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Pulitzer Prize

NEWS
April 18, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
Now that hands have been shaken, hugs shared, congratulations extended, and champagne imbibed, Philadelphians not in the newspaper business may want to take a moment to ask what it means to them that The Inquirer has won journalism's top award — the Pulitzer Prize for Public Service. It is a tribute to any city to have an award-winner, but virtually every town with a Pulitzer recipient also has a problem that the newspaper or online publication revealed. In the case of The Inquirer's 19th Pulitzer, a team of reporters, editors, photographers, and videographers pointed out the prevalence of violence in Philadelphia's schools.
NEWS
April 18, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
You'd think that literature itself had died, the way the literati reacted to Monday's news that the Pulitzer Prize board had withheld its award for fiction for the first time in 35 years. Were there no good novels this year, or where there too many to choose from? Was this a message to the publishing world? A statement about the state of American letters? The 18-member board said it simply failed to reach a majority vote on a winner, rebuffing the year's three finalists - Denis Johnson ( Train Dreams )
NEWS
April 17, 2012 | Associated Press
NEW YORK - The Associated Press won a Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting Monday for documenting the New York Police Department's widespread spying on Muslims, while the Patriot-News in Harrisburg, Pa. - and in particular, 24-year-old reporter Sara Ganim - were honored for local reporting that broke the Penn State sexual abuse scandal. David Wood of the Huffington Post won for national reporting for a look at the suffering endured by American veterans wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2012 | By John Timpane, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
‘Unbeknownst to all of us, she was observing all the time, everyone and everything. " Philadelphia Councilwoman María Quiñones-Sánchez is talking about her step-niece, Quiara Alegría Hudes, a true daughter of West Philly who won the Pulitzer Prize for drama on Monday. Hudes, 34, won for her play Water by the Spoonful , a tale of a soldier's return from war, life at a Philly sandwich shop, and the struggle with addiction. David Rooney of the Hollywood Reporter called the win "an upset that went against industry predictions.
NEWS
April 17, 2012 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Inquirer's investigation of the climate of pervasive violence in Philadelphia's public schools on Monday won the Pulitzer Prize for public service, the profession's most prestigious honor. The award is the 19th Pulitzer Prize for the 183-year-old newspaper and its first since 1997. The seven-part series, "Assault on Learning," revealed that violence in city schools was widespread and underreported, with 30,000 serious incidents over the last five school years. Those findings were later corroborated by a Philadelphia School District panel on safety, spurred an overhaul of incident reporting in the district, and prompted hiring of a state-funded safe-schools advocate.
NEWS
March 5, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer
WHAT I remember most was the voice. Bayard Brunt's voice was a flat monotone - with a touch of gravel to give it more character - and weighted with a kind of suppressed menace. You wouldn't have wanted to be on the wrong side of that voice. That voice told you that the man behind it wasn't going to take any of your crap. You'd better level with him or you'd regret it. As a reporter and rewrite man for the old Evening Bulletin , Bayard was the kind of reporter they used to make legends about.
NEWS
February 19, 2012 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
In April, the prize-winning New York Times correspondent Anthony Shadid was asked, on the NPR talk show On Point , why he kept taking terrible risks to cover conflicts in the Middle East. "I kind of wonder if it's irresponsible of you," a caller mused out loud. "Why would someone put themselves in such a situation?" Shadid, in his typically modest fashion, admitted this was "a perfectly legitimate question. " Then he replied slowly, "I felt that if I wasn't there, the story wouldn't be told.
NEWS
June 13, 2011 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
Until New City Stage Company's current effort, Marsha Norman's 'Night, Mother - the 1983 drama about a daughter's impending suicide - had never had a professional Philadelphia production. This Pulitzer Prize-winner seems just the sort of small-scale, emotionally charged piece companies wishing to highlight a pair of their favorite actresses would have sourced over and over. Another surprise: Though it has counted plenty of big names among its staged or filmed cast members throughout the years - Kathy Bates, Sissy Spacek, Anne Bancroft, Brenda Blethyn, Edie Falco - as far as I can tell, this is the first version performed by African American actors.
NEWS
May 16, 2011
Jack Jones, 86, a longtime Los Angeles Times reporter who was part of a team that shared the 1966 Pulitzer Prize for the newspaper's coverage of the Watts riots and their aftermath, died of lung disease Thursday at his Oceanside, Calif., home. The Times received the Pulitzer for local reporting for its coverage of the several days of bloodshed and destruction during the Watts riots in August 1965 and for a follow-up series that ran the following October. When order was restored, Times reporters returned to the community to gauge "The View From Watts," a series of several articles that ran under Jones' byline.
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