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Pulitzer Prize

ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1995 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The touring producion of Angels in America, the celebrated two-part work that won a Pulitzer Prize and two Tony Awards for best play, will come to two Philadelphia theaters in November. An unusual production arrangement will put the play by Tony Kushner in the Zellerbach Theatre of the Annenberg Center, 3680 Walnut St., from Nov. 7-12 and in the Merriam Theater, 250 S. Broad St., from Nov. 14-19. Angels in America will be part of a 1995-96 season at the Merriam that also includes Chita Rivera's reprising of her Tony Award-winning role in Kiss of the Spider Woman; Hal Holbrook in a revival of Death of a Salesman; and the acclaimed 50th-anniversary revival of the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical Carousel.
NEWS
April 20, 1995 | BY ANN GERHART Daily News wire services, the New York Post and New York Daily News contributed to this report
Roxanne Pulitzer appears poised to marry husband No. 3, as soon as he extricates himself from his wife of 27 years. Her intended is a wealthy German developer who owns hundreds of acres of valuable Palm Beach property. Harold Duda is regarded as "filthy rich - even for down here," according to socialites on the island. "We've known each other for 14 years and the romance started about four months ago. Now he's separated from his wife and the divorce should be final soon," Pulitzer told the New York Post.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1994 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You don't really want to like Anna Quindlen, the Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times columnist, bestselling novelist, and devoted wife and mother of three whose achievements seem to suggest that women can, indeed, have it all. It doesn't help that Quindlen, 42, recently turned down a shot at a top managerial job at the Times - perhaps, in time, the top job - in order to plunge full time into a promising literary career. Who among us even has such a choice? Where, one can't help wondering, have the rest of us gone wrong?
NEWS
July 7, 1993 | By Carol Horner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Harrison E. Salisbury, 84, a towering figure in American journalism whose groundbreaking writing about the Soviet Union won him the 1955 Pulitzer Prize, died at mid-day Monday as he and his wife were driving home after a weekend with friends on Martha's Vineyard. Mr. Salisbury, longtime New York Times reporter and editor and the author of numerous books, died instantly from a stroke or a heart attack, according to his son Stephan, a reporter at The Inquirer. Stephan Salisbury said his step-mother, Charlotte, was driving when his father died near Providence, R.I. The couple were on their way to their home in Taconic, Conn.
NEWS
April 11, 1993 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The compulsion to measure, weigh and analyze every nuance of modern life - as if a precise label might somehow enhance understanding - is perhaps what has led critics to categorize poet W. D. Snodgrass' work as "confessional. " But Snodgrass, who will appear at Ursinus College on Wednesday, is far from comfortable with the term commonly used to characterize his work. "I don't like the label at all," Snodgress said during an interview. "It's a kind of journalists' tag. I don't like it especially because it sounds like you're writing about somebody's bedroom memoirs, or about some religious confession.
NEWS
June 26, 1992 | By Carlin Romano, INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
In 1943, with World War II raging around the globe, the most famous graduate in the history of Randolph-Macon Women's College addressed a plea to her fellow alumnae. It was not a call to arms. Or against them. Instead, she implored her sisters to establish a rare book room on the school's wisteria-graced campus here. "After many years away from college, when I look to myself to discover what remains of those years," wrote Pearl Sydenstricker Buck, class of 1914 and already America's most distinguished author after winning the 1938 Nobel Prize in Literature, "I find it is atmosphere.
NEWS
June 21, 1992 | By Carol Horner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The early memories are vivid, and neither time nor pain can blur them. The son, not yet school age, spies a blue globe and anchor tattooed on the father's upper right arm, and reaches out to touch it. Later he'll learn it's the emblem of his dad's beloved Marine Corps. Kneeling in prayer at bedtime, the son invokes the names of the father's heroes: "Now I lay me down to sleep . . . and God bless Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson . . . " Standing by a parade ground on a splendid sunny day, gripping his mother's hand, the son sees the father saluted and honored, and he feels stirring within the desire to earn that glory one day himself.
NEWS
April 13, 1992 | BY ZACHARY STALBERG
Signe Wilkinson was a finalist last year for the Pulitzer Prize for editorial cartooning. That near-miss apparently made a major impression on one of Signe's young daughters. I know this because of something that happened a few months ago. The child wandered away from her babysitter as they walked through Chestnut Hill. A woman found her and asked how to contact her mother. The girl said Signe worked at the Philadelphia Daily News and was "the second best cartoonist in America.
NEWS
April 8, 1992 | Daily News Staff Report
There was George Bush, American flag fluttering on his desk, declaiming to the populace, "I am your father who art in the White House! Hollow be my name. " And there was Signe Wilkinson, the Daily News political cartoonist whose deft satirical touch has bushwhacked Bush on many another occasion, with champagne dripping from her hair. For just the kind of biting bitchiness displayed in the first panel of yesterday's political cartoon, one concerning Bush and abortion, this impertinent Quaker with a scalpel for a pen who is really a very nice lady, won the Pulitzer Prize for editorial cartooning.
NEWS
April 8, 1992 | By Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER The Associated Press contributed to this article
Signe Wilkinson of the Philadelphia Daily News won the 1992 Pulitzer Prize for editorial cartooning yesterday, and in a champagne-soaked speech, she thanked some of her suppliers: Saddam Hussein, President Bush, Clarence Thomas, Alan Simpson and "the divine" Ted Kennedy. Called the "attack Quaker" by colleagues, Wilkinson is the first woman to win journalism's highest honor for editorial cartoonists. While acknowledging the importance of political subjects, she said that she tends to mine social issues for cartoons - matters like schools, neighborhood life and "what people are up against day in and day out. " Addressing a staff feasting on hoagies, cookies and the bubbly, Wilkinson peeled back the dark blue lapels of her personalized Daily News jump suit and showed off her "Republican pearls.
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