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NEWS
December 25, 2011 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - Tens of thousands of people fed up with Vladimir V. Putin's domination of Russian politics and his perceived arrogance toward them jammed one of Moscow's broadest avenues Saturday for a giant protest, vowing to keep building the pressure until the longtime leader is driven from power. "Russia without Putin!" the crowd chanted as it protested alleged fraud during Dec. 4 parliamentary elections that saw Prime Minister Putin's United Russia party garner nearly 50 percent of the vote.
NEWS
March 8, 2012 | By Vladimir Isachenkov, Associated Press
MOSCOW - A jubilant Vladimir V. Putin on Wednesday shrugged off opposition claims that his presidential election victory was unfair and marred by fraud, saying any violations were not significant enough to affect the vote's outcome. Putin slapped at his foes, criticizing them as failing to offer a constructive program and daring the opposition to become a real political force by proving its worth at the ballot box - a tall order in a country where elections are tightly controlled and opposition parties have been sidelined.
NEWS
January 27, 2004 | By Warren P. Strobel and Mark McDonald INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
As diplomatic protests go, it was a prod rather than a slap. But all the same, Secretary of State Colin L. Powell yesterday publicly aired growing U.S. concerns that Russian President Vladimir V. Putin was stifling democracy and resuming the Kremlin's traditionally heavy-handed dealings with its neighbors. Writing in a front-page article in the newspaper Izvestiya, Powell said that "certain developments in Russian politics and foreign policy in recent months have given us pause.
NEWS
September 2, 2001 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Kicking off Russia's school year yesterday, President Vladimir V. Putin said that for the first time next year the government was set to spend more money on education than on defense. Russia's education system is chronically underfunded, and university admissions are plagued by corruption. Long-planned reform initiatives - including extending school education from 11 to 12 years and introducing standardized tests for high school graduation - have yet to move beyond the discussion stage.
NEWS
January 30, 2012 | Associated Press
MOSCOW - Thousands of cars flying white ribbons or balloons circled central Moscow Sunday in a show of protest against Russian Prime Minister Vladimir V. Putin. The cars - ranging from luxury sedans and sporty convertibles to old, exhaust-spewing Soviet models - jammed the inner lanes all along the nearly 10-mile Garden Ring, which has as many as 16 lanes of traffic at its widest points. More protesters stood along the side of the road waving white ribbons and flags as the vehicles passed, their horns blaring.
NEWS
October 6, 2011 | Associated Press
MOSCOW - The widely publicized incident in which Russian Prime Minister Vladimir V. Putin pulled up ancient Greek jug fragments from the seabed on a diving expedition was staged, his chief spokesman said. The August dive in the Kerch Strait that connects the Black and Azov Seas was reported extensively in Russian and overseas media. Putin is noted for his habit of appearing in vigorous and adventurous settings, including fishing while stripped to the waist and riding with leather-clad motorcyclists.
NEWS
March 10, 2012 | By Kate Andersen Brower and Roger Runningen, Bloomberg News
President Obama called Vladimir V. Putin Friday and congratulated the Russian leader on his victory in the March 4 presidential election, according to a White House statement. "The two leaders outlined areas for future cooperation, including strengthening trade and investment relations," according to the statement. They "agreed to continue discussions on areas where the United States and Russia have differed, including Syria and missile defense. " Obama called Putin while on his way to Prince George County in southern Virginia for a speech, spokesman Josh Earnest said.
NEWS
January 2, 2000 | By Stephen Seplow, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The immediate response of Russians to the unexpected resignation of Boris N. Yeltsin on Friday and the ascendancy of Vladimir V. Putin was a broad display of confidence in the new leader. The Russian stock market soared 18 percent to reach its highest point in 15 months. What Russians seemed to be saying by gambling on the stock market was that they believed democracy and market reforms - as fragile as both are - are likely to continue stumbling forward. But Russians also may be gambling that Putin, who was named prime minister only in August, will restore some of Russia's global stature.
NEWS
March 11, 2012 | By Maria Danilova and Lynn Berry, Associated Press
MOSCOW - A protest rally against Vladimir V. Putin drew more than 20,000 people Saturday, far fewer than in past months, as the opposition movement appears to be losing momentum since Putin's presidential election victory. Speeches by young activists like 27-year-old Maxim Kats, however, showed that some of the new political energy in Russia is being channeled into local politics and civic activism. Kats and two others in their 20s, who just won seats on municipal councils, were among a number of speakers who called on Muscovites to get involved in how their city is run, starting with their own neighborhoods.
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NEWS
June 5, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
'I can tell you outright and unequivocally that there are no Russian troops in Ukraine," Russian President Vladimir Putin told a live TV audience in April. He was flat-out lying. Moscow has armed and directed the so-called "rebel forces" in eastern Ukraine and bolstered them with its own troops. Thousands of Russian troops are massing on Ukraine's eastern border, possibly poised for a further invasion. Yet Western leaders still won't publicly challenge Putin's lies. "If you don't call it by what it is, there is less pressure to confront the real issues," John Herbst, the former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine, told me this week.
SPORTS
March 5, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
PATRIOTS OWNER Robert Kraft had preferred seating at Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's speech to Congress at the U.S. House chamber yesterday. Kraft sat in the second row, directly behind Netanyahu's wife, Sara, and to the left of author and Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel. No word on whether Netanyahu tried to pull a "Putin" and steal Kraft's most recent Super Bowl ring. During a 2005 trip to Russia, Kraft showed Putin his hefty jeweled ring from Super Bowl XXXIX, when the Patriots beat the Eagles.
NEWS
December 30, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Sometimes it seems as if America, at 238 years old, is suffering from a sort of midlife crisis that has it questioning its strength and leadership. Questioning is fine; few are pleased with Washington these days. But it was more troubling to hear some critics suggest that President Obama should be more like Russian President Vladimir Putin. Some were apparently impressed by the machismo Putin displayed in invading Ukraine even though it was morally wrong. Much of that sentiment evaporated as casualties mounted in the war Putin incited to keep Ukraine firmly in Russia's orbit rather than the European Union's.
NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
In 1949, George Orwell published Nineteen Eighty-Four , his famous portrait of a totalitarian regime whose "Ministry of Truth" spews rank propaganda called "Newspeak" that turns historical facts on their head. Newspeak has been alive and well these past weeks in Moscow, where President Vladimir Putin flatly denied any Russian presence in Ukraine, even as thousands of Russian troops and heavy weapons invaded that country. What's more disturbing is that NATO leaders meeting in Wales last week to discuss Ukraine refused to denounce Putin's aggression as an "invasion.
NEWS
August 10, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vladimir Putin is mad and has vowed revenge. Will it include a cybercrime wave directed at the West? And if yes, has it already begun? Some minds are connecting two prominent news stories of the last week. Maybe it's paranoia. Maybe it's silliness. And maybe it's an understandable question. Even if there's no direct link, in a bigger, elusive way, hacking is a vital part of Russia's effort to learn what it wants and thwart what it doesn't. Like most other countries. The first story broke Tuesday, when Hold Security of Milwaukee announced it had found records of an enormous theft.
NEWS
August 1, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
The Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 disaster should have been a wake-up call for Vladimir Putin. It wasn't. Instead of decreasing aid for pro-Russian separatists who almost certainly shot the plane down with a Russian missile, Putin is upping the ante. While denying any responsibility for the 298 dead, he is sending additional troops to the Ukrainian border and preparing to send more deadly weapons to the separatists. This despite the fact that the air tragedy has finally jolted the European Union into imposing new and tougher economic sanctions on Russia - matched by Washington.
NEWS
July 21, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Vladimir Putin has become a global menace. There is an irrefutable link between the Russian leader's reckless policies on Ukraine and the downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17. This tragedy is the direct outgrowth of his decision to train and arm Ukrainian separatists with heavy weapons in an effort to destabilize Ukraine. It doesn't matter whether the triggerman thought he was targeting a Ukrainian military plane rather than a civilian airliner. More than 200 European civilians, along with dozens of Aussies, Asians, and North Americans, lie dead because of Putin's determination to force Ukraine to join a new Russian empire.
NEWS
July 21, 2014
The gall of Russian President Vladimir Putin can be unnerving. For example, take his response to the missile attack that destroyed a Malaysian jetliner flying over war-torn Ukraine: "This tragedy would not have happened if there was peace in this land. " He's right. But who is responsible for the absence of peace? Vladimir Putin. Putin's manufacture of Ukraine's civil war was as precise as a watchmaker's careful placement of intricate parts to ensure a timepiece's operation. If the missile was fired by Ukrainian rebels, as is believed, they likely were trained by Russians.
NEWS
May 25, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Trudy Rubin: Putin appears to recognize that his project to annex Ukraine's south and east, or install separatists there, is failing. C1.
NEWS
May 18, 2014
Seek security from civic strength In his remarks at the Sept. 11 museum dedication in New York last week, President "Yes We Can" Obama made a George W. "Bring It" Bush-worthy statement ("Obama: 'Nothing can ever break us'," May 16). Sounds good, but it's not true. Are we nothing? We can break ourselves by continuing down the wrong paths, including the creation of a surveillance nation, trade deals that off-shore better jobs for cheap, shiny objects and corporate profits, growing wealth inequality, and government dysfunction led by one party favoring a tax-free and science-denying America, and another that's well-meaning but enabling.
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