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Pulitzer Prize

NEWS
December 11, 2002 | By Carrie Budoff INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Paul Vathis, 77, a Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer who spent the last half-century chronicling presidents, sports figures, and Pennsylvania public officials for the Associated Press, died in his sleep yesterday at his Mechanicsburg home. A Marine Corps veteran who learned his skill aboard a World War II bomber, photographing wreckage that the aircraft left behind, Vathis was best-known for his poignant shot of President John F. Kennedy with former President Dwight D. Eisenhower at Camp David in 1961.
LIVING
December 24, 2000 | By Roger K. Miller, FOR THE INQUIRER
In an early Bill Mauldin cartoon, five soldiers are crowded around a puny fire in the snow. One is holding a Very flare pistol pointed skyward while another reads from Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol and says, "Corp'l Ginnis an' his Very pistol will now contribute the Star o' Bethlehem. " That was the soldiers' Christmas to Mauldin, interpreter of World War II GIs to themselves - an occasion for hardy sentimentality. Christmastime in wartime meant not comfort, but the lack of it. A later cartoon, published on Christmas Day (and reprinted in Up Front, Mauldin's enduring World War II classic)
NEWS
April 14, 2000 | Signe Wilkinson
Joel Pett - one of the cartoonists who we run regularly on these pages - is an irritable guy. Injustice irritates him. Gun lobbyists irritate him. Cartoons that don't have a point of view irritate him. His gift is in being able to translate irritation into funny and pointed visual commentary. We would have been irritable if Joel hadn't won the Pulitzer Prize for editorial cartooning on Monday - but he did, and we're thrilled. Here are three of the 20 cartoons from his winning Pulitzer entry.
LIVING
July 27, 1999 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
President John Kennedy at one point tried to get the New York Times to pull its correspondent David Halberstam out of Vietnam. "I remember thinking, 'That's odd, why would he do that?' It didn't make me feel angry with him," Halberstam says. "I think it was irritation. . . . [Kennedy] wanted Vietnam to be on the back burner. He wanted to run for a second term and beat Goldwater, and then figure out what to do for his second term. He told Arthur Schlesinger, 'I can find out more stuff from his stories than I can from the admirals and generals.
NEWS
May 11, 1999 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist and author Anna Quindlen has withdrawn as the commencement speaker at Villanova University this Sunday because of what she said were objections by a "vocal minority" to her support of abortion rights. Quindlen, who was also to have received an honorary doctorate of humane letters, said in an interview yesterday that she did not want to "ruin the day or cast a shadow" on the graduation ceremony. Antiabortion activists had planned to protest her appearance by walking out of the commencement ceremonies at the start of her address.
NEWS
April 20, 1999 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One day last year, camera in hand, Rodney Robinson "was just looking around the neighborhood, trying to find anything that somebody was doing. " Then the Philadelphia teen heard the clink of metal on macadam, looked underneath a car, and saw a mechanic on his back, busy at work. That would make a good picture, he thought. How good, Robinson could not have imagined. But on April 12, the Pulitzer Prize committee sent its kudos to 14-year-old Robinson and 10 other former Penn Treaty Middle School students who took pictures of their Kensington neighborhood as part of an eighth-grade social-studies project to capture history in the making.
LIVING
April 14, 1999 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You're a composer. You're working at home one day, writing at the keyboard with headsets on. The phone keeps ringing, and, after considerable annoyance, you finally pick up. How does it feel to learn that you've suddenly joined the ranks of Aaron Copland, Charles Ives and Wynton Marsalis? Ask Melinda Wagner, who Monday became the 58th American composer to win the Pulitzer Prize. "As a matter of fact, I'm a little worried today," Wagner, 42, said yesterday from her home in Ridgewood, N.J., "because I need to get back to work.
LIVING
November 18, 1997 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's been a rough couple of weeks for presidents. First, news accounts bring us Richard Nixon, swathed again in his Oval Office tapes, casually talking about shaking down the dairy lobby and raffling off ambassadorships like so many Thanksgiving turkeys. Then we hear Lyndon Johnson, tangled in tapes of his own, confiding to his national security adviser that any war in Vietnam is a complete loser for the United States. "I don't think it's worth fighting for," concludes Johnson, in a conversation recorded in May 1964 - the far side of 50,000 American body bags.
NEWS
April 8, 1997 | By Mark Davis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three Inquirer staff members yesterday won journalism's highest honor, the Pulitzer Prize, for a five-part series chronicling how critically ill patients and their families confronted death. Michael Vitez, who covers aging for the newspaper, and photographers April Saul and Ron Cortes were named winners of the Pulitzer for explanatory journalism for the Nov. 17-21 series "Final Choices. " The Inquirer joined the Associated Press, plus newspapers in Baltimore, New York and Long Island, N.Y., for excellence in covering diverse topics ranging from the Flight 800 explosion to a portrait of a baseball umpire battling personal tragedy.
NEWS
February 2, 1997 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele, The Inquirer's nationally acclaimed team of investigative reporters, are leaving the newspaper after 26 years to work for media giant Time Warner. Barlett and Steele, who have reported on such topics as nuclear waste disposal, federal tax policy, the energy crisis, American foreign aid and housing fraud, said Friday that they will write for various Time Inc. magazines and hope to branch out into television documentaries. "This is a rare, extraordinary opportunity," said Steele.
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