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NEWS
October 22, 2010
By Jonah Goldberg It took 410 days to build the Empire State Building, and four years to erect the Golden Gate Bridge. The Pentagon took a year and a half, and the Alaska Highway just nine months. These days, it takes longer to build an overpass. For instance, planning for Boston's "Big Dig" officially began in the early 1980s with a budget of $2.6 billion, but ground wasn't broken until 1991, and the last ramp wasn't opened until 2006. The final estimated cost: $22 billion. According to the Boston Globe, it won't be paid off until 2038.
NEWS
October 31, 2003 | By Sam Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Investigators have found no evidence of wrongdoing at the Gloucester County Department of Public Works following a probe into allegations of overtime abuse and insurance fraud, authorities said yesterday. The investigation was begun "several weeks ago" after an employee told county officials of an overtime scheme. The Gloucester County Prosecutor's Office conducted the investigation. "The claims that they were padding overtime and overcharging an insurance company were unsubstantiated," said Ed Sholinsky, spokesman for the Prosecutor's Office.
NEWS
January 18, 1987 | By William J. Beerman, Special to The Inquirer
The Haddon Heights Council has adopted a set of public works goals for 1987. The goals include improving the public works department's image by starting a public works hotline; resurfacing eight streets; sprucing up recreation facilities and other public property, and analyzing how public works employees and equipment are being used. The council on Tuesday devoted its first work session of the year almost exclusively to discussion of how to improve municipal services. Council president Edward Fitzgerald, chairman of council's public works committee, initiated the discussion on ways to improve the public works department's relations with the public.
NEWS
January 3, 1988 | By William J. Beerman, Special to The Inquirer
The Haddon Heights Borough Council yesterday voted to appoint a borough police sergeant as public works superintendent, after deciding not to reappoint the man who had held the job for the last seven years. Mayor August A. Longo said the $31,000 post held by James Funkhouser, 55, since 1980 would be filled by Sgt. James Young. The replacement of Funkhouser is effective immediately, said the mayor. In an interview after the vote to dismiss Funkhouser, Longo called the former public works superintendent a "true gentleman and a very hard worker, who brought the department up to a point, but we've got to move it beyond that point.
NEWS
February 10, 1986 | By Janice Heller, Special to The Inquirer
The Pemberton Township Committee, dissatisfied with the results of a county grand jury investigation of the town's public works department, has decided to reconvene its own investigation. Township officials, who estimated that up to $100,000 worth of property had been misappropriated by public works employees, said they were unhappy that the grand jury investigation had focused only on public works administrators. During a long meeting that began Friday night, the four members of the five-member committee who remained at the meeting decided early Saturday to try to determine if other employees were involved in the theft of township property.
NEWS
October 22, 1996 | By Larry Lewis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The public works chief of Camden fired while he was helping a corruption probe of his department has filed a federal lawsuit, claiming Mayor Arnold W. Webster and other city officials punished him for being honest. Carl Bowles of Tinton Falls in Monmouth County said in the suit that city leaders violated his freedom of speech, defamed him and violated the New Jersey statute created to protect whistleblowers. Bowles' attorney, Linda B. Kenney of Red Bank, has asked the court to restore her client's back pay and award him compensatory and punitive damages.
NEWS
June 6, 1991 | By Louis R. Carlozo, Special to The Inquirer
Monroe Township police are investigating a break-in at the public works building last weekend that resulted in more than $5,000 in damage and the theft of shop equipment valued at thousands of dollars. According to police, the building on U.S. Route 322 was entered sometime between Friday night and 9 a.m. Saturday. "They just trashed everything they could," Public Works Director V. James Agnesino said. "Things they could've stolen, they just damaged. It was a vindictive thing.
NEWS
December 4, 1986 | By S.E. Siebert, Special to The Inquirer
The police and public works departments in Whitpain Township have joined forces to deter the dumping of household trash along public roads in the township. During the supervisors' meeting Monday night, public works director Ron Cione said random dumping of garbage bags, sofas and automobile parts on neighborhood streets had increased steadily over the last year. In addition to the smell and the mess, the debris from open bags often ends up in underground drains and causes road flooding, he said.
NEWS
September 20, 1992 | By Alison F. Orenstein, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Voorhees Township Committee approved a new contract with the township's 36 public works employees Monday night. Under the contract's provisions, the township's blue-collar workers will get a 3.5 percent raise retroactive to Jan. 1, 1991, and a 5 percent raise retroactive to Jan. 1 of this year, according to Charles F. Mann Jr., Voorhees Township administrator. Although the contract covers a two-year period, it will expire on Dec. 31, only 3 1/2 months after the Township Committee accepted it. The previous contract expired at the end of 1990.
NEWS
March 2, 1989 | By Tom Linafelt, Special to The Inquirer
West Chester Borough Council is looking to the public works department for potential budget cuts should its appeal of the gross receipts tax be rejected. Planned road and parking improvements may be shelved, and personnel decisions may be delayed, finance committee chairman Richard Fazio said Tuesday. The department's budget could be cut by as much as $100,000 for salaries and equipment to ease a $200,000 budget deficit should the appeal be rejected. Fazio was to present a list of potential budget cuts at a meeting last night.
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NEWS
February 26, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The three young Camden County police officers grow wide-eyed as a woman explains why her boyfriend is clutching his elbow, wincing between cigarette puffs. "He can move his fingers, but his bone is sticking out," she says. The injury, apparently from slipping on ice, is hidden beneath his puffy black coat. The officers radio for an ambulance. "How many days ago this happen?" Officer Christian Jeffries asks. "Two days," the woman responds. "He don't like hospitals. " "I don't either," Jeffries quips.
NEWS
November 11, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Arthur R. Maugeri, 91, of Burlington City, who retired in 1984 as superintendent of the Burlington City Public Works Department, died Sunday, Nov. 3, at the Marcella Center of the Genesis Healthcare network in Burlington Township. "He only went up to the eighth grade," son Arthur J. said. In the worst of the Depression, in the early 1930s, "he left school to support the family. " Mr. Maugeri was one of the eldest of 11 children, his son said, and among other jobs, he worked at a shoe factory in town, making less than a dollar an hour.
NEWS
February 25, 2013
Suspect named in Vegas deaths LAS VEGAS - A man was being sought Sunday as the prime suspect in a shooting on the Las Vegas Strip last week which led to a fiery crash that left three people dead and several others injured. Las Vegas Police Capt. Chris Jones said Sunday that investigators are sorting through evidence to find Ammar Harris, 26, after the discovery Saturday of a black SUV used as a getaway car in the shooting and six-vehicle chain-reaction carnage. Jones cited "lots of information coming at us all at once, especially on the Range Rover" that was seen speeding away from the scene Thursday.
NEWS
December 6, 2012
By Chad Goerner An Inquirer poll this fall showed that New Jersey residents are increasingly in favor of municipal consolidation and shared services. It may not be clear to elected officials attached to "home rule" in a state with 566 municipalities (soon to be 565), but the residents are right. A year ago, the residents of Princeton Borough and Princeton Township, where I'm the mayor, approved the state's first large municipal consolidation in more than a century - a move expected to save millions and improve services.
NEWS
October 30, 2012 | By Jan Hefler, David O’Reilly, Edward Colimore and Barbara Boyer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Somewhat to their surprise and much to their relief, South Jersey communities inland awoke Tuesday to find they were relatively unscathed from Sandy. There were downed trees and power outages all over, but early assessments found nothing much worse, though the lingering loss of power was beginning to try some residents' patience by Tuesday afternoon. Burlington County is dispatching crews and emergency equipment to neighboring Ocean and Atlantic Counties, which were hit a lot harder, Ralph Shrom, the county spokesman, said Tuesday.
NEWS
October 30, 2012 | Associated Press
NORTH BERGEN, N.J. - Not only is Nicholas Sacco the mayor of this township on the Hudson River, he's also its state senator and assistant superintendent of schools. "Where does he find the time?" Gov. Christie asked about Sacco at a town hall meeting last month. Christie has been flaunting Sacco's resume and paychecks - he makes nearly $300,000 a year - as an example of why New Jersey needs to pass an ethics reform bill that would ban residents from holding multiple public jobs, a longstanding New Jersey tradition.
NEWS
October 15, 2012
By Reese Palley Philadelphia officials should consider emulating a Chicago program that is using private-sector financing to improve infrastructure, create thousands of jobs, and save millions of dollars - all without raising taxes or issuing bonds. This is different from selling or leasing existing infrastructure to private firms to generate income, which Chicago and other cities have done. Such privatization of parking garages, bridges, toll roads, and other facilities can bring city governments cash, but that's all. It doesn't tend to generate jobs or improve infrastructure.
NEWS
September 7, 2012 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
After the demolition of a garage, Bill Nickens can better envision what he hopes to do with the vacant land behind the United Neighbors of Whitman Park Community Center: Build a track for remote-controlled toy cars. "I'm going to call it 'the Jump-Off,' " Nickens, 48, said. "The moms and pops will be here, too. " The track would be a way to draw in families. What he and his community center partners want is to redirect the crime-ridden and impoverished neighborhood and turn the tide on the deadly violence sweeping the city.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2012 | BY MOLLY EICHEL, Daily News Staff Writer
BEFORE WE get started, let's get one thing straight: Philadelphia is full of beautiful pieces of public art - art that makes our jaws drop when we see them, pieces that we can barely describe without losing our breath from excitement, things we force our visiting friends to see. We also love that Philly was the first city to implement the "One Percent for Fine Arts" rule. Every developer who gets approved to do work on Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority property must budget at least 1 percent of the building's construction cost to commissioning site-specific public art. And if you haven't done the Association for Public Art's Museum Without Walls audio tour of public works along the Ben Franklin Parkway, you are seriously missing out. OK, now that that's out of the way, we feel it necessary to point out that there are also some really god-awful examples of public art in this city: Pieces we're embarrassed about; pieces that make us laugh with one simple mention; pieces we try to steer visitors away from.
NEWS
March 1, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood and Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writers
For John Davis, it was a dream winter - over by Halloween. That would have been just after a freak Oct. 29 storm of heavy, wet snow collapsed tree limbs, ripped down power lines, and set Davis and his public-works colleagues throughout the region to worrying: Here we go again. But after back-to-back brutal winters, neither Davis nor his peers or the best minds of meteorology imagined that that storm would be the worst of the "winter" of 2011-12. "Ordinarily you spend the winter plowing or getting ready for plowing," said Davis, borough manager in Doylestown, where tight streets and well-used sidewalks make snow removal an adventure.
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