stories, "The $100,000 Club," about state government's top take-homers. (It's viewable at pennlive.com.) Who doesn't like to know what their neighbor makes? And what's more fun than comparing government pay with government productivity? Gives ranters a chance to rant, "They get HOW much?"
NEWS
February 15, 2013 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer ransomj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
CITY COUNCIL sees dollar signs on publicly owned property. Sound familiar? Council President Darrell Clarke introduced legislation more than a year ago to authorize digital ads on city-owned property, and he plans to reintroduce the bill Thursday. "I think it's very important, as I have said time after time, to create revenue opportunities for the city . . . other than sticking our hands into the citizens' pockets and increasing taxes," said Clarke. A consultant for Council said that the city could generate $8 million from advertising on public buildings, bus shelters, trash trucks or receptacles.
NEWS
December 22, 2012 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
Smokers now face steep fines for lighting up in Cherry Hill parks and playgrounds and outside township-owned buildings under an ordinance that went into effect Thursday. The ordinance, passed by the Township Council last month, sets a minimum fine of $100 for a first offense, with penalties for subsequent offenses escalating as high as $500. The ban applies to all public property, including Town Hall, the public library, and trails, parks, and playgrounds. Police will enforce the ordinance mainly by responding to complaints, officials said.
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