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NEWS
June 7, 1996 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
PULP. With opening act The Drag at TLA, 334 South St., 7:30 p.m. Sunday. Tickets: $10:50 in advance, $12.50 the day of the show. Info: 215-922-1011. As an opening act last year for Blur, they watched the blokes from Manchester go down in flames - constantly (and often unfavorably) compared to that other big British band of the hour, Oasis. Now the worm's turned and that opening act (from nearby Sheffield) is headlining their first U.S. tour. They're trying their hardest to avoid being the next big thing that lasts a lunchtime.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1996 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ladies and gentlemen, the new British Invasion has finally found its showman, and his name is Jarvis Cocker. Pulp, the Sheffield, England, band led by the 6-foot-4 stickman with the foppish 'do, completed its first U.S. tour on Sunday with a sold-out show at the Theater of Living Arts. For 90 minutes, Cocker was everything his immobile countrymen in Oasis - the band Pulp deserves to follow to a mass-audience breakthrough - aren't. As his Bowiesque croon soared on one terrific post-disco pop tune after the next, Cocker pumped his pelvis, kicked like a Rockette, and acted out the lyrics with theatrical flair.
BUSINESS
January 7, 1994 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Regional Port Authority celebrated the eagerly-awaited sound of pile drivers finally sinking the foundation of a new "forest products" warehouse near Pier 78 at Delaware and Snyder avenues yesterday with a ceremony at the site. The state Legislature appropriated the money to build the warehouse six years ago, but it got stalled in lawsuits. The Legislature passed a special act last year to get the project moving. Forest products means paper, pulp and plywood - some 700,000 tons that was imported from Finland, Sweden and Great Britain last year through PRPA-owned terminals leased to Penn Trucking and Warehousing Co., according to John Brown Jr., Penn Trucking's vice president.
NEWS
July 4, 1990 | By Jeremy Kaplan, Special to The Inquirer
Once upon a time, according to Richard Greene, Americans read for entertainment. Apparently they liked it a lot, though that seems a little far- fetched in the Bart Simpson era of today. But Greene - who calls himself an archivist of American popular culture - has hard evidence of this bygone literacy: his collection of several thousand "pulp magazines. " The pulps were low-brow fiction digests that sold tens of millions of copies from the late 1800s through the early 1950s.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2006 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
One of the least prolific and most interesting of American indie filmmakers, Victor Nunez, ably adapted a John D. MacDonald thriller, A Flash of Green, in 1984. He made Ruby in Paradise, a keenly observed tale of a woman's voyage of self-discovery - introducing Ashley Judd to audiences in 1993. Four years later, Peter Fonda got an Oscar nomination for his performance in Nunez's Ulee's Gold. Like those films, Nunez's latest, Coastlines, is set in Florida - in the flat, scruffy panhandle where the beaches remain relatively undeveloped and the culture of the South hangs heavy in the air. It's an area peopled by oystermen and shrimpers, car mechanics and cops, and Nunez - who has lived there most of his life - captures the hot, loping feel of the place with a documentarian's eye. Alas, Coastlines, which owes much of its plot, and its characters, to the kind of hard-boiled crime fiction of folks like MacDonald, isn't anywhere near as good as Nunez's earlier work.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2008 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Max Payne is a junkyard dog of a film that is true to its video-game roots even as it transcends them. Irish director John Moore ( The Omen ) has fashioned an atmosphere darker than noir. His New York (a transformed Toronto) is a hellhole of back alleys, not boulevards; of deserted subway platforms, not teeming sidewalks; a place where ashy snow drifts down like endless regrets. In this bleak warren, Max Payne stews. Dressed in black and packing a firearm heftier than Dirty Harry's, he's the Ahab of the police department.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1996 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Sara Sherr, Nick Cristiano and Faith Quintavell also contributed
Jarvis Cocker realized he wanted to be a pop star when he was a wee lad growing up in Sheffield, England, in the '70s. "I knew from a very early age," says the 6-foot-4, 140-pound leader of Pulp, calling from London before the Brit-pop band of the moment plays the TLA on Sunday. "I remember watching the Osmonds' television show and Donny saying his favorite color was purple, which was the same as mine. I thought maybe I had it in me to be a pop star, too. " It took some time - Pulp was first formed in 1978 - but with Different Class (Island)
BUSINESS
February 19, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Brazilian pulp and paper company will relocate its Northeastern United States distribution center to the Tioga Marine Terminal in July, creating 228 stevedore and terminal jobs and up to 380 total jobs, including ones for rail workers and truckers. Fibria Celulose S.A., the world's largest producer of bleached eucalyptus wood pulp, will bring in from 12 to 18 ships a year to start, with 300,000 to 350,000 metric tons, for distribution to paper plants in Pennsylvania and beyond.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1986 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
From the makers of Night of the Comet comes Jake Speed, a loopy, appealing B-movie that tickles the ribs, the fancy and the combined plots of The African Queen, Remo Williams and Romancing the Stone. It also might be the first picture in 60 years (since Son of the Sheik, anyway) in which saving a blonde from the clutches of white slavers is the hero's mission. Jake Speed (Wayne Crawford, who co-wrote the screenplay) is an engagingly earnest hero whose exploits on behalf of the underdog are the stuff of pulp fiction.
BUSINESS
October 25, 1994 | By Susan Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Scott Paper Co. said yesterday it will sell off assets valued about $1 billion, including its entire pulp and timberland operations. Albert Dunlap, Scott's chairman and chief executive, said the divestitures are part of Scott's transformation from a broad-based paper manufacturer to a consumer-products company focusing on its core tissue business. Scott, after several years of financial decline, is undergoing a major restructuring led by Dunlap, who joined the company in April.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2015 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Head over to Morris Arboretum as it begins the unofficial start of summer with its Garden Railway Grand Opening. This year's theme is "Art and Architecture," featuring familiar Philadelphia landmarks - all created from nature. Miniature trains roll on a quarter mile of track through the tiny enchanted town made from natural materials such as bark, leaves, acorns, and twigs on 15 different rail lines. There's even a trestle bridge you can walk under. Look out for some familiar landmarks such as Independence Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
THERE'S A FUNNY T-shirt available for sale about the importance of punctuation. It points out the different meanings of "Let's Eat Grandma!" and "Let's Eat, Grandma!" Tattle thought of that yesterday when Rolling Stone mentioned the title of Kanye West 's next album as "So Help Me God. " All we could think of was a perhaps more accurate title, "So Help Me, God. "   The daily Cosby Bill Cosby 's lawyers asked a federal judge Friday to throw out a defamation suit filed by three women accusing the comedian of decades-old sexual offenses.
BUSINESS
February 19, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Brazilian pulp and paper company will relocate its Northeastern United States distribution center to the Tioga Marine Terminal in July, creating 228 stevedore and terminal jobs and up to 380 total jobs, including ones for rail workers and truckers. Fibria Celulose S.A., the world's largest producer of bleached eucalyptus wood pulp, will bring in from 12 to 18 ships a year to start, with 300,000 to 350,000 metric tons, for distribution to paper plants in Pennsylvania and beyond.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2008 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Max Payne is a junkyard dog of a film that is true to its video-game roots even as it transcends them. Irish director John Moore ( The Omen ) has fashioned an atmosphere darker than noir. His New York (a transformed Toronto) is a hellhole of back alleys, not boulevards; of deserted subway platforms, not teeming sidewalks; a place where ashy snow drifts down like endless regrets. In this bleak warren, Max Payne stews. Dressed in black and packing a firearm heftier than Dirty Harry's, he's the Ahab of the police department.
NEWS
April 7, 2008 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer GreenSpace Columnist
Of all the things to obsess about, toilet paper has never been at the top of my list. Or the bottom. Then I met Jeff Wells, a pleasant, earnest ornithologist who lives in Maine and was visiting Philly. Wells and a few environmental groups say I should buy paper products made from recycled paper - not trees. Now, Wells obsesses about birds, billions of which breed in Canada's boreal forest, which he also obsesses about because he's a scientist with the International Boreal Conservation Campaign.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2007 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When last we saw Tony Soprano, he was lying in a leather jacket on a bare mattress, clutching an automatic weapon like it was his last friend on the planet. All around him was whacking and chaos. Tony seemed small and vulnerable - sympathetic, even. It made us root for him to survive in tomorrow night's final episode of The Sopranos. And therein lies my problem with this unquestionably brilliant show: We like these people too much. The real Mafia - the sociopaths I grew up with in the crucible of the American Cosa Nostra in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn - are nowhere near as charming as James Gandolfini, who plays Tony.
NEWS
January 9, 2007 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's a shockingly balmy day in January. Colorfully dressed revelers are streaming down South Street to celebrate with the Mummers. This is definitely not David Goodis' Philadelphia. In 18 books, most set in his hometown, this Temple graduate captured desperate men, usually on the wrong side of the law, trying to survive in a cold, grim and unforgiving Philadelphia. On this unseasonably warm weekend, a band of writers, readers, academics and collectors are burrowed in the Society Hill Playhouse to pay tribute to this tortured and talented native son 40 years after his death.
NEWS
August 30, 2006 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joseph Stefano, 84, who after leaving Philadelphia as a young man to pursue a career in show business ended up writing the screenplay for Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho and becoming a co-creator of television's seminal science fiction anthology series The Outer Limits, died of lung cancer Friday at Los Robles Hospital in Thousand Oaks, Calif. The youngest of eight children in a poor family, Mr. Stefano grew up in South Philadelphia during the Great Depression. His mother died when he was very young, his father was usually out of work, and the family moved 13 times because they couldn't pay the rent, always staying near 20th and Snyder.
NEWS
July 28, 2006
WE ARE outraged by the July 20 "Nancy" comic strip. By making light of Nancy beating Sluggo to a pulp in a jealous rage, the strip trivializes relationship abuse and suggests that violence is an acceptable way to resolve personal disputes. Domestic violence should not be a punch line for a cheap joke. You and the strip's authors owe your readers an apology. Judy Kahan, Chief Executive Officer Center Against Domestic Violence Brooklyn, N.Y.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2006 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
One of the least prolific and most interesting of American indie filmmakers, Victor Nunez, ably adapted a John D. MacDonald thriller, A Flash of Green, in 1984. He made Ruby in Paradise, a keenly observed tale of a woman's voyage of self-discovery - introducing Ashley Judd to audiences in 1993. Four years later, Peter Fonda got an Oscar nomination for his performance in Nunez's Ulee's Gold. Like those films, Nunez's latest, Coastlines, is set in Florida - in the flat, scruffy panhandle where the beaches remain relatively undeveloped and the culture of the South hangs heavy in the air. It's an area peopled by oystermen and shrimpers, car mechanics and cops, and Nunez - who has lived there most of his life - captures the hot, loping feel of the place with a documentarian's eye. Alas, Coastlines, which owes much of its plot, and its characters, to the kind of hard-boiled crime fiction of folks like MacDonald, isn't anywhere near as good as Nunez's earlier work.
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