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Purpose

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NEWS
September 17, 1992 | For The Inquirer / BOB WILLIAMS
Delaware County Community College held a flea market Sunday to raise money for the Hero Scholarship Fund of Marple Township. About 5,000 shoppers showed up for the event, searching for bargains offered by about 200 sellers.
NEWS
January 29, 1987
Your Jan. 23 front page photo of R. Budd Dwyer pointing a gun in his mouth was in extremely poor taste. My young school-age children who were playing in the snow brought the paper into the house. They had numerous questions about why a man would put a gun in his mouth and what happened to him. I was forced to try to explain suicide to children who are just barely coming to terms with natural death. Will my children or some other children remember this solution to a problem in later years when they are coping with problems of their own?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2004 | By Lloylita Prout FOR THE INQUIRER
Along with the beats, "Dancin' in the Streets 2" brings a meaningful message, and a service. With a party as a backdrop, Bebashi and Squarebiz will commemorate National HIV Testing Day by offering free confidential testing tonight on the steps of the Art Museum. From 7 to midnight, Illvibe Collective DJs Statik and Lil' Dave will shuffle wax under the needle as vendors offer T-shirts, libations and wares. Last year more than 350 people attended; 70 were tested. Tonight's "party with a purpose" is nonalcoholic and open to all ages.
NEWS
July 25, 2008 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
When it comes to handsaws, one usually isn't enough; there are saws for virtually every purpose. So, with help from Irwin, Shark and Woodcraft, among other makers and sellers, here are some things to think about before buying. Say you were building a cabin, and you wanted to produce rough boards for a door. You would use a crosscut saw to cut down a tree, and a rip saw to cut the tree lengthwise for the boards. With a bow saw, you would cut the larger leftover pieces of the tree into short ones that could be split quickly with an ax for fuel for a stove or fireplace.
NEWS
July 4, 1996 | By David Walsh
The Fourth of July seems like the simplest holiday of all. It celebrates American independence. It is the day when America became a nation by throwing off the constraints of British rule. What could be more self-evident than the Declaration of Independence? Nothing, except that the purpose of independence was nowhere clearly defined. It is merely assumed as an unlimited good without further explanation as to why it is so. Above all it is the brevity of the Declaration's articulation of purpose as "life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness" that causes our problems.
NEWS
May 28, 2008 | By Elizabeth Eisenstadt Evans
Recently, my daughter told me that one of the nuns who student-taught at her school was being assigned to live out the mission of her order in another locale. As I tried to explain to my 13-year-old, her teacher's move is part of the discipline of a community-based life vowed to holiness, self-sacrifice and service. The notion of a calling that transcends personal ambition or financial gain is foreign to our contemporary American landscape, where the concept of workplace stability is becoming archaic, employee loyalty a quaint anachronism and the notion of a "common good" the province of cloistered academicians.
NEWS
June 6, 1997 | By MATTHEW MILLER
Yesterday was the 50th anniversary of the unveiling of the Marshall Plan, a certifiable moment of American greatness - and one that stares at us across the decades in silent reproach. How can it be that half a century ago, when America was a third as rich, we spent 10 times more as a percentage of our income to help struggling foreigners than we do today? The question goes beyond the matter of foreign aid to something deeper in our national character. Why can't we seem to think big anymore?
NEWS
February 4, 1998 | For The Inquirer / JAY GORODETZER
Pedestrians can ignore this speed-monitoring sign set up by the Lower Merion Police Department on Montgomery Avenue in Narberth. Its purpose is to slow motorists, not the ambulatory.
NEWS
March 17, 1991 | Special to The Inquirer / HINDA SCHUMAN
Ideas were on exhibit at Simmons Elementary School in Horsham last week. On display in the school's hallways and all-purpose rooms were the creative contributions of its students from all grades.
NEWS
August 1, 1993 | For The Inquirer/ TAMMY MCGINLEY
By learning native dances from the Philippines, young American-born Filipinos connect with their heritage. The Mutya Philippine Dance Co. has another purpose - to share the islands' culture with others.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
REAL_ESTATE
September 12, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, REAL ESTATE WRITER
Although it has been out of service for most of the last 40 years, the old Spring Garden School on 12th Street between Ogden and Parrish Streets holds endless fascination for David Cleghorn. "It is an incredibly beautiful building," said Cleghorn, senior vice president of real estate development of Help USA, one of the nation's largest providers of affordable housing and social services. "There are still textbooks from the 1970s sitting on the desks," he said. The graffiti inside the building is "high-quality street art," Cleghorn said, and "we will certainly try to salvage as much as we can. " That last statement provides a clue to the future of Spring Garden School No. 1, designed by Irwin Thornton Catharine, who from 1920 to 1937 was chief architect of the Philadelphia public school system.
REAL_ESTATE
June 20, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, REAL ESTATE WRITER
His goal, he said, will be "DiCianni Tower," a residential high-rise like no other in Philadelphia. Today, however, Frank DiCianni is more than satisfied with 1703 Pine St., a mixed-use building that the 2012 Drexel grad and son of architect Francesco DiCianni spent six months bringing back to life. "It wasn't even for sale," said DiCianni, who lives in the neighborhood and walks by the building - home of the long-shuttered Rittenhouse Cleaners - every day. After finding the building's owner in Brooklyn, N.Y., DiCianni said, "I made a deal.
NEWS
June 15, 2016
By Joseph J. DeFelice During the months-long debate about Mayor Kenney's proposed soda tax, we heard the same argument over and over: This is for the kids. Now, as Council has advanced a "compromise" bill that is likely to pass Thursday, an eleventh-hour change means that much of the revenue is going to a slew of the mayor's distinctly non-child-related priorities. This includes $41 million over four years for the city's general fund - from your pocket to the city's coffers. Yes, all those children they trucked in for "read-ins" at City Hall were unwittingly supporting our spiraling pension costs and opaque city contracts, which city Democrats are loath to address.
REAL_ESTATE
June 6, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, REAL ESTATE WRITER
I don't water lawns. I consider it a waste of a precious resource, and years of experience have taught me that the grass will come back after a dry or hot spell. I do water our gardens, though, and I've just hooked up a diverter to one of the garage downspouts that is convenient to our raised beds, for both watering by hand and setting up a drip-irrigation system. I attached two rain barrels to the diverter, and they filled up in a few hours on one of May's many rainy days. The diverter I chose closes automatically when the barrels are filled, and whatever rain falls from then on is directed into the splash block and away from the garage's foundation.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2016
ARIES (March 21-April 19). You can go forward without support; plenty of people have done it before you. But your journey will be so much easier with the power of like minds and the intentions of kindred spirits behind you. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). The thing you've been working on has an important purpose, though that purpose may seem secondary in the rush you get when you display the spoils publicly and invoke instant envy. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). Your life is either defined by your most cherished goals, or it is defined by surreptitious aims that are in conflict with those goals.
NEWS
April 14, 2016
By Arthur Caplan, Lee Igel, and Dominic Sisti With one week to go in the NBA regular season, Sam Hinkie decided to step down as general manager and president of basketball operations of the Philadelphia 76ers. As Sixers fans know, Hinkie has deliberately had the team tanking for years. His departure has to do with the Sixers brass, at the behest of an aghast NBA, forcing him to share decision-making authority with newly recruited executive Bryan Colangelo. But mainly Hinkie's departure has to do with a failure of "The Process.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2016 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
For the most part, Michael McDermott seemed to be taking advantage last week of the unseasonably warm March weather. He rode his bike to meet me at Mount Airy's High Point Café, where he was enjoying an iced coffee when I arrived. The one incongruous element was his decidedly chillier choice of reading material: On the table between us sat a paperback copy of the Tibetan Book of the Dead. The actual title of that collection of texts, which traces the experience of the consciousness after death, is Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State . McDermott, who performs and records under the name Mikronesia, borrowed that title for his concert this weekend in Kensington, which is meant to accompany a less permanent limbo.
NEWS
November 18, 2015 | BY CLAUDIA VARGAS, Inquirer Staff Writer cvargas@phillynews.com, 215-854-5520
DOZENS OF shrink-wrapped boxes containing unused wireless network equipment have been stacked away for years inside a city warehouse, the City Controller's Office has found. The equipment was part of a $2 million purchase the city made in 2010, with federal grant money, to launch a public-safety Wi-Fi system. The plan was eventually put on hold and the equipment has been rendered obsolete, city officials said. Following the discovery of the unused equipment, City Controller Alan Butkovitz is asking that the Nutter administration conduct an assessment of the wireless equipment to determine its value and compatibility with current technology.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
'Well . . . I was expecting Romeo and Juliet ," said one theatergoer in a slightly embarrassed murmur at a recent Quintessence Theatre Group intermission. In contrast to Shakespeare's supremely idealistic love story, The Mandrake by Niccolo Machiavelli (yes, that Machiavelli) enveloped the stage with cynicism and lust, as translated by Wallace Shawn during the sex-steeped, pre-AIDS 1970s. The mix-up was understandable: Quintessence is doing the two plays in repertory in a daring juxtaposition that ultimately works for the kind of intelligent theatergoer who's interested in sociological contrasts.
FOOD
July 3, 2015 | By Jill P. Capuzzo, For The Inquirer
On the third Saturday of the month, about 200 Southern Californians trek to a San Diego farm just north of the Mexican border for what might be the country's biggest monthly potluck. In Nashville, it's the third Thursday when residents from all parts of the city come together to share dishes they've prepared, preferably using ingredients from their own gardens. Then there's the annual summer food bloggers' potluck in upper Bucks County that has become such a major event that it draws sponsorship from prominent food corporations.
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