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Puppy Mills

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NEWS
March 21, 2005 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The billboard welcomes visitors to Lancaster County, but it isn't meant to increase tourism. Main Line Rescue, which paid for the folksy sign, wants to warn visitors about an activity that doesn't get the same attention as shopping outlets and Amish farms. "Welcome to scenic Lancaster County, home to hundreds of puppy mills," reads the sign on the eastbound Pennsylvania Turnpike between the Lebanon/Lancaster and Reading/Ephrata exits. The animal welfare group hopes the sign raises awareness of a persistent problem in rural Lancaster County: the mass production of puppies in inhumane and sometimes illegal kennels.
NEWS
July 22, 1991 | By Michele M. Fizzano, Special to The Inquirer
Mary Panebianco cradled her new puppy, Dixie, as it coughed up blood onto the kitchen floor. The Panebiancos, of West Chester, had bought the chow/shepherd mix three days before at a Chester County kennel. That April night, Dixie died. "I thought I was strong, but that really broke me," said Panebianco, who has a 2-year-old daughter. "I hope I never have to see or hear anything like that again. " The family veterinarian said Dixie died of parvo, a viral disease often caused by poor nutrition and parasites.
NEWS
May 2, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
What's Gov. Corbett got against puppies? After years of complaints from dog lovers and people who unknowingly purchased sick and dying pets that had been raised inside puppy-mill cages no bigger than a rabbit hutch, Pennsylvania passed a 2008 law ensuring humane treatment for tens of thousands of kennel dwellers. That law, aimed at ridding Pennsylvania of its reputation as the worst puppy-mill state in the East, has served as a model for 20 other states. But Corbett isn't interested in its enforcement.
NEWS
July 31, 1990 | By Andrew Cassel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Terra was a disaster. Her front legs were crooked, her teeth didn't bite right, and her white Maltese face was stained around the eyes from a condition that made her tear ducts work overtime. Worse, a congenital skin disorder had caused her to chew off most of the curly white hair on her rump, and she chased herself frantically in a tight, painful circle when Marlene Harris put her into her cage. "She'll be put to sleep," Harris sighed. "It's heartbreaking, because we've gotten real attached to her. " A dozen other dogs yelped and bounced against their cage doors in the small Parsons Humane Society shelter.
NEWS
July 5, 2007 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the end of country lanes, behind tall fences, and inside picturesque barns lies Lancaster County's dirty little secret: thousands of purebred dogs - whose offspring sell for hundreds of dollars at pet stores in Philadelphia and elsewhere - living in Dickensian conditions: undersized wire cages; no exercise; minimal, if any, medical care. Those images - well documented by undercover video and humane officers over the last 25 years - prompted animal lover and Old City gallery director Jennifer Yaron to stage what may be the first-ever exhibition dedicated to drawing attention to the plight of dogs in commercial kennels, known across the animal-welfare community as "puppy mills.
NEWS
March 29, 2006
GOV. RENDELL has taken on possibly one of the most volatile and emotional issues of his tenure: puppy mills. These despicable places, where dogs are bred and raised in unsanitary, crowded and disease-prone conditions, flourish in Pennsylvania, specifically in Lancaster County. Known for lush farms and its Amish population, the county and its more than 240 puppy mills have helped make Pennsylvania "The Puppy Mill Capitol of The East. " It's a shameful reputation. Rendell, a dog-lover himself, wants to change that.
NEWS
September 12, 2015 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Camden County Freeholders announced Thursday that they intend to introduce and vote on a resolution that would prohibit pet stores from selling animals obtained from so-called puppy and kitten mills. Instead, the shops would have to get their dogs and cats from animal shelters or rescues. Freeholder Jeff Nash, sponsor of the resolution, said he is confident it will pass when voted on next Thursday. The resolution is named Norman's Law after Nash's Labrador retriever mix, which he adopted from a shelter.
NEWS
September 20, 2015 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Camden County freeholders voted unanimously Thursday to prohibit pet stores from selling animals from puppy mills. Called Norman's Law after the Labrador retriever mix Freeholder Jeffrey L. Nash adopted from a shelter, the measure calls for shops to sell dogs and cats obtained from animal shelters and rescues. "As we said last week, we are going to stand up for animals of this county and ensure no one is profiting off of the inhumane treatment of puppy mills," said Nash, sponsor of the resolution.
NEWS
December 17, 1995
How sick is that doggie in the window? That - rather than the melodically famous "how much?" - should probably be the first question asked by local dog buyers. As vividly documented by Inquirer staff writer Karl Stark last Sunday, chances are all too good that a puppy bought from a pet store or large-scale breeder in Pennsylvania will have health or temperament problems. Pennsylvania breeds the most dogs of any state on the East Coast, and too many of them come from "puppy mills," mass operations where dogs are carelessly bred - leading to defects or nasty dispositions - or raised in crowded, dirty conditions that promote viruses.
NEWS
April 29, 2008 | By Bryan R. Lentz
Recently, viewers of the Oprah Winfrey Show tuned into a widely publicized television show devoted to exposing horrific living conditions and abuses in puppy mills. Unfortunately, puppy mills in Pennsylvania played a major role in this broadcast. Several Pennsylvania puppy mills, where there was widespread neglect and deplorable conditions, were toured. Small dogs were stuffed into rabbit hutches. Kennel operators dragged dogs by their front legs. Of the 20 dogs that were rescued, nearly all were suffering from dental disease.
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NEWS
April 6, 2016 | By Stu Bykofsky
A CITY COUNCIL committee slammed shut a door that had been closed five years earlier. At first glance, a bill to ban the sale of dogs raised in puppy mills seems to duplicate a law enacted in 2011, but bill sponsor Councilman Kenyatta Johnson, a self-described "animal lover," said it was designed to "close a loophole. " Vincent Medley, executive director of the Animal Care and Control Team, the city's animal shelter, told Council's Committee on Licenses and Inspections that as far as he knew, no Philadelphia pet stores were selling puppy-mill dogs.
NEWS
February 13, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia could soon become the next city to ban pet stores from selling commercially bred dogs and cats, a move that prioritizes adoption of rescue animals and is aimed at stopping the growth of so-called animal mills. Advocates acknowledge that the legislation is preventative; they know of no pet stores in Philadelphia selling animals from breeders. But they say it is needed nonetheless, in part because breeders searching for spots to sell their animals will have to avoid cities with these laws on the books.
NEWS
September 20, 2015 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Camden County freeholders voted unanimously Thursday to prohibit pet stores from selling animals from puppy mills. Called Norman's Law after the Labrador retriever mix Freeholder Jeffrey L. Nash adopted from a shelter, the measure calls for shops to sell dogs and cats obtained from animal shelters and rescues. "As we said last week, we are going to stand up for animals of this county and ensure no one is profiting off of the inhumane treatment of puppy mills," said Nash, sponsor of the resolution.
NEWS
September 12, 2015 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Camden County Freeholders announced Thursday that they intend to introduce and vote on a resolution that would prohibit pet stores from selling animals obtained from so-called puppy and kitten mills. Instead, the shops would have to get their dogs and cats from animal shelters or rescues. Freeholder Jeff Nash, sponsor of the resolution, said he is confident it will pass when voted on next Thursday. The resolution is named Norman's Law after Nash's Labrador retriever mix, which he adopted from a shelter.
NEWS
October 14, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
After 20 years and three cats, William Young of Bridgeport finally discovered the source of his allergies - the felines in the family. The "a-ha!" moment for the stay-at-home dad turned into a "hurrah!" moment for his kids. They had wanted a dog for years, and now the way was clear, even though the current cat had to move to Grandma's. So the Youngs walked through the fifth annual Sproutfest community pet adoption event in King of Prussia on Sunday looking to find a new member of the family.
NEWS
August 27, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Christmas, while his 3-year-old daughter opened her presents, pet-shop owner Michael Gill was in his bathroom cradling an English bulldog mix puppy suffering from a lethal canine virus. The dog had contracted parvo, a deadly and highly contagious intestinal disease. Six puppies in his store that died, along with seven that became sick, were delivered by a Missouri-based dog distributor, he said. "It was the single worst experience I've had with animals in 20 years," said Gill, owner of We Love Pets in Media.
NEWS
July 11, 2014
ANN COULTER knows how to get our attention, which is not always a good thing. Nikita Khrushchev got our attention, as did Miley Cyrus, Sandra Fluke and George Zimmerman. The mere fact that we're listening is not a propitious sign. However, it does mean that whatever falls from Ann's mouth will generally be talked about by the sort of people who either think she is a goddess of common sense or who think she peddles horse manure. I don't fall into either category. To me, the objectively brilliant pundit with an Ivy pedigree and Little Mermaid hair is neither a paragon nor a virago.
NEWS
January 23, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - The embattled office charged with enforcing laws governing Pennsylvania's more than 2,100 dog kennels has its first permanent director since 2012. Agriculture Secretary George Greig on Tuesday named Kristen Donmoyer, a veteran state dog warden and supervisor, as the new director of the dog law enforcement office. "Kristen brings the law enforcement experience and knowledge of the state's dog laws necessary to protect dogs across the state," Greig said. Donmoyer's appointment comes nearly 18 months after Lynn Diehl was forced out for failing to conduct inspections of the state's largest commercial breeding kennels.
NEWS
August 26, 2012
Jesse Smith did her job when she was Pennsylvania's special deputy secretary for dog-law enforcement. In return, she was relentlessly criticized in anonymous blogs whose writers went so far as to accuse her of marital infidelity as they questioned her ethics. How Smith was treated reflects the lack of civility too often found in today's public discourse, and it's even worse in cyberspace. It's not that the behavior of officials who implement public policy should be excluded from a robust discussion, but the personal attacks Smith endured step over the line.
NEWS
May 2, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
What's Gov. Corbett got against puppies? After years of complaints from dog lovers and people who unknowingly purchased sick and dying pets that had been raised inside puppy-mill cages no bigger than a rabbit hutch, Pennsylvania passed a 2008 law ensuring humane treatment for tens of thousands of kennel dwellers. That law, aimed at ridding Pennsylvania of its reputation as the worst puppy-mill state in the East, has served as a model for 20 other states. But Corbett isn't interested in its enforcement.
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