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Purdue Pharma

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NEWS
August 22, 2001 | By Alicia A. Caldwell INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Pennsylvania Attorney General Mike Fisher criticized the maker of OxyContin yesterday, saying Purdue Pharma continues to aggressively market its powerful and profitable painkiller even as deaths rise among abusers. "I have to think their main concern is going all the way to the bank," Fisher said in an interview at a conference he called to update the region's police and pharmacists on how OxyContin gets into abusers' hands and ways to stop it. Since OxyContin was introduced in 1996, formulated in a 12-hour time release for patients suffering moderate to severe pain, Purdue Pharma's total sales of the drug have exceeded $1 billion.
NEWS
August 29, 2001 | By Alicia A. Caldwell INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Citing overwhelming reports of OxyContin abuse, U.S. Rep. Jim Greenwood (R., Pa.) said yesterday that drug manufacturer Purdue Pharma had a responsibility to report doctors who overprescribe the potentially deadly painkiller. Greenwood, whose district includes Bensalem, where Richard G. Paolino allegedly wrote more than 1,200 prescriptions in a four-month period, also questioned why Purdue Pharma did not blow the whistle on the physician, because the Stamford, Conn., company had sales details on physicians and how much of the drug they prescribe.
NEWS
November 9, 2001 | By Marc Schogol INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The manufacturer of OxyContin, the increasingly abused and potentially deadly painkiller, is launching a radio-advertising campaign in Philadelphia and three other localities to discourage teenagers from illegally using prescription drugs. Without citing specific figures, Purdue Pharma, based in Stamford, Conn., said it targeted Philadelphia; Cincinnati, Ohio; Charleston, W.Va.; and Palm Beach County, Fla.; because of their high rate of prescription-drug abuse. The new radio ads, part of a $1 million drug-education campaign called "Painfully Obvious," do not mention OxyContin or any other drug by name.
NEWS
August 31, 2001
In just a few years, the heavy-duty painkiller OxyContin has achieved whopping success. Introduced in 1996, the Purdue Pharma product ranks as the nation's 18th most-prescribed drug, with $1.2 billion in sales from May 2000 to last May. Most of those sales were to people in legitimate need of strong pain relief. But you have to wonder: What percentage of OxyContin's success is due to the drug's popularity as an illegal high? Yes, "oxy," as it's known, can get you high - or dead.
NEWS
June 6, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
The City of Chicago is suing two Chester County drug companies that it claims orchestrated a deceptive marketing campaign to hide the dangers of painkillers, contributing to a national opioid-addiction crisis. The marketing tactics used by Malvern-based Endo Health Solutions and Frazer-based Cephalon were so successful that over two decades, opioids went from being rarely used to the most prescribed type of drug, the suit alleges. "Their deceptive messages tainted virtually every source doctors could rely on for information and prevented them from making informed treatment decisions," says the suit, filed Monday in an Illinois state court.
NEWS
July 10, 2001 | By Elisa Ung and Mary Anne Janco INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
A spike in Delaware County deaths linked to abuse of the oxycodone family of prescription painkillers - including the powerful drug OxyContin - indicates that the number of such deaths in the Philadelphia region may be increasing, authorities said yesterday. The number of oxycodone-related deaths reported by medical examiners throughout the eight-county region in 1999 already led the nation, a federal drug-abuse survey showed. Delaware County District Attorney Patrick Meehan, who is expected to be nominated as U.S. attorney in Philadelphia, said most of the county's 22 oxycodone-related deaths in the last 18 months - many involving other drugs as well - were among middle-aged white males.
NEWS
July 31, 2001
If a dangerous new drug showed up in your neighborhood, how far would you go to protect your neighbors and their children from it? Say you co-owned a pharmacy and realized that phony prescriptions were being used to dispense the drug. Would you keep careful copies of the fake prescriptions and also warn other pharmacies? Would you alert the federal Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and keep bugging people there when it seemed no one was following up? Would you persist even in the face of firebombings and death threats?
BUSINESS
June 13, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
College is supposed to be a place to open one's mind to new ideas, but too often it has become a place to begin abusing prescription drugs - assuming that wasn't first tried in high school. "Colleges get a new crop of eager high school graduates each year," U.S. Attorney Zane David Memeger said in his opening remarks to a gathering Wednesday at Temple University. "Unfortunately, one of the lessons these students failed to learn in high school is the risks with prescription drugs, and that can play itself out on campuses throughout the country.
NEWS
July 3, 2013 | By David Sell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Middle-aged women are dying from overdoses of prescription opioid painkillers at "skyrocketing" rates, more than five times as often in 2010 as they were in 1999, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday. "Mothers, sisters and daughters are dying from prescription drug overdoses more than we've ever seen," CDC Director Tom Frieden said in a conference call with reporters. The CDC previously reported that deaths from overdoses of prescription opioid painkillers had exceeded those of cocaine and heroin combined.
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BUSINESS
June 13, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
College is supposed to be a place to open one's mind to new ideas, but too often it has become a place to begin abusing prescription drugs - assuming that wasn't first tried in high school. "Colleges get a new crop of eager high school graduates each year," U.S. Attorney Zane David Memeger said in his opening remarks to a gathering Wednesday at Temple University. "Unfortunately, one of the lessons these students failed to learn in high school is the risks with prescription drugs, and that can play itself out on campuses throughout the country.
NEWS
June 6, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
The City of Chicago is suing two Chester County drug companies that it claims orchestrated a deceptive marketing campaign to hide the dangers of painkillers, contributing to a national opioid-addiction crisis. The marketing tactics used by Malvern-based Endo Health Solutions and Frazer-based Cephalon were so successful that over two decades, opioids went from being rarely used to the most prescribed type of drug, the suit alleges. "Their deceptive messages tainted virtually every source doctors could rely on for information and prevented them from making informed treatment decisions," says the suit, filed Monday in an Illinois state court.
BUSINESS
July 4, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Middle-aged women are dying from overdoses of prescription opioid painkillers at "skyrocketing" rates, more than five times as often in 2010 as in 1999, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday. "Mothers, sisters, and daughters are dying from prescription drug overdoses more than we've ever seen," CDC director Tom Frieden said in a conference call with reporters. The CDC previously reported that deaths from overdoses of prescription opioid painkillers had exceeded those of cocaine and heroin combined.
NEWS
April 3, 2002 | By Peter Sigal INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dr. Richard Paolino prescribed OxyContin - an addictive painkiller intended for gravely ill cancer patients - to people who had no need for such a powerful drug, a prosecutor told a jury yesterday in Bucks County Court. "People with backaches were getting OxyContin from Richard Paolino over and over again," prosecutor Gary Gambardella said in his opening statement. Paolino, 59, is charged with practicing medicine without a license, delivery of a controlled substance, conspiracy, and nearly 1,400 counts of insurance fraud.
NEWS
November 9, 2001 | By Marc Schogol INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The manufacturer of OxyContin, the increasingly abused and potentially deadly painkiller, is launching a radio-advertising campaign in Philadelphia and three other localities to discourage teenagers from illegally using prescription drugs. Without citing specific figures, Purdue Pharma, based in Stamford, Conn., said it targeted Philadelphia; Cincinnati, Ohio; Charleston, W.Va.; and Palm Beach County, Fla.; because of their high rate of prescription-drug abuse. The new radio ads, part of a $1 million drug-education campaign called "Painfully Obvious," do not mention OxyContin or any other drug by name.
NEWS
September 6, 2001 | By Elisa Ung INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
State representatives said yesterday they will propose legislation that would tack an additional five years onto the potential sentence of anyone convicted of dealing or trafficking in OxyContin, the prescription painkiller that has become a lethal street drug throughout the nation. Pointing to dozens of OxyContin-related deaths in the city and suburbs, House Majority Leader John Perzel (R., Phila.) said the drug is so dangerous that those who illegally sell it deserve additional punishment.
NEWS
September 4, 2001 | By Elisa Ung INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kim Bondarenko says her insurance company is making it harder for her to get OxyContin, the drug that annihilated her severe neurological pain and let her go back to work. Orthopedic surgeon Norman A. Johanson has shied away from prescribing it after hearing about the region's recent spike in deaths linked to abuse of the drug. And pain specialists across the country are concerned that increased vigilance in administering OxyContin may be causing people to suffer needlessly.
NEWS
August 31, 2001
In just a few years, the heavy-duty painkiller OxyContin has achieved whopping success. Introduced in 1996, the Purdue Pharma product ranks as the nation's 18th most-prescribed drug, with $1.2 billion in sales from May 2000 to last May. Most of those sales were to people in legitimate need of strong pain relief. But you have to wonder: What percentage of OxyContin's success is due to the drug's popularity as an illegal high? Yes, "oxy," as it's known, can get you high - or dead.
NEWS
August 29, 2001 | By Alicia A. Caldwell INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Citing overwhelming reports of OxyContin abuse, U.S. Rep. Jim Greenwood (R., Pa.) said yesterday that drug manufacturer Purdue Pharma had a responsibility to report doctors who overprescribe the potentially deadly painkiller. Greenwood, whose district includes Bensalem, where Richard G. Paolino allegedly wrote more than 1,200 prescriptions in a four-month period, also questioned why Purdue Pharma did not blow the whistle on the physician, because the Stamford, Conn., company had sales details on physicians and how much of the drug they prescribe.
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