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BUSINESS
April 23, 1986 | By Neill Borowski, Inquirer Staff Writer
Consumers in Pennsylvania should be able to continue not only to make but receive telephone calls from public pay telephones, a Public Utility Commission administrative law judge recommended yesterday. In all but a few cases, Bell Telephone Co. of Pennsylvania should be required to furnish the two-way service on its public phones, the law judge, Larry Gesoff, advised the PUC. Bell of Pennsylvania has asked the PUC for approval to convert some pay phones to outgoing-only service.
NEWS
October 22, 1992 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
An administrative law judge has recommended to the state Public Utility Commission that Media Water Co. receive a 12.6 percent rate increase, not the 31.8 percent increase requested by the water company. If approved by the PUC, the lower rate increase would represent $486,604 in additional revenue. The 31.8 percent increase requested by Media Water would have generated about $1.2 million. The average annual residential bill for water company customers is $204. That would rise to $229.
NEWS
January 29, 1987 | By Walter F. Roche Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
The chairman of the House Appropriations Committee said yesterday that he was "appalled" that Thornburgh administration budget aides had blocked the hiring of new audit personnel and other workers by the state Public Utility Commission. Rep. Max Pievsky (D., Phila.), who chairs the House budget panel, made the comment yesterday after officials of the PUC and the Office of the Consumer Advocate appeared before the panel to defend their respective budget requests for the coming year.
NEWS
June 4, 1986 | Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Action on a bill to reauthorize the state Public Utility Commission has been put off for at least a week, legislators said yesterday. A House-Senate conference committee seeking to come up with a compromise between sharply different versions of the PUC bill met briefly yesterday to receive a compromise bill proposed by Rep. Charles Laughlin (D., Beaver), the House chairman of the committee. The senators on the committee said they would need more time to study the proposed bill.
NEWS
June 12, 1990 | By Robert Zausner, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Bill Shane confirmed yesterday that he will resign as chairman of the Public Utility Commission, an action that could create a dispute over a replacement and leave the panel unable to break tie votes. The Inquirer reported in March that Shane had told fellow commissioners several months ago that he was seeking new employment. He refused to comment at the time. Shane, 54, a former legislator who has served as a member of the PUC since 1984 and as its chairman since 1987, said he would resign but refused to comment further when reached at his home in Indiana, Pa. The PUC's press office issued a three-sentence notice that Shane would "provide details on his pending resignation" at a news conference tomorrow.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1989 | By Dan Stets, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia Electric Co. spent up to $269 million more than was necessary to build the Limerick 2 nuclear plant, a study released yesterday by the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission said. PE could have completed the $2.9 billion plant four years earlier than it did, and construction delays accounted for $245 million to $265 million in added costs, according to the report by Richard Metzler & Associates, a consulting firm based in Chicago. The rest of the cost overrun resulted from a design problem and inefficient control of inventories, the study said.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2001 | By Akweli Parker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Verizon Communications Inc. accepted the terms of an April 11 state order yesterday, avoiding the possibility that it might be forced to split its Pennsylvania operations in two. "The commission made the right call in its order," Daniel J. Whelan, president of Verizon Pennsylvania, said. Prior to a Public Utility Commission decision in March, Verizon had been under a cloud of uncertainty in Pennsylvania: The state was considering breaking the company into separate wholesale and retail divisions.
BUSINESS
November 16, 1988 | By Dan Stets, Inquirer Staff Writer
Linda C. Taliaferro, one of two Republicans on the Public Utility Commission, said yesterday that she would step down in December to join the Philadelphia office of a major Pennsylvania law firm. Taliaferro, whose term would have expired March 31, took part in some of the PUC's most heated debates, including the decision to allow Philadelphia Electric Co. to complete the Limerick 2 nuclear plant in Montgomery County under a $3.2 billion cost cap. In an interview yesterday, Taliaferro said that sharply higher consumer demand for electricity over the last two summers indicated that the plant would be needed and that the PUC was justified in allowing PE to go ahead with it. "The peaks hit were not being predicted until 1996 and 1997," said Taliaferro, who was chairwoman when the PUC decided to allow PE to complete Limerick 2. The plant is scheduled to begin commercial operation in late 1990.
NEWS
March 28, 1990 | By Robert Zausner, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Bill Shane, chairman of the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission, has told fellow commissioners and some staff members that he is seeking other employment, including a Commonwealth Court judgeship, and it appears he could leave the rate-setting panel in several months. Shane, 54, reached in Washington, said he would not discuss the issue. "I don't want to talk about it," he said, adding, "At all. " But others said they were aware of his interest in leaving the PUC, an esoteric yet powerful agency that, among other things, considers requests for utility rate increases.
NEWS
March 6, 1992 | By Nancy Petersen, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
St. Peters Village along French Creek in northern Chester County has plenty going for it - scenic beauty, fun shops, a good restaurant and an abundance of historic Victorian-era charm. It does not, however, have water meters. Angry owners of the 25 businesses and homes in the village - all members of the St. Peters Condominium Association - say that the lack of water meters is the most glaring symptom of a water system out of control. As it stands now, all customers pay a flat amount regardless of how much water they use. Yesterday, the association filed a complaint with the state Public Utility Commission asking the agency to step in and regulate the Warwick Water Co. and the Warwick Drainage Co. as a public utility.
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