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Pulitzer Prize

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NEWS
April 16, 2014 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
INGA SAFFRON had a plan, and it didn't involve winning the highest honor in American journalism. But the Inquirer's architecture writer took one for the team about 3 p.m. yesterday when she bagged the 20th Pulitzer Prize in the newspaper's history. "I was slipping out quietly to cook, when people started coming over to my desk," Saffron said of the foiled plan to slink away unnoticed to prepare a Passover seder for 10 people. Those dang Pulitzers. Get handed out at the most inconvenient times.
NEWS
April 13, 1990 | By Sydney Trent, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Inquirer yesterday won a Pulitzer Prize gold medal for public service for articles by reporter Gilbert M. Gaul exposing lax federal regulation of the blood industry. The medal honored a five-part investigative series, "The Blood Brokers," last fall by Gaul, 38, a business reporter who has covered health economics for The Inquirer since 1983. Another public-service award went to the Washington (N.C.) Daily News for stories revealing that the city's water supply was contaminated by carcinogens.
NEWS
April 8, 1992 | By Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER The Associated Press contributed to this article
Signe Wilkinson of the Philadelphia Daily News won the 1992 Pulitzer Prize for editorial cartooning yesterday, and in a champagne-soaked speech, she thanked some of her suppliers: Saddam Hussein, President Bush, Clarence Thomas, Alan Simpson and "the divine" Ted Kennedy. Called the "attack Quaker" by colleagues, Wilkinson is the first woman to win journalism's highest honor for editorial cartoonists. While acknowledging the importance of political subjects, she said that she tends to mine social issues for cartoons - matters like schools, neighborhood life and "what people are up against day in and day out. " Addressing a staff feasting on hoagies, cookies and the bubbly, Wilkinson peeled back the dark blue lapels of her personalized Daily News jump suit and showed off her "Republican pearls.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
  After winning a Pulitzer Prize last week for his second book of poetry, Digest , Gregory Pardlo, Philly born and Willingboro-raised, says he's still a little delirious. "Each day I wake up thinking, ' Man, that was a weird dream,' " Pardlo says. He heard the news in an ordinary setting: while waiting for his 10-year-old daughter after school. He got a congratulatory text message, and he thought it was for the Hurston-Wright Legacy Award he'd been nominated for a few weeks prior.
NEWS
April 16, 2010
CONGRATULATIONS TO Wendy Ruderman and Barbara Laker for winning the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting for the "Tainted Justice" series! It was courageous reporting that was necessary. Honest officers have nothing to worry about. Dishonest ones, beware, you will be exposed. Shawna Holts Philadelphia
NEWS
October 6, 2013
A story Friday on a service honoring Staff Sgt. Randall Shughart, a Pennsylvanian killed in a 1993 battle in Somalia, misstated how many Pennsylvanians died in that battle. Sgt. First Class Earl Fillmore Jr., 28, of Blairsville, also died. In addition, Inquirer reporter Mark Bowden's series on the events did not receive a Pulitzer Prize. A story Friday about Camphill Village Kimberton Hills misspelled the name of the philanthropist Mabel Pew Myrin.
NEWS
April 14, 2000 | Signe Wilkinson
Joel Pett - one of the cartoonists who we run regularly on these pages - is an irritable guy. Injustice irritates him. Gun lobbyists irritate him. Cartoons that don't have a point of view irritate him. His gift is in being able to translate irritation into funny and pointed visual commentary. We would have been irritable if Joel hadn't won the Pulitzer Prize for editorial cartooning on Monday - but he did, and we're thrilled. Here are three of the 20 cartoons from his winning Pulitzer entry.
NEWS
January 29, 1988 | BY PETE DEXTER
There were two letters - one labeled a "statement" - in the New York Times Book Review Sunday, signed by 48 black writers and critics, lobbying to get Toni Morrison a Pulitzer Prize for her 1987 novel "Beloved". Toni Morrison, as you may know, is black, and she is a wonderful American novelist. But even so, open politicking in the most influential book review in the world to get her an award seems insulting both to Morrison's art - which does not need a citation to verify it - and to the great tradition of the Pulitzer Prize.
NEWS
July 7, 1993 | By Carol Horner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Harrison E. Salisbury, 84, a towering figure in American journalism whose groundbreaking writing about the Soviet Union won him the 1955 Pulitzer Prize, died at mid-day Monday as he and his wife were driving home after a weekend with friends on Martha's Vineyard. Mr. Salisbury, longtime New York Times reporter and editor and the author of numerous books, died instantly from a stroke or a heart attack, according to his son Stephan, a reporter at The Inquirer. Stephan Salisbury said his step-mother, Charlotte, was driving when his father died near Providence, R.I. The couple were on their way to their home in Taconic, Conn.
NEWS
September 21, 2010
Wallace Turner, 89, a tenacious investigative reporter who won a Pulitzer Prize in 1957 with the Portland Oregonian and later became a bureau chief in San Francisco and Seattle for the New York Times, died Saturday in Springfield, Ore., of complications from old age, said his daughter Kathy. Mr. Turner and fellow Oregonian reporter William Lambert shared the Pulitzer for local reporting for their examination of corruption involving Portland officials and the Teamsters union. He worked for the Times as a writer and bureau chief in San Francisco and Seattle from 1962 until his retirement in the late 1980s.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
  After winning a Pulitzer Prize last week for his second book of poetry, Digest , Gregory Pardlo, Philly born and Willingboro-raised, says he's still a little delirious. "Each day I wake up thinking, ' Man, that was a weird dream,' " Pardlo says. He heard the news in an ordinary setting: while waiting for his 10-year-old daughter after school. He got a congratulatory text message, and he thought it was for the Hurston-Wright Legacy Award he'd been nominated for a few weeks prior.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra has a rather plastic idea of the concert format these days. On Wednesday night, that meant a hybrid of the talk-and-play concerts it has done under various names over the last two decades, plus offering the LiveNote app that allows the audience to follow real-time program notes on mobile devices. The start time was earlier than usual (6:30 p.m.), and tickets a flat $45 for an intermission-less concert of about 75 minutes. It would be hard to say the format struck a chord with ticket buyers, given the audience in the low hundreds that turned out in Verizon Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2015 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
When, in 1993, the body of an American soldier was dragged, beaten and bloodied, through the streets of Mogadishu in Somalia, Paul Watson photographed the horror, winning the Pulitzer Prize for the picture. He believes the dead soldier said to him, "If you do this, I will own you forever. " That haunting has, apparently, endured to this day, recorded in Watson's memoir, Where War Lives, and in Dan O'Brien's play The Body of an American , at the Wilma Theater until Feb. 1. The play concerns war and Watson's belief that war lives inside us. So rather than indict the inhumanity of those who inflict the misery, the play's documentary style becomes a kind of travelogue of suffering: Rwanda, Somalia, Iraq, Philippines, Afghanistan, Bosnia, Syria.
NEWS
December 3, 2014
ISSUE | BLAME GAME Objectionable view Miami Herald political cartoonist Jim Morin's cartoon (Nov. 30) depicting the soon-to-be-Republican-controlled Senate as having a "hate Obama" mantra was beyond deplorable, even for The Inquirer. Really, the constant barrage of half-baked, sophomoric attempts at political humor, most if not all at the expense of Republicans, is getting quite old. I'd love to put on my rose-colored glasses and pretend that this isn't the worst presidency America has ever seen and that it's all the Republicans' fault because they hate Obama.
NEWS
September 16, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tony Auth, 72, of Wynnewood, the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist and mainstay of The Inquirer's editorial page for four decades before resigning in 2012 to become a digital artist, has died. Mr. Auth had been under treatment for metastatic brain cancer. David Leopold, his friend and curator, said he died at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania on Sunday, Sept. 14, four days after his supporters had announced a fund-raising effort for an archive devoted to his work at Temple University.
NEWS
April 20, 2014
A corner of Bucks forever Abbie Reading about Abbie Hoffman took me back 25 years to when I was working on the construction of the Point Pleasant pumping station ("A radical life," April 13). With the TV cameras gone, Hoffman and the protesters chaining themselves to the main gate was but a distant memory on the day word of his death came to the nearly completed project. I was doing a concrete patch in a dark corner of the basement, and in the wet cement I etched "RIP Abbie Hoffman" with the date and crossed out the "PUMP" logo.
NEWS
April 17, 2014
'Architecture critic" doesn't fully describe the occupation of Inga Saffron, who on Monday was awarded a Pulitzer Prize for criticism, the 20th of journalism's most prestigious honors presented to The Inquirer. Perhaps "protector of the public's right to live, work, and recreate in buildings and surroundings that are functional, visually appealing, and safe" would be a better description. That might be a bit long for a byline, but it's accurate. Saffron has noted precisely when the public should be alarmed and why. After a botched demolition left six people dead inside a Salvation Army thrift shop, she observed that "Richard Basciano and the late Samuel A. Rappaport were friends, business partners, and slumlords.
NEWS
April 16, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Inga Saffron grew up in Levittown, N.Y., the model of modern, mass-produced suburban communities. But as a journalist, she developed a passion for cities. As a foreign correspondent, she recalled witnessing the devastating shelling of the "beautiful, ancient" metropolis of Sarajevo in 1992 that started the war in Bosnia. But, she observed, cities also could be ruined by bad decisions made by leaders. Saffron, now architecture critic for The Inquirer, "wanted to write about cities being rebuilt," she said.
NEWS
April 16, 2014 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
INGA SAFFRON had a plan, and it didn't involve winning the highest honor in American journalism. But the Inquirer's architecture writer took one for the team about 3 p.m. yesterday when she bagged the 20th Pulitzer Prize in the newspaper's history. "I was slipping out quietly to cook, when people started coming over to my desk," Saffron said of the foiled plan to slink away unnoticed to prepare a Passover seder for 10 people. Those dang Pulitzers. Get handed out at the most inconvenient times.
NEWS
March 15, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most people heard of Joaquin Rivera only when he died - slumped in a Philadelphia hospital emergency room while waiting for treatment that never came, then robbed of his watch by three drug addicts. But others knew him for decades before that, as a compassionate high school counselor, accomplished musician, and devoted activist who worked to help others find their way forward. Last month, a new theatrical production opened in New York, written by a Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright who found in Rivera the inspiration for her work.
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