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Pulitzer Prize

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NEWS
April 16, 2014 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
INGA SAFFRON had a plan, and it didn't involve winning the highest honor in American journalism. But the Inquirer's architecture writer took one for the team about 3 p.m. yesterday when she bagged the 20th Pulitzer Prize in the newspaper's history. "I was slipping out quietly to cook, when people started coming over to my desk," Saffron said of the foiled plan to slink away unnoticed to prepare a Passover seder for 10 people. Those dang Pulitzers. Get handed out at the most inconvenient times.
NEWS
April 13, 1990 | By Sydney Trent, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Inquirer yesterday won a Pulitzer Prize gold medal for public service for articles by reporter Gilbert M. Gaul exposing lax federal regulation of the blood industry. The medal honored a five-part investigative series, "The Blood Brokers," last fall by Gaul, 38, a business reporter who has covered health economics for The Inquirer since 1983. Another public-service award went to the Washington (N.C.) Daily News for stories revealing that the city's water supply was contaminated by carcinogens.
NEWS
April 8, 1992 | By Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER The Associated Press contributed to this article
Signe Wilkinson of the Philadelphia Daily News won the 1992 Pulitzer Prize for editorial cartooning yesterday, and in a champagne-soaked speech, she thanked some of her suppliers: Saddam Hussein, President Bush, Clarence Thomas, Alan Simpson and "the divine" Ted Kennedy. Called the "attack Quaker" by colleagues, Wilkinson is the first woman to win journalism's highest honor for editorial cartoonists. While acknowledging the importance of political subjects, she said that she tends to mine social issues for cartoons - matters like schools, neighborhood life and "what people are up against day in and day out. " Addressing a staff feasting on hoagies, cookies and the bubbly, Wilkinson peeled back the dark blue lapels of her personalized Daily News jump suit and showed off her "Republican pearls.
NEWS
April 16, 2010
CONGRATULATIONS TO Wendy Ruderman and Barbara Laker for winning the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting for the "Tainted Justice" series! It was courageous reporting that was necessary. Honest officers have nothing to worry about. Dishonest ones, beware, you will be exposed. Shawna Holts Philadelphia
NEWS
October 6, 2013
A story Friday on a service honoring Staff Sgt. Randall Shughart, a Pennsylvanian killed in a 1993 battle in Somalia, misstated how many Pennsylvanians died in that battle. Sgt. First Class Earl Fillmore Jr., 28, of Blairsville, also died. In addition, Inquirer reporter Mark Bowden's series on the events did not receive a Pulitzer Prize. A story Friday about Camphill Village Kimberton Hills misspelled the name of the philanthropist Mabel Pew Myrin.
NEWS
April 14, 2000 | Signe Wilkinson
Joel Pett - one of the cartoonists who we run regularly on these pages - is an irritable guy. Injustice irritates him. Gun lobbyists irritate him. Cartoons that don't have a point of view irritate him. His gift is in being able to translate irritation into funny and pointed visual commentary. We would have been irritable if Joel hadn't won the Pulitzer Prize for editorial cartooning on Monday - but he did, and we're thrilled. Here are three of the 20 cartoons from his winning Pulitzer entry.
NEWS
January 29, 1988 | BY PETE DEXTER
There were two letters - one labeled a "statement" - in the New York Times Book Review Sunday, signed by 48 black writers and critics, lobbying to get Toni Morrison a Pulitzer Prize for her 1987 novel "Beloved". Toni Morrison, as you may know, is black, and she is a wonderful American novelist. But even so, open politicking in the most influential book review in the world to get her an award seems insulting both to Morrison's art - which does not need a citation to verify it - and to the great tradition of the Pulitzer Prize.
NEWS
July 7, 1993 | By Carol Horner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Harrison E. Salisbury, 84, a towering figure in American journalism whose groundbreaking writing about the Soviet Union won him the 1955 Pulitzer Prize, died at mid-day Monday as he and his wife were driving home after a weekend with friends on Martha's Vineyard. Mr. Salisbury, longtime New York Times reporter and editor and the author of numerous books, died instantly from a stroke or a heart attack, according to his son Stephan, a reporter at The Inquirer. Stephan Salisbury said his step-mother, Charlotte, was driving when his father died near Providence, R.I. The couple were on their way to their home in Taconic, Conn.
NEWS
September 21, 2010
Wallace Turner, 89, a tenacious investigative reporter who won a Pulitzer Prize in 1957 with the Portland Oregonian and later became a bureau chief in San Francisco and Seattle for the New York Times, died Saturday in Springfield, Ore., of complications from old age, said his daughter Kathy. Mr. Turner and fellow Oregonian reporter William Lambert shared the Pulitzer for local reporting for their examination of corruption involving Portland officials and the Teamsters union. He worked for the Times as a writer and bureau chief in San Francisco and Seattle from 1962 until his retirement in the late 1980s.
NEWS
February 14, 2016
Artists nominated for classical Grammys with ties to Philadelphia groups or institutions: Best Opera Recording Mozart: Die Entführung Aus Dem Serail Chamber Orchestra of Europe (Deutsche Grammophon). Philadelphia Orchestra conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin leads; he has had a partnership with DG since 2012. Best Classical Instrumental Solo Rachmaninov Variations The Philadelphia Orchestra and pianist Daniil Trifonov (Deutsche Grammophon). Best Classical Composition Andrew Norman: Play Gil Rose and the Boston Modern Orchestra Project (BMOP/Sound)
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Chris Brown: I, monster Like they say, there's no such thing as bad P.R. Chris Brown uses his 2009 assault of then-gf Rihanna as fodder in his forthcoming feature film autobiography, Welcome to My Life: The Official Chris Brown Documentary . "I went from being on top of the world . . . to being Public Enemy No. 1," Brown crows in the doc, claiming it's "the first time I get to say anything" about the event. "I felt like a [bleeping] monster. I was thinking about suicide.
NEWS
April 20, 2016
Journalism Public service: The Associated Press, for a series of articles documenting the use of slave labor in the commercial seafood industry in Indonesia and Thailand. Breaking news reporting: Los Angeles Times staff, for coverage of the San Bernardino massacre and the ensuing investigation. Investigative reporting: Leonora LaPeter Anton and Anthony Cormier, of the Tampa Bay Times, and Michael Braga, of the Sarasota Herald-Tribune, for a project on escalating violence and neglect in Florida mental hospitals.
NEWS
March 20, 2016
The Abundance By Annie Dillard Ecco. 304 pp. $25.99 Reviewed by Dawn Fallik Annie Dillard is not a quick read. Her writing jumps and twists and streams, and it's up to you to filter her words slowly and find meaning. Annie Dillard is not a simple read. It seems that way at first. She will spell things out for you, but then you've got to assemble the parts. And in her new collection of old essays, The Abundance , Annie Dillard is not for the surface fish.
NEWS
March 6, 2016
While the City Slept A Love Lost to Violence and a Young Man's Descent into Madness By Eli Sanders Viking. 336 pp. $28 Reviewed by Glen Macnow On a warm July night in 2009, three lives collided in a working-class Seattle neighborhood. Teresa Butz and her fiancée, Jennifer Hopper, were at home planning their future when a 23-year-old man in a psychotic spiral broke in through an open window. Over the next few hours, Isaiah Kalebu raped and then stabbed both women, eventually killing Butz, who tried to escape by diving through a second-story glass window.
NEWS
February 24, 2016 | By Jeff Gammage, Staff Writer
Hundreds gathered at a Germantown church Monday to say farewell to the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Acel Moore, celebrate his life, and honor his lasting impact on the Philadelphia region. Husband, father, brother, writer, editor, soldier, mentor, artist, inspiration, advocate for justice and newsroom diversity - he was that and more, friends said, an indomitable and, it seemed, permanent presence among those who knew and loved him. At Grace Baptist Church, tears flowed. And stories, too - about how Moore traversed boundaries of color and age to change people's lives.
NEWS
February 14, 2016
Artists nominated for classical Grammys with ties to Philadelphia groups or institutions: Best Opera Recording Mozart: Die Entführung Aus Dem Serail Chamber Orchestra of Europe (Deutsche Grammophon). Philadelphia Orchestra conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin leads; he has had a partnership with DG since 2012. Best Classical Instrumental Solo Rachmaninov Variations The Philadelphia Orchestra and pianist Daniil Trifonov (Deutsche Grammophon). Best Classical Composition Andrew Norman: Play Gil Rose and the Boston Modern Orchestra Project (BMOP/Sound)
NEWS
November 20, 2015 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Writer Ta-Nehisi Coates, whose vibrant best-seller, Between the World and Me , was lauded in The Inquirer last month as a work of "uncompromising power" - "part memoir, part jeremiad, and part prose poem" - won the National Book Award for nonfiction Wednesday night at a banquet in New York. Adam Johnson, a winner of the Pulitzer Prize in 2013 for The Orphan Master's Son, his novel about North Korea, won the fiction prize for Fortune Smiles , a collection of short stories.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania's Kleinman Center for Energy Policy announced Monday that it will bestow its inaugural $25,000 Carnot Prize on Daniel Yergin, the energy historian. Yergin, vice chairman of the research firm IHS, will receive the prize Oct. 12 at the official opening of the center's new space in Penn's Fisher Fine Arts Library. The prize recognizes "distinguished contributions to energy policy. " The Kleinman Center, which is associated with Penn's School of Design, was established last year.
NEWS
August 8, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
People here knew Dorothy Storck as an Inquirer reporter whose syndicated columns reached hundreds of thousands of readers across the nation in the 1970s. But she was, and did, much more, both before and after that time - a strong, swashbuckling presence who embraced life and its challenges. Ms. Storck, 88, of Chicago, died at home late Sunday, Aug. 2, after a five-year battle with cancer. In the 1950s, she joined the military and commanded an Air Force squadron, a link in the chain of her military family.
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