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NEWS
November 26, 1992 | For The Inquirer / DAVID J. JACKSON
The pupils at Plymouth Elementary School in the Colonial School District have dedicated their new, $35,000 playground. Each grade gave a performance, from rap to poetry, during the event, held Friday. The school PTO helped pay for the playground, which includes slides and climbing bars on a safety surface.
NEWS
March 5, 1986 | By John McDonough, Special to The Inquirer
Henry Clay Loudenslager will not be forgotten, at least not in Paulsboro. Thanks to a group of diligent fifth-grade students, the township of Paulsboro has dedicated a day to the memory of the former U.S. congressman and Paulsboro resident who died in 1911. Seven fifth graders from the elementary school that bears Loudenslager's name made a presentation about the former congressman to the Paulsboro Township Council last night. Students from two classes had helped to prepare a neatly typed 16-page report about Loudenslager, who was a congressman from 1893 to 1911.
NEWS
September 7, 1988 | By Lillian Micko, Special to The Inquirer
Intense lobbying is paying off today, the first day of school, as 94 Holy Rosary Elementary School pupils who had requested bus transportation from the Cherry Hill School District are receiving it. As an added benefit of the lobbying by Holy Rosary parents, 36 pupils attending the nearby Horace Mann Elementary School also will receive bus transportation. Just a few weeks ago, Holy Rosary principal Sister James Kathleen said, it seemed that 42 pupils who had been bused in prior years would have to find another way to get to school.
NEWS
April 8, 1990 | By Monica L. Williams, Special to The Inquirer
The children screamed and squealed in excitement as the man in black entered the room. It didn't seem to matter much that many of the children had never heard of the entertainer who paid them a surprise visit Wednesday. The introduction was enough. "He has a brother named Michael, a sister named Janet who's younger and a brother named Jermaine," principal Joanne Weaver told the kids. "His name is Randy Jackson and he's a member of the Jackson 5. " Randy Jackson, 26, the youngest male member of the singing Jackson family, waved and smiled to the excited children as he walked into the gymnasium at Willow Hill Elementary School in Abington.
NEWS
June 27, 1989 | By Cynthia Burton, Daily News Staff Writer
Carrying cardboard signs, six James R. Lowell Elementary School pupils marched up and down the side of School District headquarters yesterday as two mothers pleaded with a poker-faced Board of Education to keep the school intact. Parents and children were protesting School District plans announced last week to ease overcrowing by sending seventh and eighth graders from Lowell, at 5th Street and Nedro Avenue, to the Samuel S. Fels Junior High School, two miles away at Devereaux and Langdon streets.
NEWS
May 6, 2015 | Regina Medina, Daily News Staff Writer
MAYORAL CANDIDATE Doug Oliver did it again with the young'uns, rocking the world of fourth- and fifth-graders in the Philadelphia School District yesterday during a youth mayoral forum. The students - from Julia de Burgos, Avery D. Harrington, John Wister, William Dick and Edwin M. Stanton elementary schools - swarmed Oliver just to chat and see him up close after the forum. It was held in the district headquarters auditorium and hosted by the Rendell Center for Civics and Civic Engagement.
NEWS
June 10, 1986 | By Constance Barry, Special to The Inquirer
The Lower Camden County Regional Board of Education last night bowed to pressure from parents and dropped plans to send 47 Winslow Township students to Edgewood Senior High School this fall. The board instead agreed to continue its policy of sending the Winslow pupils, who are now in the eighth grade at Winslow School No. 4, to the overcrowded Overbrook Senior High School in Lindenwold. The redistricting plan was tabled at a board meeting last month after a half-dozen parents contended that the Edgewood proposal would create problems for families who already had older children attending Overbrook.
NEWS
May 7, 1986 | By Charlie Frush, Inquirer Staff Writer
Perhaps, for the squeamish, there ought to be a warning sign on the door to the frog-dissecting classroom, but otherwise everything will be "PG" rated today when Edgewater Park Township's Jacques and Magowan schools conduct their third biennial Learning Fair. The two-hour program kicks off tonight at 7 p.m., according to superintendent Walter Dold, when "all the students demonstrate activities they do during the normal year. " Designed to foster parent-student communication by encouraging parents to ask students about their activities, the program will include a first-grade operetta, physical-education dancing, a gym show, a fashion show by home economics students, art displays and projects, science studies (beware the frogs)
NEWS
January 3, 1997 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Quilts designed by Coatesville Area School District children are on display at the Chester County Historical Society, 225 N. High St., West Chester, through Jan. 11. The society is open from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. With 87 silk-screened patterns designed and painted by students ages 6 through 12, the quilts contain scenes from the children's lives, translated into simple designs and brilliant colors. The quilts were produced under the guidance of professional artists.
NEWS
December 3, 1987 | By Dale Mezzacappa, Inquirer Staff Writer
Protesting parents at McMichael Elementary School said yesterday that they planned to send their children back to school today but that they still intended to meet with School Superintendent Constance E. Clayton to press their request that a popular acting principal be assigned there permanently as principal. Many parents have kept their children out of the West Philadelphia school since Monday, when Russell Sgro was appointed principal to replace Nilsa Gonzalez, who had run the school since January during the illness of principal Ella Evans, who died in September.
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NEWS
September 7, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Poised to enter his fourth year as superintendent Tuesday, William R. Hite Jr. said this back-to-school cycle feels different. "This is the first year since I've been in Philadelphia that I'm excited about more things than I'm nervous about," said Hite. Even with potentially bruising fights for funding in Harrisburg and City Hall still ahead, a newly decided court ruling that could allow for explosive, unplanned charter growth, and a tough two-plus years without a teachers' contract, the Philadelphia School District chief believes he can finally spend much of his time focusing, he said, "on the stuff that matters.
NEWS
September 4, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
STRUCTURAL problems at a large Northeast Philadelphia elementary school will delay the start of class for some pupils and force others to relocate to a nearby school for the entire year, officials said yesterday. The problems were found at the Solis-Cohen School, on Horrocks Street near Tyson Avenue, one of the district's largest K-6 schools, with about 1,370 students. As a result, pupils in kindergarten and first grade will be located in the school's annex, a stand-alone building.
NEWS
May 29, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
PHILADELPHIA'S public schools are spending less per child than in 2007, partially due to rising costs for pensions and health care, according to an independent report released yesterday by the school district. The analysis, conducted by Education Research Strategies Inc., a Massachusetts-based nonprofit research organization, shows the district spent $12,724 per-pupil in 2013-14, down from $13,384 in 2007-08, a 5 percent decline. District officials said the report bears out what they have been saying for a while - mandated costs are rising faster than revenue, taking precious dollars away from the classroom.
NEWS
May 22, 2015 | By Cat Coyle, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frith deKerillis said she was changed this year by the philosophies of her second graders. The Erdenheim Elementary School teacher spent all year incorporating ideas of mindfulness and thoughtfulness into her classroom as part of a leadership project - Habits of the Mind - the Flourtown elementary school recently expanded. "My outlook now captures more patience, understanding, and endless positive energy," deKerillis said. To mark the end of this year's project, more than 750 pupils sent "well wishes" into the universe Wednesday when they gathered on the school playground and blew bubbles into the sky. The Springfield (Montco)
NEWS
May 20, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
PATRICIA LAFFERTY has some rules for pupils learning cursive writing in her class. "Proper posture for proper penmanship," Lafferty told her third-graders yesterday at St. Anthony of Padua Regional Catholic School in South Philadelphia. "Put your feet under your desk, not under your chairs. " They were learning to write a proper cursive "n" in their handbooks. Each page had a sample cursive letter and an area to practice it, with three lines to help guide their writing. The boys and girls watched Lafferty write a lowercase "n" on the chalkboard, which also had the three lines.
NEWS
May 6, 2015 | Regina Medina, Daily News Staff Writer
MAYORAL CANDIDATE Doug Oliver did it again with the young'uns, rocking the world of fourth- and fifth-graders in the Philadelphia School District yesterday during a youth mayoral forum. The students - from Julia de Burgos, Avery D. Harrington, John Wister, William Dick and Edwin M. Stanton elementary schools - swarmed Oliver just to chat and see him up close after the forum. It was held in the district headquarters auditorium and hosted by the Rendell Center for Civics and Civic Engagement.
NEWS
April 10, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
SCIENCE AND MATH teacher Jason Bui knew a few years back that he wanted to start an after-school chess club at S. Weir Mitchell Elementary, at 55th Street and Kingsessing Avenue, in Kingsessing. The pupils who joined the club - which he named the Minor Threats after the early-'80s hard-core punk band Minor Threat - had no idea that chess would have an impact on their minds, their attitudes and their families. "By the time we were the Minor Threats, I was already seeing an impact," said Bui, 33, who this year moved to Andrew Hamilton Elementary, on Spruce Street near 56th, West Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 17, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Compared with big-city peers, the Philadelphia School District spends less per pupil than almost any other education system in the country - even Detroit's. Philadelphia's per-pupil price tag last school year was $12,570 - the lowest of any comparable district except Memphis, Tenn.; Tampa, Fla.; and Dallas, the Pew Charitable Trusts concluded in a report released Thursday. Detroit spent $13,419 per student, and Boston, at the top of the peer-district list, spent $18,626. Pennsylvania is one of just three states that lack an education funding formula, and city schools have paid the price in recent years, with many unable to fund full-time guidance counselors or after-school activities.
NEWS
January 16, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
A NEW REPORT on K-12 education funding finds that Philadelphia lags behind many big-city school districts in per-pupil funding. The report, commissioned by Pew Charitable Trusts, analyzes funding of 10 large school districts across the country in states with a comprehensive funding formula that takes into account need, demographics and poverty. (Pennsylvania is one of three states that does not have such a formula.) It concludes that in 2012-13, the Philadelphia School District spent roughly $12,570 per pupil - less than the average of Boston, Milwaukee, Cleveland, New York, Baltimore, Chicago and Detroit.
NEWS
October 16, 2014
PHILADELPHIA finally has a cigarette tax. The Legislature's approval was the result of advocacy by many stakeholders: parents and teachers, the mayor and business leaders, and a coalition of legislators from in and outside of Philadelphia. We applaud the governor and the Pennsylvania General Assembly for passage of this much-needed, short-term funding solution. Yet, there is much more work to do. Now is the time to refocus our work on the strategic short-, medium- and long-term efforts of reform that will ensure a safe, fiscally sound and quality outcome for our schools.
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