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Punxsutawney Phil

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NEWS
February 4, 1986 | By SCOTT HEIMER, Daily News Staff Writer
Where was Punxsutawney Phil when we needed him? Like this morning? Where was that little rascal rodent who predicted an early spring only two days ago? Probably hiding in his hole in his western Pennsylvania namesake town, just as snow was blanketing Philadelphia and its suburbs and thousands of commuters were cursing him out. The roads were mostly slushy this morning, with some icy spots in the suburbs. Bumper-thumpers and traffic delays were not infrequent. SEPTA reported some minor delays because of the weather.
NEWS
March 25, 2013 | By Amanda Lee Myers and Mark Scolforo, Associated Press
CINCINNATI - A shadow of a different kind is hanging over Punxsutawney Phil. Authorities in still-frigid Ohio have issued an "indictment" against the famed groundhog, who predicted an early spring when he didn't see his shadow after emerging from his lair in Western Pennsylvania on Feb. 2. Spring arrived Wednesday, and temperatures are still hovering in the 30s in the Buckeye state and much of the Northeast. While it's not the coldest spring on record, it's a good 5 degrees below normal, said Don Hughes, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Wilmington, Ohio.
NEWS
December 12, 2004
How much pork would a woodchuck chuck, if a woodchuck could chuck pork? Woodchucks like Punxsutawney Phil, that legendary meteorological marmot, usually don't eat meat. But that didn't stop Rep. John Peterson (R., Pa.) from lavishing $100,000 worth of federal pork on the groundhog's hometown in Peterson's district, to upgrade a weather museum. With a regularity straight out of the movie Groundhog Day, federal "earmarks" such as this one reappear each appropriations season.
NEWS
February 3, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
On Groundhog Day, one is tempted to wonder how a supersized rodent came to be a symbol of hope. Perhaps those tourists flocking to an obscure patch of Pennsylvania called Gobbler's Knob only think they've come to see a seer named Punxsutawney Phil. They may instead be acting upon a universal human yearning for community, for a respite from the isolation imposed by, say, an Arctic vortex. These Punxsutawney pilgrims may simply be expressing our communal wish for better weather.
NEWS
March 27, 2013 | By Peter Mucha, Philly.com
It's no secret that Punxsutawney Phil is a shadowy underworld figure. And yet it now looks like the dirty rat-cousin could burrow his way out of a possible death sentence in Ohio. A supposed higher-up in the Gobbler's Knob mob has stepped forward to be the fall (or winter and still-not-spring) guy. Police in Maryland, however, have yet to withdraw their "Suspect Wanted for Fraud" proclamation. Being a famous groundhog in Pennsylvania isn't such a warm and fuzzy deal anymore.
NEWS
January 16, 2002 | By Ralph Vigoda INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Uniformed troops, accompanied by a bomb-sniffing dog, will converge next month in a rural, hilly area not far from the mountains and surround an underground burrow known to harbor one of the country's most well-known creatures. The dirty work of entering the burrow, however, is going to be left to one of the experienced men, recognizable as a member of an elite special force by his outfit: a top hat and tuxedo. With the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks as a backdrop, Pennsylvania State Police and the National Guard will provide extra security for the 30,000-plus people expected to gather on Feb. 2 at Gobbler's Knob for Groundhog Day and the appearance of famous weather-prognosticator, Punxsutawney Phil.
NEWS
February 2, 1996 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If the good folks of Punxsutawney wanted to do the decent thing, they would leave poor Phil alone this morning. When the groundhog is yanked out of his climate-controlled burrow at daybreak today to continue a 100-year tradition, the weather in Punxsutawney is expected to bear a remarkable resemblance to Philadelphia's. That is, frigid and snowy. Legend has it that if the groundhog sees its shadow, that means six more weeks of winter. No matter what Phil sees, however, forecasters said Philadelphia would probably get at least six more inches of snow today and tomorrow, followed by several more days of cold.
NEWS
January 13, 1987
The peaceful folks of Punxsutawney are ready for the 100th anniversary of Punxsutawney Phil's prognosticating. For a century, Punxsutawnians - and those who wish they were - have treked to Gobblers' Knob to greet the appearance of Phil, whose shadow (or lack thereof) heralds the continuation (or abatement) of winter. In honor of this year's centennial, Punxsutawney is pulling out all the stops. Extra paper placemats have been printed up for use at Punxsy Phil's Steak and Cake and final arrangements are being made for the Groundhog poetry and trivia contests.
NEWS
February 3, 1987 | By Annemarie Draham, Special to The Inquirer
Despite pleas for mercy from a winter-weary crowd of 5,000 and hints of spring in the 38-degree air, Punxsutawney Phil yesterday marked the 100th anniversary of his weather prognosticating with a bleak forecast: six more weeks of snow and ice. At exactly 7:29 a.m., after a warning tap on the bright orange doors of his burrow, the Punxsutawney groundhog was yanked from his electrically heated home by official Punxsutawney Phil handler Bud Dunkel....
NEWS
February 5, 1998 | by Scott Flander, Daily News Staff Writer
You might think that if there's any place in the world where groundhogs are sacred, it's Punxsutawney, Pa., proud home of Punxsutawney Phil. You'd be wrong. In fact, you might get punched out. That's what happened Monday to Denny Rebuck, the guy who wears the Punxsutawney Phil costume every year at the town's Groundhog Day celebration. As Rebuck was meandering through the crowd of 20,000 - who were all waiting for the real Punxsutawney Phil to appear - he was knocked to the ground and pummeled by six young men. "Boy, we got that damn groundhog," Rebuck said he heard one of his attackers boast.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years, we have asked people to explain why a groundhog named Punxsutawney Phil has meteorological authority. Some studies show that his prognostications are little better than random. Anyway, on Monday, Phil said we're going to have six more weeks of winter. Which is more or less right, because he said so on Feb. 2 and the last day of winter is March 19. Good one, Phil! Oh, but look: Staten Island Chuck , Phil's woodchucky rival up north, says we'll have a short winter!
NEWS
February 3, 2015
HEY, IT'S GROUNDHOG Day, a day that helps explain our politics. First, it's a Pennsylvania thing, you know, Punxsutawney Phil and all. Second, it's about rodents and shadowy behavior. Third, our politics play out like "Groundhog Day," the 1993 Bill Murray film in which the same stuff keeps happening over and over. I mean, come on, Rob McCord's just the latest in a long line. And, really, what's our expectation? We check to see if groundhog Phil sees his shadow, which means six more weeks of winter; or doesn't, which means an early spring.
SPORTS
February 3, 2015 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
It's a little-known fact that Punxsutawney Phil, the world's most famous groundhog, has a cousin who lives 283 miles to the east. Manayunk Manny roams just below Main Street on the banks of the Schuylkill. Once a year, the day before Phil becomes the world's most famous weather rodent, the two furry cousins meet in Harrisburg. Before they burrowed down Sunday and watched Super Bowl XLIX, Phil and Manny reminisced about the previous year and discussed the big day ahead. The Inquirer was invited along and asked to transcribe the reunion.
FOOD
March 21, 2014 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
Perhaps, instead of his shadow, Punxsutawney Phil should have gone in search of fava beans. That would be more useful after a relentless winter like this one, the longest stew season of recent memory. "Every time it seemed like it was going to end, it kept going. I could not wait to see the end of this winter," says Brian Ricci, chef of Kennett in Queen Village. "I'm definitely thinking about what's coming from the farms and what we'll do for our spring menu. " Though not all of your favorite spring vegetables may be available yet, there are ways to cook ourselves out of the spiritual haze in the meantime.
NEWS
February 3, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
On Groundhog Day, one is tempted to wonder how a supersized rodent came to be a symbol of hope. Perhaps those tourists flocking to an obscure patch of Pennsylvania called Gobbler's Knob only think they've come to see a seer named Punxsutawney Phil. They may instead be acting upon a universal human yearning for community, for a respite from the isolation imposed by, say, an Arctic vortex. These Punxsutawney pilgrims may simply be expressing our communal wish for better weather.
NEWS
March 29, 2013
We greet the start of winter with feasts and revelry. By February, we're cold, tired, and seizing on almost any sign that better days are ahead - even if it's furnished by a large rodent handled by a Western Pennsylvanian wearing a top hat. But after a resolutely frigid March proved that omen as dubious as it seemed, the people required vengeance on said rodent. If spring, with its high holy days and rising temperatures, embodies hope, prolonged winters are suffused with a special despair.
NEWS
March 27, 2013 | By Peter Mucha, Philly.com
It's no secret that Punxsutawney Phil is a shadowy underworld figure. And yet it now looks like the dirty rat-cousin could burrow his way out of a possible death sentence in Ohio. A supposed higher-up in the Gobbler's Knob mob has stepped forward to be the fall (or winter and still-not-spring) guy. Police in Maryland, however, have yet to withdraw their "Suspect Wanted for Fraud" proclamation. Being a famous groundhog in Pennsylvania isn't such a warm and fuzzy deal anymore.
NEWS
March 26, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Yes, it's technically spring. Yes, famed groundhog Punxsutawney Phil indicated spring would arrive early. Yes, Jersey Shore entertainment venues spent the weekend cranking up for the beach season, and there was a regatta on the Schuylkill. But - and you knew this was coming – it appears Old Man Winter has decided to snow on this parade. Philadelphia is expected to get one to three inches of mostly slushy stuff Monday. North and west of the city there could be two to four inches, and the Shore could get three to six, by some estimates.
NEWS
March 25, 2013 | By Amanda Lee Myers and Mark Scolforo, Associated Press
CINCINNATI - A shadow of a different kind is hanging over Punxsutawney Phil. Authorities in still-frigid Ohio have issued an "indictment" against the famed groundhog, who predicted an early spring when he didn't see his shadow after emerging from his lair in Western Pennsylvania on Feb. 2. Spring arrived Wednesday, and temperatures are still hovering in the 30s in the Buckeye state and much of the Northeast. While it's not the coldest spring on record, it's a good 5 degrees below normal, said Don Hughes, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Wilmington, Ohio.
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