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NEWS
December 27, 1998
With the unveiling of the Frank Rizzo statue on the steps of the Municipal Services Building planned for Jan. 1, this question comes to mind: What other works of art do the public spaces of the city and suburbs need? What person, event or thing would you like to see so honored in your neighborhood? Why? Send essays of 100 words or less by Jan. 11, including a phone number for verification, to Community Voices/Heroes at the addresses listed in the Where to Write box above. Questions?
NEWS
April 2, 2012 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
The Kimmel Center is getting a beauty makeover, its most substantial since initial construction ended after opening day in 2001. On the heels of a recent acoustical adjustment to Verizon Hall, the Kimmel is renovating two major quasi-public spaces in hopes of becoming more hospitable and profitable. Work on the rooftop garden is under way. Ficus trees atop the Perelman Theater have been cleared to make way for a new glass-and-steel structure - a large glass box within the larger glass bubble - that will shield users from the extreme temperature swings that have rendered the space largely unusable.
NEWS
April 19, 2011 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
In his new book, The Cosmopolitan Canopy : Race and Civility in Everyday Life , Elijah Anderson tells of a rainy afternoon at Reading Terminal Market. He was doing what he does best - conducting a bit of folk ethnography. People-watching, in layman's terms. But anybody who knows this sociologist knows he's anything but a layman. Though he teaches at Yale now, Philadelphia is who he is and where he still lives. The ethnographer spent most of his professional life at Penn, where he did the research for two of his acclaimed books, Streetwise and Code of the Street.
NEWS
October 14, 1990 | By David Johnston, Inquirer Staff Writer
Once this beach resort south of San Francisco had a prosperous downtown where a single lane of traffic meandered among an eclectic mix of architectural styles, its charm marred only by the trolls. Many people were scared away by the trolls - the homeless, the mentally disturbed and the deadhead veterans of too many electric Kool-Aid acid trips who gathered on the Pacific Garden Mall. At night some of these downtown denizens slept under bridges spanning the San Lorenzo River two blocks away, hence the local name: trolls.
NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
They've reconstructed the space in front of Philadelphia's palatial City Hall, furnished it with a cafe, a high-tech spray fountain and movable chairs, and rebranded it Dilworth Park . But the vast granite prairie is still very much a plaza , with all the weaknesses the word implies. There is no doubt that this important civic space, once a smelly, run-down municipal embarrassment in the heart of Philadelphia, has been greatly improved by the Center City District's Paul Levy, who marshaled a dream team of Philadelphia's most renowned designers and engineers.
NEWS
August 13, 1989 | By FASAHA M. TRAYLOR
How charming! If we do not give spare change to people living on the street; if we enforce a policy of maintaining public spaces, including public toilets, for use by the public; if we recognize that the problems of homeless substance abusers are getting worse, then we may be able to reclaim a sense of public order in Center City. Unfortunately, this will not be enough. Getting tough with the homeless requires that we get much tougher with ourselves. Unless we are willing to assign scarce police manpower to revolving rousts of homeless bench-dwellers and grate-sleepers, solutions depend on the availability of long-term, in- patient drug-treatment programs, low-income housing and group homes.
NEWS
November 14, 2006
Readers weigh in on Sunday's story "Stunned by sale, but not giving up. " Chris Bordelon Philadelphia chrisbordelon@gmail.com Little good will come of efforts to keep the Thomas Eakins painting languishing in its little-visited display. Although "many" may view the work as "the very heart of Philadelphia's cultural identity," how many Philadelphians have seen the painting? While it is an important work, it is unlikely that its departure would deprive the city of its cultural vitality.
NEWS
June 4, 2000
Baptists Coming. The National Baptist Convention will hold its 2002 annual meeting in Philadelphia, drawing 25,000 to 30,000 delegates to the city. . . Frozen Out. A New Jersey court ruled that a Camden County woman may destroy frozen embryos left over from her failed marriage despite her ex-husband's objections. . . Smoke Studied. Hoping to garner support from angry restaurant owners, City Council agreed to set up a panel to study a controversial measure that would ban smoking in most enclosed public spaces.
NEWS
March 4, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Without fanfare, the Philadelphia Museum of Art has opened its new two-floor art-handling facility - 62,000 square feet hewn from schist and granite deep beneath the museum's Fairmount knoll. Begun in November 2010 at the base of the facade facing the Schuylkill, the $81 million facility was substantially completed by October 2012, about $5 million below budget. Though not everything is quite finished, it has been increasingly busy in recent months. This bit of practical engineering - the workaday heart that pumps life through the museum's public spaces - represents the complicated, all but invisible answer to a difficult question: How to add to the existing 600,000 square feet of self-contained neoclassical stone set atop a hill?
NEWS
April 20, 2012 | By Larry Atkins
Temple student Ian Van Kuyk was arraigned this week on charges of obstruction, resisting arrest, and disorderly conduct. Van Kuyk, a film and media arts major, was arrested by Philadelphia police last month after he photographed a routine traffic stop in front of his apartment building for a photojournalism course. Asserting his First Amendment right to record police activity in public, Van Kuyk had refused when officers asked him to stop taking pictures. The officers allegedly pushed, shoved, and threw Van Kuyk to the ground before handcuffing him. Van Kuyk's girlfriend, who tried to rescue his camera, was also charged with obstruction and disorderly conduct.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 31, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
NO SAVESIES! That's what people in one city councilman's camp are saying with a bill that would make it illegal to "sell" your temporary public parking spot to a nearby driver in dire need of one. Councilman Bill Greenlee is trying to get ahead of what he says is a growing trend of private citizens selling public parking spaces - a practice that he says is both dangerous and illegal. The measure comes in the form of an ordinance he plans to introduce this morning that would apply to both metered spots and free street parking.
NEWS
September 17, 2014
ISSUE | SMOKING Expand N.J. ban Congratulations to CVS for its decision to stop selling tobacco products. And shame, shame on Gov. Christie for his recent veto of a smoking ban in public parks and beaches, especially after New Jersey lawmakers approved the bill. His disregard for our representatives in Trenton and the health and future of New Jerseyans should be remembered. |Mary T Gramkowski, Haddonfield ISSUE | CONCERTS Share those vibes Sarcasm aside, it's a great suggestion from a recent letter writer that Made in America concerts take place in a different neighborhood.
NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
They've reconstructed the space in front of Philadelphia's palatial City Hall, furnished it with a cafe, a high-tech spray fountain and movable chairs, and rebranded it Dilworth Park . But the vast granite prairie is still very much a plaza , with all the weaknesses the word implies. There is no doubt that this important civic space, once a smelly, run-down municipal embarrassment in the heart of Philadelphia, has been greatly improved by the Center City District's Paul Levy, who marshaled a dream team of Philadelphia's most renowned designers and engineers.
NEWS
July 12, 2013
By Harris Steinberg There is a quiet revolution sweeping through Philadelphia. Just look at the bumper crop of new public spaces popping up across the city. From last year's breakaway standouts - the Porch at 30th Street and Sister Cities Café and garden - to this year's leafy-bowered pop-up beer garden across from the Kimmel Center, Philadelphians are being treated to a renewed form of urbanity. This is a new Philadelphia that fills in the rough edges lost to urban renewal and decades of disinvestment; a new Philadelphia born in the spaces we left for dead in the mad dash to modernize, revitalize, and remain relevant in the 20th century.
NEWS
March 4, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Without fanfare, the Philadelphia Museum of Art has opened its new two-floor art-handling facility - 62,000 square feet hewn from schist and granite deep beneath the museum's Fairmount knoll. Begun in November 2010 at the base of the facade facing the Schuylkill, the $81 million facility was substantially completed by October 2012, about $5 million below budget. Though not everything is quite finished, it has been increasingly busy in recent months. This bit of practical engineering - the workaday heart that pumps life through the museum's public spaces - represents the complicated, all but invisible answer to a difficult question: How to add to the existing 600,000 square feet of self-contained neoclassical stone set atop a hill?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2013 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
Sometimes, when guests step inside the Washington Square condominium of Gail Caskey Winkler and her husband, Roger Moss, there's a classic double-take moment. Past the typical 1960s architecture in the building's public spaces, a sudden sense of grandeur grabs you - all the way from antiquity forward. In the vestibule, a classic black-and-white patterned floor of marble and granite, rests a first-century B.C. amphora, a carrying vessel that looks its age. But on a wall nearby is an unmistakably modern steel sculpture.
NEWS
December 12, 2012
By Rick Sauer and Donald L. Haskin While for-profit developers across the country are postponing or even canceling major projects, community development corporations are confronting their challenges and revitalizing Philadelphia neighborhoods. A few examples: Last year, the $45 million Aramingo Crossings Shopping Center opened on the site of an abandoned Tioga Pipe plant, once seen as a major barrier to Port Richmond's progress. Anchored by a Walmart and a Lowe's Home Improvement store, the center created more than 700 jobs.
NEWS
August 17, 2012 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer
CITY COUNCIL took a rare break Thursday from its summer recess to address violent crime in the city's parks and recreation centers after several recent shootings and the rape of a 12-year-old girl occurred in public spaces. "Parks have become abandoned by people who are afraid to use them," said Councilwoman Cindy Bass, who is chairwoman of the Committee on Parks, Recreation and Cultural Affairs and who called for the committee hearing. Michael Resnick, the city's public-safety director, said the city is battling an uptick in overall violence and a 4 percent increase in violent crime in and around parks and rec centers compared with the first eight months of last year.
NEWS
August 5, 2012 | By Thomas Adamson, Associated Press
PARIS - It's a July evening on the terrace of the legendary Cafe Flore. A coiffed woman sips chilled wine, another savors her chocolate eclair. The one thing to complete a perfect picture of Parisian life? A dash of French rudeness. It comes from the waiter, who snootily turns away a group of tourists: "There's no point waiting," he shrugs, even though there are many empty tables. "No space outside. " Such rituals of rudeness have long been accepted by visitors as part of the price of enjoying such a beautiful city as Paris.
NEWS
April 20, 2012 | By Larry Atkins
Temple student Ian Van Kuyk was arraigned this week on charges of obstruction, resisting arrest, and disorderly conduct. Van Kuyk, a film and media arts major, was arrested by Philadelphia police last month after he photographed a routine traffic stop in front of his apartment building for a photojournalism course. Asserting his First Amendment right to record police activity in public, Van Kuyk had refused when officers asked him to stop taking pictures. The officers allegedly pushed, shoved, and threw Van Kuyk to the ground before handcuffing him. Van Kuyk's girlfriend, who tried to rescue his camera, was also charged with obstruction and disorderly conduct.
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