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Pyongyang

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NEWS
April 1, 2012 | By Jean H. Lee, Associated Press
PYONGYANG, North Korea - The sprawling site, which buzzes in the shadow of a giant bronze statue of North Korea founder Kim Il Sung, looks at first like a high-security military installation. Scores of soldiers march through a zone sealed off by green mesh fencing and checkpoints. About 1,000 soldiers and 2,000 police officers work around the clock, along with thousands of civilians in street clothes and hard hats, spurred on by billboards that rate their performance. But they are not building tanks here at the foot of Mansu Hill, or weapons, except perhaps for a propaganda war. They are building 3,000 apartments, a department store, schools, and a theater, in the hope of selling a modern version of Pyongyang to the people of North Korea - albeit one that most will never get to see. North Korea has long been known for its military-first policy, which translated into a military-only policy with little room left for investment elsewhere.
NEWS
January 2, 2003
It's hardly a coincidence. Just as the Bush administration seems to be edging ever closer to war in Iraq, North Korea is sticking out its tongue at Washington. North Korean President Kim Jong Il is crazy, some insist - crazy as a fox, say others. His recent actions suggest the latter. What better time to squeeze the United States for aid and normalization than when the White House is so focused on that Baghdad bad boy, Saddam Hussein? After all, the White House can't be eager to juggle two major international crises at once.
NEWS
March 9, 2013 | By Colum Lynch and Chico Harlan, Washington Post
UNITED NATIONS - The U.N. Security Council approved tough new sanctions Thursday against North Korea over its latest nuclear test, brushing aside Pyongyang's threat of nuclear retaliation against the United States and other nations it labels aggressors. Voting unanimously, the 15-member council condemned North Korea for its Feb. 12 test and imposed sanctions aimed at making it more difficult for the country to finance its weapons programs and obtain materials for them. Before the vote, North Korea issued statements describing Washington as a "criminal threatening global peace" and threatening preemptive nuclear action.
NEWS
December 30, 2002 | By Tony Pugh INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Seeking to play down any sense of crisis, Secretary of State Colin L. Powell said yesterday that the United States would use diplomatic and economic pressure, and not preemptive military action, to deter North Korea from expanding its nuclear-weapons program. "I don't want to create a sense of crisis or that we're on the brink of war, because I don't believe we are," Powell said on the ABC program This Week. Powell, who appeared on several Sunday talk shows, said the Bush administration was communicating with Pyongyang through third parties, but would not consider direct talks with North Korea until it backed off its apparent nuclear buildup.
NEWS
October 10, 2006 | By John C. Bersia
North Korea, by announcing a nuclear-weapons test, is demonstrating how a relatively small, insignificant, reclusive and quirky country can dominate the global stage. Its leaders may well believe that they are earning respect, particularly from the United States, and enhancing their nation's protection. They may also have concluded that their "nuclear insurance" will shield them, as they apparently think such efforts have done in Iran, especially considering that the United States is bogged down in Iraq and Afghanistan.
NEWS
June 10, 1998 | By Jodi Enda, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
After meeting with South Korean President Kim Dae Jung, President Clinton said yesterday that he would work with the former political prisoner to ease tensions with North Korea. But rather than lift stiff economic sanctions against the communist north, as Kim has suggested, Clinton said he would support an undefined "policy of reciprocity" to help reconcile the two countries. Kim, who has worked to repair relations with North Korea since taking office in February, last week called on the United States to lift punitive sanctions to expose Pyongyang to free enterprise and liberalize its Stalinist political system.
NEWS
October 13, 2006 | By Larry Eichel INQUIRER SENIOR WRITER
Rep. Curt Weldon (R., Pa.), who led a congressional delegation to North Korea last year, said yesterday that Russia held the key to getting Kim Jong Il's government to abandon its nuclear program. In an interview, Weldon, vice chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, said he believed North Korea would give up its nuclear ambitions in exchange for a reliable source of revenue and energy. The most viable source, he said, would be a pipeline bringing natural gas from Russia through South Korea.
NEWS
February 29, 2004 | By Tim Johnson INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
North Korea said yesterday that U.S. assertions it had a secret program to turn highly enriched uranium into material for nuclear bombs were based on "false information. " A senior North Korean envoy issued the denial as the latest round of six-nation talks on Pyongyang's nuclear programs fizzled to a close in an atmosphere of what a Chinese diplomat described as an "extreme lack of trust. " The four days of talks ended with widely differing interpretations of the outcome.
NEWS
April 10, 2013 | By Chico Harlan, Washington Post
SEOUL, South Korea - North Korea said Monday that it would pull out all workers from an industrial complex operated jointly with the South and examine the possibility of closing the facility permanently. The North's announcement, carried by its state-run news agency, halts the last form of inter-Korean cooperation at a time when Pyongyang has rattled the region by threatening a series of attacks and declaring a state of war with the South. Though North Korea barred South Koreans from the Kaesong plant on Wednesday, few analysts suspected that it would shutter the plant - which generates foreign currency for the authoritarian government - even temporarily.
NEWS
April 9, 2013 | Associated Press
SEOUL, South Korea - A top South Korean national security official said Sunday that North Korea may be setting the stage for a missile test or another provocative act with its warning that it soon will be unable to guarantee diplomats' safety in Pyongyang. But he added that the North's clearest objective is to extract concessions from Washington and Seoul. North Korea's warning last week followed weeks of war threats and other efforts to punish South Korea and the U.S. for joint military drills, and for their support of U.N. sanctions over Pyongyang's Feb. 12 nuclear test.
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NEWS
March 4, 2016
The U.N. Security Council on Wednesday unanimously approved the toughest sanctions on North Korea in two decades, reflecting growing anger at Pyongyang's latest nuclear test and rocket launch in defiance of a ban on all nuclear-related activity. The United States and China, North Korea's traditional ally, spent seven weeks negotiating the new sanctions, which include mandatory inspections of cargo leaving and entering North Korea by land, sea or air; a ban on all sales or transfers of small arms and light weapons to Pyongyang; and expulsion of diplomats from the North who engage in "illicit activities.
NEWS
February 18, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Samuel H. Moffett, 98, who after completing a missionary career in China and Korea was a professor at his alma mater, Princeton Theological Seminary, died Monday, Feb. 9, at the Princeton Windrows retirement community. Dr. Moffett was the Henry Winters Luce Professor of Ecumenics and Mission there from 1981 to 1987, when he retired, according to seminary communications director Michelle Roemer-Schoen. Born of missionary parents in Pyongyang, now the capital of North Korea, Dr. Moffett earned a bachelor's summa cum laude in the classics at Wheaton (Ill.)
NEWS
July 25, 2013 | By Foster Klug, Associated Press
SEOUL, South Korea - North Korea has stopped construction work at a site meant to launch bigger and better long-range rockets, a possible sign that Pyongyang is slowing or even halting development of larger rockets, according to a new analysis of recent satellite imagery. The sight of unfinished roads and grass growing from the foundation of a large new rocket assembly building could be welcome news for Washington and others who see Pyongyang's nuclear and missile work as a threat - though it is unknown if the work stoppage is only temporary.
NEWS
July 6, 2013 | By Eric Talmadge, Associated Press
TOKYO - An American imprisoned in North Korea has told a pro-Pyongyang media outlet that he wants the United States to "try harder" to help him gain amnesty from a sentence of 15 years of hard labor for alleged crimes against the government. In what appears to be his first media interview since his November arrest, Kenneth Bae told the Tokyo-based Choson Sinbo in an article published Wednesday that he had hoped to be out by Thursday. That was not only Independence Day but his father's 70th birthday.
NEWS
July 5, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
TOKYO - An American imprisoned in North Korea has told a pro-Pyongyang media outlet that he wants the U.S. to "try harder" to help him gain amnesty from a sentence of 15 years of hard labor for alleged crimes against the government. In what appears to be his first media interview since his November arrest, Kenneth Bae told the Tokyo-based Choson Sinbo in a story published Wednesday that he had hoped to be out by yesterday. That was not only the Fourth of July, but also his father's 70th birthday.
NEWS
June 17, 2013 | By Chico Harlan, Washington Post
SEOUL - North Korea on Sunday proposed wide-ranging "senior-level" talks with the United States, an offer it said Washington should accept without setting any "preconditions" about denuclearization. The North's proposal marked the latest attempt at reconciliation for a family-run police state that spent much of March and April making threats. In a statement issued by its state-run news agency and attributed to the National Defense Commission, a top policy body, North Korea said the talks should be used to defuse "military tensions," draft a peace treaty for the peninsula, and discuss mutual denuclearization.
NEWS
June 9, 2013 | By Foster Klug, Associated Press
SEOUL, South Korea - Government delegates from North and South Korea began preparatory talks Sunday at a "truce village" on their heavily armed border aimed at setting ground rules for a higher-level discussion on easing animosity and restoring stalled rapprochement projects. The meeting at Panmunjom, where the truce ending the 1950-53 Korean War was signed, is the first of its kind on the Korean peninsula in more than two years. Success will be judged on whether the delegates can pave the way for a summit between the ministers of each country's department for cross-border affairs, which South Korea has proposed for Wednesday in Seoul.
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | By Sam Kim, Associated Press
SEOUL, South Korea - North and South Korea on Thursday agreed to hold talks on reopening a jointly run factory complex and other cross-border issues, after months of deteriorating relations and a day before a U.S.-China summit in which the North is expected to be a key topic. The envisioned talks, welcomed by Washington, could help rebuild avenues of inter-Korean cooperation that were obliterated in recent years amid hard-line stances by both countries, though the key issue isolating the North from the world community - its nuclear program - is not up for debate.
NEWS
May 23, 2013 | By Margie Mason, Associated Press
PYONGYANG, North Korea - After months of ignoring Chinese warnings to give up nuclear weapons, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un sent a high-level confidant to Beijing on Wednesday in a possible effort to mend strained ties with his country's most important ally and a sign that he may be giving diplomacy a chance. The trip by Vice Marshal Choe Ryong Hae, a senior Workers' Party official and the military's top political officer, is taking place as tensions ease somewhat on the Korean Peninsula after near-daily vows from Pyongyang to attack Washington and Seoul in March and April.
NEWS
May 10, 2013 | By Foster Klug, Associated Press
SEOUL, South Korea - North Korea delivered its most in-depth account yet of the case against a Korean American sentenced to 15 years' hard labor, accusing him late Thursday of smuggling in inflammatory literature and trying to establish a base for anti-Pyongyang activities at a border city hotel. Still, the long list of allegations included no statement from Kenneth Bae, other than claims that he confessed and didn't want an attorney present during his sentencing last week for what Pyongyang called hostile acts against the state.
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