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Pure Love

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NEWS
January 18, 1993 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rabbi Alexander E. Levin, 79, a man who kept his congregation together for more than 20 years after his temple closed and he retired, died Friday at Albert Einstein Medical Center. He lived in Wyncote. Rabbi Levin was the spiritual leader of the East Lane Temple, located at 11th Street and Oak Lane in Philadelphia, from the early 1950s until the early 1970s. Afterward, he continued to serve his congregation, presiding over various family events and services for High Holy Days every year at the Cedarbrook Country Club.
NEWS
October 15, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Darryl L. Coates, 55, an executive who worked to stem the tide of drug abuse and violence among Philadelphia's young people, died Thursday, Oct. 2, of complications from a stroke at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. From 2005 until he became ill in 2012, Mr. Coates was executive director of the Philadelphia Anti-Drug/Anti-Violence Network (PAAN), where he collaborated with city, state, and national officials on intervention strategies. "Darryl led with authority and strength, and served with humility," PAAN said in a statement on its website.
NEWS
April 9, 2008 | By Sam Adams FOR THE INQUIRER
Mick Jones and Tony James named their band Carbon/Silicon for the meeting of flesh-and-blood passion and technology. But their furious performance at World Cafe Live on Monday night showed that this machine runs best on fossil fuels. Stripped down to a four-piece format with no supplemental electronics, they blazed through an hour-long set like a coal-burning engine: hot, powerful and dirty. With royalties from his days with the Clash paying his bills, Jones' periodic returns to making music have no apparent motive beyond the pure love of the game.
NEWS
August 3, 2004
It was all about Alex. It was never about Alex. Maybe that's why the first page of the Web site, www.alexslemonade.com, made no mention yesterday of 8-year-old Alexandra Scott's death from neuroblastoma, an often fatal form of pediatric cancer. Instead, a click away in a journal called "Alex's Page," was a two-sentence entry from her parents and other family members dated Aug. 1: "At about 4 p.m. today Alex passed away peacefully with us holding her hands. We thank you for your support.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1991 | By Robert G. Seidenstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Time to warm those little hearts - and the larger ones as well. The holidays, of course, are coming. So, too, are stories of the season. Several audio offerings highlight the holidays, starting with Leo Buscaglia's Seven Stories of Christmas Love (Nightingale-Conant Audio, two hours, $14.95). Buscaglia, justly famous for his lectures on human relations, has an approach tailor-made for Christmas. "The spirit of Christmas is love, and love is universal," he says in introducing stories "for those who have no trouble accepting miracles.
NEWS
August 31, 2014 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
SUMMER is coughing out its last humid gasp and we'll soon be embroiled in dumb debates over how badly the Eagles will disappoint us this year. But first, let us ponder lessons from the Philly summer of 2014. What did we learn, people? 1. Amateur athletes can be more satisfying to watch than professional ones. In their thrilling August quest for a Little League World Series championship, the Taney Dragons showed more zeal, compassion and grace than the millionaire-clogged teams who annually break our hearts for a living.
NEWS
March 4, 1994 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Sarilynn Epps, who worked to ease the pain of fellow sufferers of breast cancer right up to the end of her own young life, died Wednesday of the disease. She was 36 and lived in the Logan section. Epps, who had been employed as a paralegal by the Philadelphia law firm of Shrager, McDaid, Loftus, Flum and Spivey, was diagnosed in 1989. About two years ago her health had deteriorated to the point where she had to give up her paralegal job. Thereafter she worked sporadically as her health and treatments permitted at a variety of temporary secretarial jobs.
NEWS
March 15, 1997 | By B. G. Kelley
Talk about compelling grit, compelling courage. A few weeks ago, the Carousel House in Fairmount Park held its 16th annual wheelchair basketball tournament. There were no swoops to the hoop, no tomahawk dunks, no leaping leaners, as at the NCAA tournament that has just begun. But, among the 120 wheelchair players, there was the kind of indomitable spirit on display that often defines sport. With freewheeling vigor, these physically challenged athletes rolled up and down the court, dishing out give-and-go passes with slide-rule accuracy, nailing three-point shots with only a strong flick of the wrist, filling the lane on a fast break.
SPORTS
September 3, 1995 | By Nita Lelyveld, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For George "Buddy" Marucci of Berwyn, who has golfed for nearly four decades, last week was the best. The 43-year-old amateur didn't win a big tournament, but he battled to the end at the U.S. Amateur in Newport, R.I., losing to 19-year-old wonder Tiger Woods on the 36th hole. When he lost, he did so beautifully, praising Woods warmly just moments after defeat. Of Woods, he said, "It's not just that's he's a great athlete. He's very, very dedicated and works very hard. But I was really impressed with his demeanor.
NEWS
April 2, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
ERLENE BASS NELSON taught kindergarten in the Philadelphia School District for 51 years, and there was no doubt that she enjoyed every minute of it for one, simple reason: She loved the children. Children, she once said, "are spontaneous, they're loving, they're forgiving - and every day I had an injection of pure love into my soul and into my heart. " Spending all that time in a school district that was often short of money and afflicted with labor problems, violence and other woes.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 15, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Darryl L. Coates, 55, an executive who worked to stem the tide of drug abuse and violence among Philadelphia's young people, died Thursday, Oct. 2, of complications from a stroke at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. From 2005 until he became ill in 2012, Mr. Coates was executive director of the Philadelphia Anti-Drug/Anti-Violence Network (PAAN), where he collaborated with city, state, and national officials on intervention strategies. "Darryl led with authority and strength, and served with humility," PAAN said in a statement on its website.
NEWS
August 31, 2014 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
SUMMER is coughing out its last humid gasp and we'll soon be embroiled in dumb debates over how badly the Eagles will disappoint us this year. But first, let us ponder lessons from the Philly summer of 2014. What did we learn, people? 1. Amateur athletes can be more satisfying to watch than professional ones. In their thrilling August quest for a Little League World Series championship, the Taney Dragons showed more zeal, compassion and grace than the millionaire-clogged teams who annually break our hearts for a living.
NEWS
April 2, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
ERLENE BASS NELSON taught kindergarten in the Philadelphia School District for 51 years, and there was no doubt that she enjoyed every minute of it for one, simple reason: She loved the children. Children, she once said, "are spontaneous, they're loving, they're forgiving - and every day I had an injection of pure love into my soul and into my heart. " Spending all that time in a school district that was often short of money and afflicted with labor problems, violence and other woes.
SPORTS
August 10, 2009 | By Bob Kelley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Earlier this season, when the Phillies were struggling, I was startled to see manager Charlie Manuel sharing a somber and amazingly candid view of the big picture. He said it was possible the team was just lucky enough to end last season on an upswing and never was playing consistently at the level of a World Series champion for any length of time. That kind of clear-eyed realism (or was he just cleverly goading his players into proving him wrong?) came as a welcome jolt in a game that veers so easily off its base paths thanks to dunderheadedness on the part of the players - see A-Rod cavorting with Kate Hudson in Miami Beach nightclubs until 2:30 a.m. the night after the Yankees benched him for fatigue - and especially the fans.
NEWS
April 9, 2008 | By Sam Adams FOR THE INQUIRER
Mick Jones and Tony James named their band Carbon/Silicon for the meeting of flesh-and-blood passion and technology. But their furious performance at World Cafe Live on Monday night showed that this machine runs best on fossil fuels. Stripped down to a four-piece format with no supplemental electronics, they blazed through an hour-long set like a coal-burning engine: hot, powerful and dirty. With royalties from his days with the Clash paying his bills, Jones' periodic returns to making music have no apparent motive beyond the pure love of the game.
NEWS
August 3, 2004
It was all about Alex. It was never about Alex. Maybe that's why the first page of the Web site, www.alexslemonade.com, made no mention yesterday of 8-year-old Alexandra Scott's death from neuroblastoma, an often fatal form of pediatric cancer. Instead, a click away in a journal called "Alex's Page," was a two-sentence entry from her parents and other family members dated Aug. 1: "At about 4 p.m. today Alex passed away peacefully with us holding her hands. We thank you for your support.
NEWS
March 21, 2002 | By Annette John-Hall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gospel-music titans Bill and Gloria Gaither are the modern-day equivalents of Jabez, the unassuming farmer of the Old Testament whose simple prayer, "Oh, that You would bless me indeed, and enlarge my territory . . . ," brought forth unimaginable blessings from God. Consider the "territory" that has expanded under the gregarious former schoolteachers' occupation: The Gaither Music Co., involved in Christian-music record and TV production, concert...
LIVING
November 28, 1999 | By William R. Macklin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sir John Templeton cares so much about agape love that he's even written a book about it. But when he's asked to define it, he pauses, lets a few reflective moments waft by, then, almost cryptically, says, "It's easier to tell you what it is not. " "It is not eros love. It is not filial love. It is not tribal love," says Templeton. Then, the one-time financier reaches into the recesses of the complex mind that helped conceive the rudiments of global investment and finds a definition that seems to belie all the hard-nosed tactics associated with the business world in which Templeton made millions.
NEWS
March 15, 1997 | By B. G. Kelley
Talk about compelling grit, compelling courage. A few weeks ago, the Carousel House in Fairmount Park held its 16th annual wheelchair basketball tournament. There were no swoops to the hoop, no tomahawk dunks, no leaping leaners, as at the NCAA tournament that has just begun. But, among the 120 wheelchair players, there was the kind of indomitable spirit on display that often defines sport. With freewheeling vigor, these physically challenged athletes rolled up and down the court, dishing out give-and-go passes with slide-rule accuracy, nailing three-point shots with only a strong flick of the wrist, filling the lane on a fast break.
NEWS
July 16, 1996 | Ellen Gray and Daily News wire services contributed to this report
Some guys never learn how to make a girl happy. Meg Ryan, star of the new Gulf War movie "Courage Under Fire," is baffled by a gift she received at a Pennsylvania dinner for military heroes. Ryan and "Courage" co-star Denzel Washington attended the Congressional Medal of Honor Society dinner in Hershey on June 15, and Washington received the group's Bob Hope National Artist Award for his heroic portrayal of military figures in several films. Ryan received a board game. Ryan talked about the gift on "The Rosie O'Donnell Show" last week: "They gave Denzel an award, and they gave me a Monopoly game, and I can't figure out why. " "I think they dissed you, Meg," O'Donnell responded.
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