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Pulitzer Prize

NEWS
May 11, 1999 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist and author Anna Quindlen has withdrawn as the commencement speaker at Villanova University this Sunday because of what she said were objections by a "vocal minority" to her support of abortion rights. Quindlen, who was also to have received an honorary doctorate of humane letters, said in an interview yesterday that she did not want to "ruin the day or cast a shadow" on the graduation ceremony. Antiabortion activists had planned to protest her appearance by walking out of the commencement ceremonies at the start of her address.
NEWS
April 20, 1999 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One day last year, camera in hand, Rodney Robinson "was just looking around the neighborhood, trying to find anything that somebody was doing. " Then the Philadelphia teen heard the clink of metal on macadam, looked underneath a car, and saw a mechanic on his back, busy at work. That would make a good picture, he thought. How good, Robinson could not have imagined. But on April 12, the Pulitzer Prize committee sent its kudos to 14-year-old Robinson and 10 other former Penn Treaty Middle School students who took pictures of their Kensington neighborhood as part of an eighth-grade social-studies project to capture history in the making.
LIVING
April 14, 1999 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You're a composer. You're working at home one day, writing at the keyboard with headsets on. The phone keeps ringing, and, after considerable annoyance, you finally pick up. How does it feel to learn that you've suddenly joined the ranks of Aaron Copland, Charles Ives and Wynton Marsalis? Ask Melinda Wagner, who Monday became the 58th American composer to win the Pulitzer Prize. "As a matter of fact, I'm a little worried today," Wagner, 42, said yesterday from her home in Ridgewood, N.J., "because I need to get back to work.
LIVING
November 18, 1997 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's been a rough couple of weeks for presidents. First, news accounts bring us Richard Nixon, swathed again in his Oval Office tapes, casually talking about shaking down the dairy lobby and raffling off ambassadorships like so many Thanksgiving turkeys. Then we hear Lyndon Johnson, tangled in tapes of his own, confiding to his national security adviser that any war in Vietnam is a complete loser for the United States. "I don't think it's worth fighting for," concludes Johnson, in a conversation recorded in May 1964 - the far side of 50,000 American body bags.
NEWS
April 8, 1997 | By Mark Davis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three Inquirer staff members yesterday won journalism's highest honor, the Pulitzer Prize, for a five-part series chronicling how critically ill patients and their families confronted death. Michael Vitez, who covers aging for the newspaper, and photographers April Saul and Ron Cortes were named winners of the Pulitzer for explanatory journalism for the Nov. 17-21 series "Final Choices. " The Inquirer joined the Associated Press, plus newspapers in Baltimore, New York and Long Island, N.Y., for excellence in covering diverse topics ranging from the Flight 800 explosion to a portrait of a baseball umpire battling personal tragedy.
NEWS
February 2, 1997 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele, The Inquirer's nationally acclaimed team of investigative reporters, are leaving the newspaper after 26 years to work for media giant Time Warner. Barlett and Steele, who have reported on such topics as nuclear waste disposal, federal tax policy, the energy crisis, American foreign aid and housing fraud, said Friday that they will write for various Time Inc. magazines and hope to branch out into television documentaries. "This is a rare, extraordinary opportunity," said Steele.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1996 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The Steinway in George Walker's music room is 9 feet long, the studio only a few feet longer. Components for digital recording edge every available wall. When George Walker is playing his piano, there's no room for anyone to listen. This narrow room is a big chunk of Walker's world. Night after night at his home in this placid residential neighborhood, the composer makes records - as both performer and engineer. He tried having his son operate the equipment, Walker says with a smile, but "the room is so small, his presence became intrusive.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1995 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The touring producion of Angels in America, the celebrated two-part work that won a Pulitzer Prize and two Tony Awards for best play, will come to two Philadelphia theaters in November. An unusual production arrangement will put the play by Tony Kushner in the Zellerbach Theatre of the Annenberg Center, 3680 Walnut St., from Nov. 7-12 and in the Merriam Theater, 250 S. Broad St., from Nov. 14-19. Angels in America will be part of a 1995-96 season at the Merriam that also includes Chita Rivera's reprising of her Tony Award-winning role in Kiss of the Spider Woman; Hal Holbrook in a revival of Death of a Salesman; and the acclaimed 50th-anniversary revival of the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical Carousel.
NEWS
April 20, 1995 | BY ANN GERHART Daily News wire services, the New York Post and New York Daily News contributed to this report
Roxanne Pulitzer appears poised to marry husband No. 3, as soon as he extricates himself from his wife of 27 years. Her intended is a wealthy German developer who owns hundreds of acres of valuable Palm Beach property. Harold Duda is regarded as "filthy rich - even for down here," according to socialites on the island. "We've known each other for 14 years and the romance started about four months ago. Now he's separated from his wife and the divorce should be final soon," Pulitzer told the New York Post.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1994 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You don't really want to like Anna Quindlen, the Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times columnist, bestselling novelist, and devoted wife and mother of three whose achievements seem to suggest that women can, indeed, have it all. It doesn't help that Quindlen, 42, recently turned down a shot at a top managerial job at the Times - perhaps, in time, the top job - in order to plunge full time into a promising literary career. Who among us even has such a choice? Where, one can't help wondering, have the rest of us gone wrong?
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