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NEWS
June 14, 2000 | By Jacqueline Soteropoulos, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Brian Lathrop, a 36-year-old skateboard enthusiast, told City Council members yesterday that unless Philadelphia provided suitable alternatives, there would be no way to keep skateboarders out of public parks. But Councilman Michael Nutter is proposing a means for police to rid all public property of the high-flying, fast-riding skateboarders - confiscate their wheels. Yesterday, six out of seven Council committee members agreed. Next, the full Council will take up the issue before members break for summer recess.
NEWS
March 2, 2005 | By Stephen Henderson INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Any visitor to the Supreme Court can see it, high above the red velvet drapes and marble columns in the justices' august courtroom: a depiction of Moses, carrying the Ten Commandments. One might think the presence of Mosaic law in the nation's highest court would give lift to arguments that there is nothing wrong with the commingling of church and state. Today, when the court hears two blockbuster cases challenging Ten Commandments monuments at the Texas Capitol and in two Kentucky courthouses, the justices will be confronted with briefs that cite the high court's depiction - and the nation's history - as proof that wedded images of church and state are just fine.
NEWS
February 6, 2004 | By Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A mere seven months after its splashy debut onto the casino scene, the Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa has decided it's time for more. The casino announced this week it would start formal planning on a 500,000-square-foot expansion - a 20 percent increase in the public areas of the mammoth 2,002-room, four-million-square-foot casino in the city's Marina section. Bob Boughner, chief executive officer of the fabulously successful hotspot, yesterday said the expansion would accommodate new restaurants and bars, a "significant" increase in retail, additional casino space, and more meeting areas.
REAL_ESTATE
October 10, 2004 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
From the street, Eric Berg's house is virtually indistinguishable from the rest of the 1900 block of Delancey Place. But when you walk through the front door and head up the stairs, you come face to face with one of the things that make this house different: Massa. It isn't all that surprising that Berg, whose bronze sculpture of the legendary gorilla has graced the Philadelphia Zoo for 24 years, would have a smaller version of Massa in his house. Berg's bronze menagerie includes copies of Philbert the Pig from Reading Terminal Market, the Drexel University dragon, the Bear and Three Turtles on Fitler Square, the Galapagos Tortoise at the Academy of Natural Sciences, a snail, doves, toads, and a giraffe.
NEWS
November 3, 1996 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Bowing to residents who objected to the purchase of land in neighboring Medford Township for a new public-works facility and municipal building, borough officials will delay action until a questionnaire is distributed. The council plans to postpone any decision on the $300,000 purchase of 15 acres at Lenape Trail and Tuckerton Road until its Jan. 23 meeting, said Borough Councilman David Wasson. The council was swayed by opinions expressed during a standing-room-only meeting on Oct. 24, when many residents opposed spending any money to purchase the property.
NEWS
March 15, 1998 | By Michelle Crouch, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
On a hot day last July, Bryan Shane Marks, 22, told his mother that he wanted to stop using: cocaine, heroin and marijuana. He called a dozen drug-treatment programs, detailed his addiction to the faceless voices on the other end of the line, and begged for help. One by one, they refused. Some were too full. Others he couldn't afford. One told him that if he was really serious about treatment, he should call back in 10 days. He didn't have 10 days. On July 25, less than a week later, he died of a massive drug overdose.
NEWS
August 16, 1992 | By DAVID RUDOVSKY
Recent decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court reveal a disturbing paradox in First Amendment jurisprudence. The court has strengthened fundamental free speech protections by several rulings that underscore government's obligation to remain neutral in its regulation of the content of speech. At the same time, however, the court has ratified a different kind of censorship, one based on the nature of the physical area in which persons seek to exercise free speech. This broad discrimination, which limits speech in such areas as airport terminals and shopping malls, threatens the vitality of the First Amendment by failing to adjust free speech principles to demographic and other social changes.
NEWS
September 23, 2003 | By David B. Brawer
Recently I took a tour of the new Liberty Bell Pavilion. As I walked through Philadelphia's newest monument I couldn't help but cast a sad, wistful glance to the old pavilion. This small building, much loved by architects and much hated, it seems, by just about everyone else, likely will be demolished when the bell takes up residence in its new home on Oct. 9. After 27 years this jewel of modern architecture may soon be just a memory. For an architect who completed his education at the University of Pennsylvania at the moment of its creation, this is a poignant, yet revealing, milestone.
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
In a series of incremental steps over the past few years, the Kimmel Center has changed its physical campus to reflect a revamping of its original mission. Instead of a broad goal of importing the best in a wide spectrum of musical styles from around the world, the Kimmel has walked away from certain genres and carved out smaller performance areas to present others. And rather than developing its prime public spaces - at a time when beer gardens, pop-up parks, and cafes are proliferating elsewhere in the city - the Kimmel has turned them over to paying patrons, rendering them considerably more exclusive.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2014 | BY LAUREN McCUTCHEON, Daily News Staff Writer mccutch@phillynews.com, 215-854-5991
THREE hundred LED light strips rain colors upon grass. Dozens of rainbow-hued hammocks dangle from sweet gum trees. Seventeen-foot-tall metal sculptures send mist onto passers-by. A boardwalk offers concessions and classic arcade games. Hydrangea and coneflowers sprout from bean-shaped floating gardens. Six-by-10-foot net pods cantilever over the Delaware River, awaiting people brave enough to climb in and hang out. There's a faux pebble beach with umbrellas and old-fashioned, Atlantic City-style sling-back chairs.
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