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Pulitzer Prize

NEWS
May 14, 2010
The crack reporting team of Barbara Laker and Wendy Ruderman, fresh from winning this year's Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting, have hauled in another big award. The Daily News reporters have been announced as the winners of the Clark Mollenhoff Award for Excellence in Investigative Reporting for their series, "Tainted Justice. " The award, given by the Institute on Political Journalism, carries a $5,000 prize. It will be presented June 30 at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. The "Tainted Justice" series, which exposed rogue narcotics cops in the Philadelphia Police Department, has won numerous other honors in addition to the Pulitzer.
NEWS
April 16, 2010
CONGRATULATIONS TO Wendy Ruderman and Barbara Laker for winning the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting for the "Tainted Justice" series! It was courageous reporting that was necessary. Honest officers have nothing to worry about. Dishonest ones, beware, you will be exposed. Shawna Holts Philadelphia
NEWS
December 27, 2009 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was as if a rock star were standing a few feet in front of Alex Palmer, not a balding, soft-spoken man in a cardigan and sensible shoes. "I've never actually met a composer," said an excited Palmer, 15, motioning toward Aaron Jay Kernis, the musical celebrity in question. "I got to pick his brain. " For aspiring musicians at Palmer's South Philadelphia public school, the Girard Academic Music Program, it was a once-in-a-lifetime chance to learn from a legend. Kernis, born in Philadelphia and raised in Olney and Bensalem, is a Pulitzer Prize winner whose works are performed around the world.
NEWS
April 5, 2005 | By Frederick Cusick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jim MacMillan, a longtime Philadelphia Daily News photographer who took a year off from the paper to work as a combat photographer for the Associated Press in Iraq, won a Pulitzer Prize yesterday. MacMillan, 44, was among 11 AP photographers who won the Pulitzer Prize for Spot News Photography for their coverage of the war in Iraq. The AP group won for a submission of 20 photos taken in 2004 that showed the carnage, the bravery, and the costs of the conflict. The photos varied from pictures of an Iraqi child in his coffin to an Iraqi insurgent executing an Iraqi election worker to a burning U.S. humvee.
NEWS
March 18, 2005 | By Kera Ritter INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kathleen Rowley, 80, of Collingdale, an award-winning journalist and Fulbright scholar, died Sunday at Delaware County Memorial Hospital in Drexel Hill. Miss Rowley grew up in Collingdale and began her 36-year journalism career at age 18 as a "copy boy" for The Inquirer. She later became a general-assignment reporter and police reporter at the Courier-Post in South Jersey. "She was one of the few women reporters in the newsroom who worked hard news instead of features," said Renee Winkler, a Courier-Post reporter who covers courts.
NEWS
December 11, 2002 | By Carrie Budoff INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Paul Vathis, 77, a Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer who spent the last half-century chronicling presidents, sports figures, and Pennsylvania public officials for the Associated Press, died in his sleep yesterday at his Mechanicsburg home. A Marine Corps veteran who learned his skill aboard a World War II bomber, photographing wreckage that the aircraft left behind, Vathis was best-known for his poignant shot of President John F. Kennedy with former President Dwight D. Eisenhower at Camp David in 1961.
LIVING
December 24, 2000 | By Roger K. Miller, FOR THE INQUIRER
In an early Bill Mauldin cartoon, five soldiers are crowded around a puny fire in the snow. One is holding a Very flare pistol pointed skyward while another reads from Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol and says, "Corp'l Ginnis an' his Very pistol will now contribute the Star o' Bethlehem. " That was the soldiers' Christmas to Mauldin, interpreter of World War II GIs to themselves - an occasion for hardy sentimentality. Christmastime in wartime meant not comfort, but the lack of it. A later cartoon, published on Christmas Day (and reprinted in Up Front, Mauldin's enduring World War II classic)
NEWS
April 14, 2000 | Signe Wilkinson
Joel Pett - one of the cartoonists who we run regularly on these pages - is an irritable guy. Injustice irritates him. Gun lobbyists irritate him. Cartoons that don't have a point of view irritate him. His gift is in being able to translate irritation into funny and pointed visual commentary. We would have been irritable if Joel hadn't won the Pulitzer Prize for editorial cartooning on Monday - but he did, and we're thrilled. Here are three of the 20 cartoons from his winning Pulitzer entry.
LIVING
July 27, 1999 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
President John Kennedy at one point tried to get the New York Times to pull its correspondent David Halberstam out of Vietnam. "I remember thinking, 'That's odd, why would he do that?' It didn't make me feel angry with him," Halberstam says. "I think it was irritation. . . . [Kennedy] wanted Vietnam to be on the back burner. He wanted to run for a second term and beat Goldwater, and then figure out what to do for his second term. He told Arthur Schlesinger, 'I can find out more stuff from his stories than I can from the admirals and generals.
NEWS
May 11, 1999 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist and author Anna Quindlen has withdrawn as the commencement speaker at Villanova University this Sunday because of what she said were objections by a "vocal minority" to her support of abortion rights. Quindlen, who was also to have received an honorary doctorate of humane letters, said in an interview yesterday that she did not want to "ruin the day or cast a shadow" on the graduation ceremony. Antiabortion activists had planned to protest her appearance by walking out of the commencement ceremonies at the start of her address.
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