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NEWS
March 9, 1988 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Staff Writer
A dispute over who should pay to replace a dilapidated bridge over railroad tracks in Berwyn, Chester County, could affect the safe maintenance of thousands of railroad crossings nationwide, according to a state Public Utility Commission attorney. At a hearing Monday in Philadelphia, John Gallagher, assistant counsel in the PUC rail division law bureau, asked a three-judge panel of the Third U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to overturn a lower court ruling that the PUC cannot require Amtrak to pay 20 percent of the $2 million tab for the Cassatt Avenue bridge near the Berwyn train station.
BUSINESS
June 17, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
The Pennsylvania Senate on Wednesday unanimously approved the nomination of David Sweet, a Philadelphia lawyer and adviser to former Gov. Rendell, to a five-year term on the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission. Sweet, 67, a Democrat, was nominated by Gov. Wolf last month to replace Pamela A. Witmer, whose term expired at the end of March. Sweet was a senior advisor to Wolf, focusing on energy and economic development issues, and served as liaison to the Philadelphia Regional Port Authority.
NEWS
April 21, 1986
Major changes are in the works for utility customers in Pennsylvania, and the public can be the beneficiary. The state Senate is expected to act tomorrow on a sweeping overhaul of the Public Utility Commission. Under consideration is an amended version of a bill passed by the House last year. There is no mistaking the intent of the legislation. It is meant to beef up the PUC's authority to regulate utilities, especially electric utilities, and particularly Philadelphia Electric Co. The proposed reforms would ensure that PE and other Pennsylvania utilities cannot automatically balance their books on the backs of ratepayers.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1986 | By Neill Borowski, Inquirer Staff Writer
Consumers in Pennsylvania should be able to continue not only to make but receive telephone calls from public pay telephones, a Public Utility Commission administrative law judge recommended yesterday. In all but a few cases, Bell Telephone Co. of Pennsylvania should be required to furnish the two-way service on its public phones, the law judge, Larry Gesoff, advised the PUC. Bell of Pennsylvania has asked the PUC for approval to convert some pay phones to outgoing-only service.
NEWS
April 25, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Drivers for Uber, the electronic ride-hailing service, will be permitted to use older vehicles, the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission ruled Thursday. Uber drivers will be able to use vehicles that are up to 10 years old, with fewer than 350,000 miles. But they must wait until new PUC regulations are approved by the state Independent Regulatory Review Commission and published in the Pennsylvania Bulletin, which could be June. Lyft, a competing service that also offers rides in private cars, won a similar ruling from the PUC in March.
NEWS
October 22, 1992 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
An administrative law judge has recommended to the state Public Utility Commission that Media Water Co. receive a 12.6 percent rate increase, not the 31.8 percent increase requested by the water company. If approved by the PUC, the lower rate increase would represent $486,604 in additional revenue. The 31.8 percent increase requested by Media Water would have generated about $1.2 million. The average annual residential bill for water company customers is $204. That would rise to $229.
NEWS
January 29, 1987 | By Walter F. Roche Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
The chairman of the House Appropriations Committee said yesterday that he was "appalled" that Thornburgh administration budget aides had blocked the hiring of new audit personnel and other workers by the state Public Utility Commission. Rep. Max Pievsky (D., Phila.), who chairs the House budget panel, made the comment yesterday after officials of the PUC and the Office of the Consumer Advocate appeared before the panel to defend their respective budget requests for the coming year.
NEWS
June 4, 1986 | Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Action on a bill to reauthorize the state Public Utility Commission has been put off for at least a week, legislators said yesterday. A House-Senate conference committee seeking to come up with a compromise between sharply different versions of the PUC bill met briefly yesterday to receive a compromise bill proposed by Rep. Charles Laughlin (D., Beaver), the House chairman of the committee. The senators on the committee said they would need more time to study the proposed bill.
NEWS
June 12, 1990 | By Robert Zausner, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Bill Shane confirmed yesterday that he will resign as chairman of the Public Utility Commission, an action that could create a dispute over a replacement and leave the panel unable to break tie votes. The Inquirer reported in March that Shane had told fellow commissioners several months ago that he was seeking new employment. He refused to comment at the time. Shane, 54, a former legislator who has served as a member of the PUC since 1984 and as its chairman since 1987, said he would resign but refused to comment further when reached at his home in Indiana, Pa. The PUC's press office issued a three-sentence notice that Shane would "provide details on his pending resignation" at a news conference tomorrow.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1989 | By Dan Stets, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia Electric Co. spent up to $269 million more than was necessary to build the Limerick 2 nuclear plant, a study released yesterday by the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission said. PE could have completed the $2.9 billion plant four years earlier than it did, and construction delays accounted for $245 million to $265 million in added costs, according to the report by Richard Metzler & Associates, a consulting firm based in Chicago. The rest of the cost overrun resulted from a design problem and inefficient control of inventories, the study said.
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