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NEWS
March 8, 1999
Fifteen years ago, the city agreed to make way for public access television, to create studios and provide technical training so citizens could broadcast cable shows over specially set-aside channels. The agreement came after the 1983 repeal of a Federal Communications Commission law requiring public access television. Cable providers agreed to pay the city a franchise fee, part of which was to help pay for setting up studios and producing shows. Fifteen years of fees later, Philadelphia is the only major city without public access television facilities.
NEWS
November 3, 2005 | By John Sullivan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Attention casino developers: Don't try to plunk a bland brick box topped with flashing neon lights into historic Philadelphia. And we want art, public spaces and landscaping, too, says a casino zoning ordinance that City Councilman Frank DiCicco is expected to introduce in City Council today. The ordinance is intended to let casino developers know what the city wants. It also is intended to send a message to state legislators that the city expects to have a say in what the two Philadelphia casinos will look like and where they will go. "We do not need the state legislature to tell us we're going to wind up with a casino and not have any say in it," DiCicco said.
NEWS
August 26, 2008 | By Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The number of homeless people living on Center City streets was lower this summer than last, according to the most recent quarterly census of Philadelphia's street population. Project HOME, which conducts an overnight survey once a quarter for the city, reported yesterday that the census last Wednesday showed that there were 475 people sleeping on city streets or in parks - down from 621 people a year ago. In a broader area that included not only Center City, but also parts of West Philadelphia and Kensington, the street census was 572, down from 698 a year ago. The drop in the summer number followed a similar decline in the spring census for Center City - 261 vs. 429. Last summer's homeless number was the highest in 10 years, putting pressure on city officials.
NEWS
August 5, 1990 | By Thomas Hine, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Six years ago, developer Willard G. Rouse 3d plunged Philadelphia into an identity crisis when he announced his intention to transgress the city's informal height limit and construct two buildings taller than the statue of William Penn atop City Hall. The most visible result of this decision is on the skyline, where there are half a dozen buildings, either completed or substantially so, that can look down on the recently reconstructed tower of City Hall. Indeed, the controversy helped Philadelphians focus on the tower and statue, which were seen to be crumbling and requiring attention.
NEWS
June 14, 2000 | By Jacqueline Soteropoulos, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Brian Lathrop, a 36-year-old skateboard enthusiast, told City Council members yesterday that unless Philadelphia provided suitable alternatives, there would be no way to keep skateboarders out of public parks. But Councilman Michael Nutter is proposing a means for police to rid all public property of the high-flying, fast-riding skateboarders - confiscate their wheels. Yesterday, six out of seven Council committee members agreed. Next, the full Council will take up the issue before members break for summer recess.
NEWS
March 2, 2005 | By Stephen Henderson INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Any visitor to the Supreme Court can see it, high above the red velvet drapes and marble columns in the justices' august courtroom: a depiction of Moses, carrying the Ten Commandments. One might think the presence of Mosaic law in the nation's highest court would give lift to arguments that there is nothing wrong with the commingling of church and state. Today, when the court hears two blockbuster cases challenging Ten Commandments monuments at the Texas Capitol and in two Kentucky courthouses, the justices will be confronted with briefs that cite the high court's depiction - and the nation's history - as proof that wedded images of church and state are just fine.
NEWS
February 6, 2004 | By Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A mere seven months after its splashy debut onto the casino scene, the Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa has decided it's time for more. The casino announced this week it would start formal planning on a 500,000-square-foot expansion - a 20 percent increase in the public areas of the mammoth 2,002-room, four-million-square-foot casino in the city's Marina section. Bob Boughner, chief executive officer of the fabulously successful hotspot, yesterday said the expansion would accommodate new restaurants and bars, a "significant" increase in retail, additional casino space, and more meeting areas.
REAL_ESTATE
October 10, 2004 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
From the street, Eric Berg's house is virtually indistinguishable from the rest of the 1900 block of Delancey Place. But when you walk through the front door and head up the stairs, you come face to face with one of the things that make this house different: Massa. It isn't all that surprising that Berg, whose bronze sculpture of the legendary gorilla has graced the Philadelphia Zoo for 24 years, would have a smaller version of Massa in his house. Berg's bronze menagerie includes copies of Philbert the Pig from Reading Terminal Market, the Drexel University dragon, the Bear and Three Turtles on Fitler Square, the Galapagos Tortoise at the Academy of Natural Sciences, a snail, doves, toads, and a giraffe.
NEWS
November 3, 1996 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Bowing to residents who objected to the purchase of land in neighboring Medford Township for a new public-works facility and municipal building, borough officials will delay action until a questionnaire is distributed. The council plans to postpone any decision on the $300,000 purchase of 15 acres at Lenape Trail and Tuckerton Road until its Jan. 23 meeting, said Borough Councilman David Wasson. The council was swayed by opinions expressed during a standing-room-only meeting on Oct. 24, when many residents opposed spending any money to purchase the property.
NEWS
March 15, 1998 | By Michelle Crouch, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
On a hot day last July, Bryan Shane Marks, 22, told his mother that he wanted to stop using: cocaine, heroin and marijuana. He called a dozen drug-treatment programs, detailed his addiction to the faceless voices on the other end of the line, and begged for help. One by one, they refused. Some were too full. Others he couldn't afford. One told him that if he was really serious about treatment, he should call back in 10 days. He didn't have 10 days. On July 25, less than a week later, he died of a massive drug overdose.
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