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NEWS
October 22, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
BACK IN 1982, the nation was terrorized by the Tylenol poison scare. Although the fatal poisonings of seven people, including a 12-year-old girl, from taking cyanide-laced Extra-Strength Tylenol capsules were confined to the Chicago area, repercussions were felt everywhere. Johnson & Johnson, parent company of McNeil Consumer Healthcare, the drug's manufacturer, pulled 32 million packages of Tylenol off the shelves of stores throughout the nation, taking a huge nose-dive in profits as a result.
NEWS
October 4, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Abe S. Rosen, 94, a newspaper reporter and public relations executive, who served as Philadelphia city representative and director of commerce from 1966 to 1968, died Sunday, Oct. 2, at Abington Memorial Hospital of complications from congestive heart failure. Mr. Rosen moved to the Abramson Center for Jewish Life in Horsham earlier this year. Before that, he had lived in Lower Southampton since 1990. From January 1968 to September 1970, Mr. Rosen was president of the Philadelphia Convention and Tourist Bureau, as the agency was known at that time.
NEWS
October 4, 2011 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
HERE'S HOW to ward off a curse, or overcome triskaidekaphobia (fear of the No. 13), courtesy of Abe S. Rosen: Walk over a bed of peanut shells on Friday the 13th, reciting the phrase, "Anyone who does this is absolutely nutty. " When he would send this advice to columnists on a Friday the 13th, Abe didn't hide the fact that his public-relations agency represented Edwards-Freeman Nut Co. in Conshohocken. It was part of Abe's skill in the grand tradition of the old-time press agents who would stop at very little to plug a client.
NEWS
March 1, 1988
The Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission's new public relations firm has not been hired officially yet, but already it's made an impact on the image of the turnpike agency - a negative one. Pittsburgh-based Skirboll & Garber Inc. competed last month against four other public relations firms for a contract worth an estimated $50,000 to $100,000, and won the preliminary approval of the five-member turnpike commission. The problem is, one of the commissioners voting to award the work to Skirboll & Garber was James J. Dodaro, whose campaign for the Democratic nomination for Attorney General received a $1,000 contribution in October from a Garber executive.
NEWS
February 16, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Violet Branch Johnson, 94, a retired public relations executive, died Jan. 20 of complications from a stroke at Stapeley, a retirement residence in Germantown. Mrs. Johnson grew up in South Philadelphia and graduated from West Philadelphia High School. She earned an associate degree from Temple University. At 13, she joined the Girls' Friendly Society, a social and service organization affiliated with the Episcopal Church. She remained involved with the organization for the next 50 years, singing in its choir and later organizing concerts and mentoring younger members.
NEWS
October 3, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Abe S. Rosen, 94, a newspaper reporter and public relations executive who was Philadelphia City Representative and director of commerce from 1966 to 1968, died of complications from congestive heart failure on Sunday, Oct. 2, at Abington Memorial Hospital. In 1970, he co-founded the public relations firm, Sommers-Rose. In 1983, he co-founded the Rosen-Coren Agency, where he was active until recently. Mr. Rosen is survived by daughters Ellen Coren and Irene Garber and four grandchildren.
NEWS
February 18, 1990 | By Michelle Rizzo, Special to The Inquirer
Discussion over whether to include money in the general fund for the Bristol Township School District's new public relations commission dominated the school board's meeting Thursday. The board voted, 7-2, to give the volunteer commission, formed last month, $1,000 for start-up expenditures. There was some confusion among board members as to whether the group wanted the money or whether it planned to raise the money itself. The group wants to sell sweatshirts, book covers and pencils emblazoned with the district's new logo to raise funds.
NEWS
February 9, 1992 | By Tina Kelley, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
How much would you spend for a better self-image? That's what Gloucester City has to decide, as it considers hiring a public relations firm to boost the city's image and put out a community newsletter. The council's interview with Sharon Schulman of Spe-Schul Communications of Vineland on Monday revealed that the firm would charge $6,000 for its services, Councilman John McKinley said. Printing costs for the quarterly newsletter would cost an additional $3,200. Schulman, president of the firm, said later last week that she also would issue press releases for the city, and, if necessary, help arrange public meetings to encourage residents to voice their opinions on city issues.
NEWS
May 12, 1993 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joseph V. Baker, 84, a public relations pioneer who was building bridges between corporate America and the black community long before the federal government took any affirmative action, died Friday at his home in Germantown. During much of his career as a journalist, politician and public relations man, Mr. Baker was going where few, if any, black men had gone before. During the Great Depression, he was in Harrisburg, first as director of the Division of Negro Research and Planning for the state Department of Labor and Industry, then as the director of Negro Work for the Republican State Committee.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 27, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Louise C. Guthrie, 97, formerly of Wayne, a longtime public relations professional, died Monday, Sept. 22, of heart failure at Beaumont at Bryn Mawr, where she was a resident. From 1967 to 1982, Mrs. Guthrie was the director of school and community relations for the Upper Merion School District. After retiring from the school district, she ran her own public relations business. She served as a charter member and vice president of the Pennsylvania School Public Relations Association and as vice president of the Pennsylvania Community Education Association.
NEWS
July 31, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Louise T. "Tuck" Brennan, 96, a pioneering executive, community leader, and world traveler, died Wednesday, July 23, of pneumonia at Foulkeways in Gwynedd. In 1966, Mrs. Brennan joined American Olean Tile Co. in Lansdale, as the plant's head tour guide. Within three years she had become the company's first female executive. As public relations director, she produced an account of the firm's 50-year history; was responsible for getting the company's tile products regularly featured in the nation's top magazines, and traveled widely to identify noteworthy examples of the company's products being used in homes and offices and other buildings.
BUSINESS
May 25, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Facing a summer of discontent from unhappy commuters, the Delaware River Port Authority (DRPA) is looking to burnish its image by hiring a public relations agency. Track reconstruction work on the DRPA's Ben Franklin Bridge will inconvenience commuters on the PATCO rail line and motorists on the toll bridge, especially during a two-month period that will start May 30. Commuters already have been complaining about delays, breakdowns and crowded PATCO trains during construction outages on Fridays and weekends, and the DRPA is still dealing with customer outrage over broken escalators and elevators after a maintenance contract was allowed to lapse last July.
NEWS
October 22, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
BACK IN 1982, the nation was terrorized by the Tylenol poison scare. Although the fatal poisonings of seven people, including a 12-year-old girl, from taking cyanide-laced Extra-Strength Tylenol capsules were confined to the Chicago area, repercussions were felt everywhere. Johnson & Johnson, parent company of McNeil Consumer Healthcare, the drug's manufacturer, pulled 32 million packages of Tylenol off the shelves of stores throughout the nation, taking a huge nose-dive in profits as a result.
NEWS
September 14, 2013 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Though she's from Western Pennsylvania - sorry, folks, she's a Steelers fan - Miss Pennsylvania, Annie Rosellini, knows her way around a cheesesteak and Philly's best places to shop. After spending her freshman year of college in Philadelphia studying lyrical dance at the University of the Arts, Rosellini fell in love with Philly. Her dorm was in Center City and she loved walking around and window-shopping along Walnut Street - the shoes, the sweaters, the dresses, with a few art galleries thrown in. It was an artsy girly-girl's dream come true.
NEWS
August 31, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
The NFL had considerable legal defenses in its fight with retired players over injuries caused by the violent collisions that are at the heart of the sport, not the least of those being a contract with the players that substantially restricts lawsuits. But in the face of public opinion, and the potential damage to its image, those defenses likely became much less important to the league. The prospect of slugging it out with the players in a multiyear litigation battle in which damaging information is disclosed and the public is regularly reminded of the sport's sometimes brutal impact on player health likely was a powerful incentive for the league to settle.
NEWS
June 11, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
BILL FLEISCHMAN might have put it best: "Bobby Lyons was a genuine Philly sports guy. " Like many Philadelphia sportswriters, past and present, Bill Fleischman, longtime Daily News sports correspondent and auto-racing reporter, knew and respected Bobby Lyons as a consummate professional, yet one who never called much attention to himself. He was a sports reporter for the Associated Press and the old Evening Bulletin, author of several highly regarded books on different aspects of sports, former sports-information officer for La Salle University, head of its news bureau and operator of his own public-relations company.
NEWS
March 12, 2013 | By Chris Freind
Thank God for small miracles. Or, in this case, huge ones. The decision by Pope Benedict XVI to resign has given the Catholic Church an unprecedented opportunity to save itself. Whether the conclave of cardinals in Rome takes advantage of this blessing remains to be seen. As one of the Catholic faithful, I desperately want to believe the conclave will choose wisely, and that it will: Do whatever is necessary to rebuild the greatest, most benevolent institution the world has ever known; Admit that its hard times - the sex-abuse scandal, corruption in the Vatican, and genuflecting at the wrong altar (that of political correctness)
NEWS
January 29, 2013
WHEN I HEARD that Sally Starr had died, I thought of my father, Phil, himself gone 14 years next month. I thought of his reaction when, in the summer of 1984, I announced that I was hoping to bring "Our Gal Sal" - who hadn't been heard from for 12 years - back to Philly as a way to publicize the RV Roundup, a recreational-vehicle exhibition scheduled for the old Civic Center that September. I was public-relations director for a Center City ad agency whose clients included the Roundup.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2013 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there After five years working and living in New York City, Nikki, who grew up in Broomall, decided it was time to come home. "It was a feeling I had. I was ready," she remembered. "I knew I never wanted to live in New York to raise a family. " She lined up a freelance gig in public relations and events, crossed her fingers it would lead to permanent employment, and moved to an apartment in Society Hill. As for that family-raising part, Nikki hadn't a clue when that would happen.
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